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Tales They Lose (Probability Sequence) Paperback – 5 Sep 2003


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Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Superscript (5 Sept. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0954291328
  • ISBN-13: 978-0954291327
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 1.2 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,081,094 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Synopsis

This anthology of historical reminiscences and Borgesian fragments documents the metamorphoses of Academia to shopping mall, library to disco and caryatid into a pile of decomposing books.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By anotherreader on 11 Mar. 2004
Format: Paperback
It took me a while to get round to this one. I didn’t think I was going to like it. But the Gdala bits are at least as good as anything else she has done and this is by far the most accessible volume in the Probability Sequence so far – you want to read it over and again to experience it again rather than to understand the bits you didn’t quite get the first time.
I am coming to the view that the secret of Gdala”s unique take on the Hegelian ‘moment’ is that while most cultural theorists pretend to be writing about other (categories of) people when really they are expressing their own prejudices Gdala reverses this?
Fans of Steven Box ( rightly acknowledged as the true father of British ‘Deviancy Theory’ ) will treasure the pieces by and about him. It is salutory to remind ourselves that he lived to see the beginning of the treacherous usurping of this radical perspective by “New” Criminology, later to become New Realism (the shaky 1984-type rationalisation of New Labour) but fate silenced him before they did.
The Orwellian nightmare and its iconic date, 1984, pop up throughout this book from the poignant narrative of The Burial at Highgate to the complex and disturbing image of Pierrot des Cartes.
Other rare treats are the wonderful drawings by the poet Garcia Lorca, and the truly extraordinary personal correspondence with the psychologist Cyril Burt which throws new light on the recently revived controversy over his fraudulent “research”.
Get this book. Read it. Then read it again. You will love it.
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Format: Paperback
I am no sociologist, but as an ex-husband of one of the late Steven Box’s ex-wives I was privileged to see a prepublication copy of this eclectic anthology, which is in part a tribute to Box’s contribution to radical thinking.
Two of the stories/essays actually made me cry.
In my opinion there have been some powerful critiques of the direction of our global culture over the years, but, in this century so far, only Arundhati Roy exceeds Amy Gdala in her ability to stir the reader to tears of sorrow, rage and compassion for the state of humankind. Keep it coming sisters – we need your clear brave voices singing songs of freedom.
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