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Takin' Off


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Product details

  • Audio CD (20 May 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Hallmark
  • ASIN: B00CHJ5KP2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 90,632 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Watermelon Man 2. Three Bags Full 3. Empty Pockets 4. The Maze 5. Driftin' 6. Alone And I - Herbie Hancock

Product Description

Former Miles Davis' sideman Herbie Hancock launched his long and illustrious solo career with Takin' Off, released by Blue Note in 1962. Featuring Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, Dexter Gordon on tenor saxophone, Butch Warren on bass and Billy Higgins on drums, Takin' Off showcased Herbie's abilities as both a leading pianist and as a composer. The standout track is undoubtedly Watermelon Man, a hard bop workout that was to become something of a jazz standard, thanks in part to a cover version by Mongo Santamaria, with Herbie returning to the song in 1973 and caming up with a jazz funk version. As a whole, Takin' Off is an exceptional debut album, one that merely hints at the future creativity of one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Nov. 1999
Format: Audio CD
This R'n'B-influenced first album of Hancock's is great if you are the mood for some fairly laid back jazz. Bop fans will be let down by the fairly simple chord voicings and lack of substitutions by the soloists. However, this is brilliant if you want to trace Hancock's development towards Headhunters (a decade later); especially comparing Watermelon Man on both albums. It is also a real confidence booster for jazz composers who feel they need to write complex, thick-textured pieces but can't quite get the feel - dig this and you'll feel you can get there soon! The only problem with this CD version is that you get the bonus tracks - it kind of spoils the magic of the solos when you hear how close the two versions sound! But, this is not to the discredit of the amazing jazz artistes present for the set. To conclude, I'd get this CD if you want to hear the development of Hancock or if you want simple, earthy music with not overly flashy solos. Personally, though my money's on Headhunters!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Alan Cross on 19 Sept. 2007
Format: Audio CD
This is the RVG remaster of Herbies debut album as bandleader - at the age of 22 !!

The album opens with arguably the most famous of the great mans recordings and there is also an alternate take for real afficiandos !

By any standards this is a classic album with Freddie Hubbard on sparkling form, Dexter Gordon on tenor sax, a great rhythm section and brilliant arrangements.

The remarkable thing about this debut recording is the story behind it - Hancock grew up in Chicago where his extraordinary talent was recognised with a performance with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at the age of 11 - his first paid gig was with Coleman Hawkins in Chicago and his second was with Donald Byrd in New York and at the time of this recording Herbie was still at college !!

Perhaps that explains why at less than 40 minutes the original album was a bit brief - Herbie had to get his homework done !

3 alternate takes - remarkably similar to the originals stretch this recording out to 57 minutes - but every moment is a landmark in jazz and launched the career of one of the all time greats.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jazzrook TOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 Aug. 2013
Format: Audio CD
This was pianist/composer Herbie Hancock's debut as leader recorded for BLUE NOTE in New Jersey on May 28, 1962 with a quintet including Dexter Gordon(tenor sax); Freddie Hubbard(trumpet & flugelhorn); Butch Warren(bass) & Billy Higgins(drums).
Everyone is in superb form on six varied Hancock originals(plus three alternative takes) and the highlights include the original version of Watermelon Man(2 takes), the ballad 'Alone and I' and 'The Maze'.
'Takin' Off' is one of Herbie Hancock's finest albums containing almost an hour of inventive hard bop which still sounds fresh over 50 years later.
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Format: Audio CD
Takin' Off was Herbie Hancock's first recording as leader at the age of twenty two. The story was that he wanted to record a trio album (by the way a message for Mr Cross, another reviewer on this site: the original album was "short" because vinyl LPs had a running time of up to 40 minutes, not the eighty of modern CDs...and some CDs are definitely too long containing too much "filling"...quantity is not necessarily better than quality) but Blue Note insisted that he recorded as a quintet with two "names"; hence the presence of Dexter Gordon and Freddie Hubbard.
There are six tracks (plus on the CD three "alternate takes") starting with the masterpiece "Watermelon Man", a piece of jazz-funk that has become synonymous with Herbie Hancock. Blue Note were probably right to insist on the addition of tenor and trumpet since the tunes work better in quintet being essentially hard bop tunes which were in vogue during 1962 (think Adderley or Silver).
Needless to say the musicianship of Gordon and Hubbard is outstanding, but young Hancock meets them on equal terms despite his inexperience.
Many think that one would have this in their collection as an historical "document"; I disagree. This is a fine album under any circumstances that maintains a high standard throughout.
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