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Tales Of Mystery And Imagination - Edgar Allan Poe
 
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Tales Of Mystery And Imagination - Edgar Allan Poe

12 May 1992 | Format: MP3

4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 5.71 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
4:14
2
3:57
3
4:38
4
4:33
5
4:20
6
7:02
7
2:39
8
1:00
9
4:36
10
0:51
11
4:46


Product details

  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 1987 The Island Def Jam Music Group
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 42:36
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KW9UAS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 18,542 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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12
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Themis-Athena on 5 Jan 2003
Format: Audio CD
I'll never forget the first work by Edgar Allan Poe I ever read: it was "The Tell-Tale Heart," and Poe's short story about a madman who kills and dismembers an old man by whose "evil eye" he feels haunted soon outgrew the high school class assignment it had originally been for me; and the narrator's nightmares began to haunt me, too. (Yes, I was an impressionable 16-year-old, but Poe really *was* the master of horror for all ages.) Alan Parsons's rendition of the story on the third track of "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" does full justice to its sense of lunacy masquerading as clairvoyance, and the urgency of the narrator's acts, driven by the sound of the old man's beating heart, hidden below the floor boards of his room, and symbolized here by the steady bass and drum beat underlying the entire track - except for the deceptively serene bridge ("And he won't be found at all, not a trace to mark his fall nor a stain upon the wall"), after which it returns with all the greater force, accentuated by the grating sound of an electric guitar which, along with the bassline and drums, causes some to describe this song as more of a traditional rock song than the other parts of this album.
The album starts with an instrumental based on the poem "Dream Within a Dream," and the brief Poe quote from 1846's "Marginalia" (where "Dream Within a Dream" was also published), spoken by Orson Welles and added only on 1987's remastered CD. In many ways, this quote sets the theme for the entire album, and for Poe's work in general: "There is ... a class of fancies of exquisite delicacy which are not thoughts ... These fancies arise in the soul, alas how rarely ... at those weird points of time, where the confines of the waking world blend with the world of dreams. ...
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Richard B. Cockbain on 9 Oct 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is a fine album, an absolute classic but I have still to learn to love the CD version with Mr Parson's tinkering.
I find the addition of synth and guitars irritating as some of the best musical passages are obscured by unnecessary additional instruments.
The addition of Orson Wells to the start of "A Dream Within a Dream" is simply scandalous! The opening of this track was a lovely build up to the beautiful craftsmanship that is the rest of the album, instead this is masked by a narrative.
Parsons formed the project on the back of his work with Pink Floyd and the quality of the production is testimony to his pedigree.
For me, the original recording does not need any enhancement it stands the test of time as a classic. This version remains excellent and it is a delight to hear the clarity but I would prefer to be listening to a CD of the original.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By DSR VINE VOICE on 3 Aug 2006
Format: Audio CD
The problem with many '70's pop/rock recordings is that they were often mixed very "close up" and, sometimes, almost in mono, with little bass and treble energy, so the LP medium could best cope with it. Such is almost certainly the case with this wonderful collection of tracks. I love the flow of the original version, especially the thunder claps/knocking sequence on The Fall Of The House Of Usher, which I still have (the gatefold sleeve's artwork is great too...).

There is a real danger that if this original version had been released on CD as-is, "we'd" all be complaining about the sound [...]. It would appear that Mr Parsons decided to redo the mix [...] for CD...

There's no doubt at all of the superior "layering" of the sounds in this version. The drums have been mixed back in perspective to give everything else room to breathe. A couple of parts have been re recorded to remove the "analogue" hiss and distortion. The orchestration on "side 2" now has a better perspective to my ears - one can hear the musicians well spread out in front of you, rather than all clumped together in a sometimes muddy puddle.... The shame for me was the timing relationship between the thunder and door pounding on 'Usher has been changed. Still, I've lived with this mix now for twenty years or so...

The thing is, the mastering techniques for "vintage" seventies multi track recordings have improved so much in recent times that a good overall job could probably now be done with the original...

The album as it currently stands MORE than deserves 5 stars.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Feb 2000
Format: Audio CD
Tales & Mystery is a collection of songs based on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Eric Woolfson & Alan Parsons team up as the prime songwriters. And what an excellent job they have done. The ballads are glorious, the rock songs are tight and rock out. But the most inventive and seductive segment of the album is the sensational 'The Fall of the House of Usher'. As the song builds up you can feel the tension whilst the orchestra grasps you with pure emotion, until it hits it inevitable climax.
This album is a must listen, whether you're fans of the genre or not, but I definitely recommend it to be heard in one listen. The best of the Alan Parson's collection as far as I am concerned although I'm sure plenty would disagree.
Nothing short of spectacular!
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