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TRSF
 
 

TRSF [Kindle Edition]

Tobias Buckell , Pat Cadigan , Paul Di Filippo , Gwyneth Jones , Geoffrey Landis , Vandana Singh , Cory Doctorow , Joe Haldeman , Elizabeth Bear , Ma Boyong

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Product Description

Product Description

Featuring all-new stories by a dozen of the most visionary science fiction authors writing today, TRSF takes us to 12 possible worlds of tomorrow. Inspired by the real-life breakthroughs covered by MIT's Technology Review, celebrated writers join the freshest talent from around the world to describe what the future may have in store for the Internet, biotechnology, energy, computing, and more.

Illustrated with an original cover painting by legendary sci-fi illustrator Chris Foss, the TRSF also features classic Foss covers inside its pages.

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INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the 2011 TRSF, the first annual anthology of original science fiction stories from MIT’s Technology Review. With stories set in the near future from celebrated masters and emerging authors, TRSF is our contribution to the tradition of “hard” science fiction. It’s a tradition that stretches all the way back to Jules Verne, in which writers draw from the cutting edges of engineering and science, and try to portray how technology might advance in a way that futurists, economists, and other down-to-earth pundits can’t.

Because of its emphasis on technical plausibility, hard science fiction has been accused in the past—not always unfairly—of neglecting plot and character development in favor of breathless exposition about some flashy gadget or astronomical phenomenon. But the stories in these pages prove that you don’t have to sacrifice great writing to say something interesting about how the future might work. Hard science fiction has also been accused—again, not always unfairly—of being the jealously guarded preserve of mostly American men. So, striving for a richer spectrum of viewpoints, we have chosen male and female authors who come from around the world, including one writer whose work is appearing for the first time in English.

Inspired by the real-world technological breakthroughs covered online and in print by Technology Review, these authors bring you 12 visions of tomorrow, looking at how the Internet, computing, energy, biotechnology, spaceflight, and more might develop, and how those developments might affect the people who have to live with them. What do you think of these visions? What technologies do you believe are going to profoundly transform how we live, and would deserve to be the inspiration for a story in next year’s TRSF?

-- Stephen Cass, Editor

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 726 KB
  • Print Length: 147 pages
  • Publisher: Technology Review, Inc.; 1 edition (4 Oct 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006BF2Q2S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #329,537 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars TRSF: A Technology Magazine Goes Science Fiction 11 Dec 2011
By Underwords - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
For me, the most exciting thing about the new annually published science fiction magazine TRSF is that it's published by Technology Review Magazine, one of the most interesting science and technology magazines on the market. What's so special about Technology Review? It's published by MIT, a.k.a. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which is the premiere engineering, science, and research institution in the world.

I should also mention that I work at MIT, and I received my copy of TRSF from the publisher. So, I may be a slight bit biased here, but good fiction speaks for itself and TRSF sings! Given MIT's intellectual and scientific resources, it is not surprising that Technology Review (TR to those of us who know and love the magazine) features some of the most fascinating articles about cutting edge science, clever new inventions, and mind-boggling discoveries being written today. Science + Fiction + MIT = TR, an awesome hard science fiction magazine that will get your imagination going.

The concept behind the publication of TRSF is fascinating. After all, how many science and technology magazines start a science fiction magazine in this day and age?

Having Technology Review branch out into new territory and publish TRSF as an annual science fiction magazine, featuring near future hard science fiction is truly exciting. After all, imagination goes a long way toward spurring and encouraging new scientific discoveries. You never know, maybe someday the science fiction in one of these stories may become science reality. Now, that would be exciting!

The contributors of the first annual TRSF are all very talented writers, most of whom I've read before. In the introduction, editor Stephen Cass says:

Inspired by the real-world technological breakthroughs covered online and in print by Technology Review, these authors bring you 12 visions of tomorrow, looking at how the Internet, computing, energy, biotecnology, spaceflight, and more might develop, and how those developments might affect the people who have to live with them.

While all of the stories in TRSF were engaging, well written and inspiring, there were a few that stood out:

"Complete Sentence" by Joe Haldeman is one of my favorites in the bunch. It's a chilling tale of crime and punishment that will make you think twice about guilt, innocence, and the the choices we make.
"Real Artists" by Ken Liu has a flavor of being a little too true and will make you wonder how those big blockbuster movies are really made. The next time you go to the movies, you might even find yourself looking around the theater wondering . . . *spoilers!*
"Private Space" by Geoffrey A. Landis is a high flying story that captures the spirit of combining imagination and science into something that not only could happen but probably will happen-at some point. On a side note, while this wasn't my favorite story in the magazine, it did a wonderful job of capturing the MIT spirit of curiosity, invention, and contributing to science.
"The Brave Little Toaster" by Cory Doctorow is a nice way to kick-off TRSF. It's a short piece that will make you think twice about automatically accepting those nifty product samples that marketing reps handout at malls, on the street, and other public places. While it is an exciting to think of living in a truly networked world, there is something to be said for the simple technologies that do what we want them to do no matter what they think they should do.

The Table of Contents for TRSF is listed below.

The Brave Little Toaster - Cory Doctorow
Indra's Web - Vandana Singh
Real Artists - Ken Liu
Complete Sentence - Joe Haldeman
The Mark Twain Robots - Ma Boyong
Cody - Pat Cadigan
The Surface of Last Scattering - Ken MacLeod
Specter-Bombing the Beer Goggles - Paul Di Filippo
Lonely Islands - Tobias Buckell
The Flame Is Roses, The Smoke Is Briars - Gwyneth Jones
Private Space - Geoffrey A. Landis
Gods of the Forge - Elizabeth Bear

TRSF is available in print as well as in a digital format for your Kindle or Nook.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Realistic/fanciful speculations on foreseeable future 23 Dec 2011
By Brian H. Fiedler - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
80 pages, with 12 shorts stories. A brief review seems appropriate. In science fiction, I don't like fantasy or supernatural stuff, or life forms or social structures that don't make evolutionary sense. None of that in TRSF. Mind expanding. May help you to think about where your own scientific or engineering profession may be leading us, in the "forseeable future". Will buy again next year.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reinvention of Short Science Fiction 29 Feb 2012
By Reginald Goodwin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
TRSF: This became quickly an addiction, and only a disappointment when I realized "Gods of the Forge" by Elizabeth Bear was the last story. "Complete Sentence" was morbidly chilling and satisfying, yet I wasn't quite sure what was the mental/emotional toll of serving a 100-year sentence in 10 hours. The funniest stories that I kept repeating to friends were "The Mark Twain Robots" by Ma Boyong (a good reflection of Asimov's Three Rules of Robotics); "Specter-Bombing the Beer Googles" by Paul Di Filippo - I literally cried reading this one, reminding me of "Anonymous." I look forward to the next issue - post "Apocalypse" - in 2013.

Extraordinary authors:

The Brave Little Toaster - Cory Doctorow
Indra's Web - Vandana Singh
Real Artists - Ken Liu
Complete Sentence - Joe Haldeman
The Mark Twain Robots - Ma Boyong
Cody - Pat Cadigan
The Surface of Last Scattering - Ken MacLeod
Specter-Bombing the Beer Goggles - Paul Di Filippo
Lonely Islands - Tobias Buckell
The Flame Is Roses, The Smoke Is Briars - Gwyneth Jones
Private Space - Geoffrey A. Landis
Gods of the Forge - Elizabeth Bear
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Harbinger of the future 24 Oct 2012
By GSR - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This was an excellent depiction of what we can expect in the future.A first rate read.Technology based fictional stories can be effective in bringing science to lay audiences.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Refreshingly modern sci-fi for our time and age 5 Oct 2013
By Arturo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
For all of us who are fans of science fiction anthologies or short stories, TRSF is a much needed breath of fresh air into this highly-inspiring genre which has been historically dominated by authors from, at least, twenty years ago. Following a proud sci-fi tradition, TRSF presents us a compendium of stories from contemporary authors who bring mountains of imagination and unique near-future visions that, once again, inspire you with awe, fear, fascination or simply catalyze some serious day-dreaming into your head, as all sci-fi should.
It's great, both in execution and topics. No longer are we discussing martians or strange aliens but we are also pondering on earth's future climate, computers, biotechnology, the internet, sustainability and much, much more. A great, much needed read.
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