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THE HUNTED (READ BY ALEXANDER ADAMS) [Audio Cassette]

ELMORE LEONARD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: BOOKS ON TAPE (1995)
  • ISBN-10: 0736631615
  • ISBN-13: 978-0736631617
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 13.2 x 3.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Elmore Leonard was born in New Orleans on 11 October 1925. He wrote forty-five books during his phenomenal career, including the bestsellers Mr Paradise, Tishomingo Blues, Be Cool and The Hot Kid. Many have been made into successful movies, including Get Shorty with John Travolta, Out of Sight with George Clooney and Rum Punch, which became Tarantino's Jackie Brown. He is the recipient of the Cartier Diamond Dagger Award and the PEN USA Lifetime Achievement Award. He died on 20 August 2013 in Detroit.
www.elmoreleonard.com

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Hunted. 25 May 2006
Format:Paperback
This is typical Elmore Leonard but with an intriguing backdrop. He uses words so carefully that you can imagine all the places with the minimum of description. The plot runs along the idea that this guy Rosen is on the run from the mob in detroit but gets unlucky. This introduces us to the scene and then the characters take over. The plot runs along at a good pace but really I enjoy picturing the charcters and seeing their reactions to situations. If you like your books to be sharp and the dialogue crisp then you are probably a fan already. This won't let you down. It's not his greatest but it is well worth a read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The hunted 7 Jun 2013
By Tox
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Anyone of the people portrayed in this book could have a series of books written with them as the central role. Elmore Leonard is that good.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Elmore Goes To Israel 19 Jun 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I've read almost all of Elmore Leonard's 'modern day' books. This (In my opinion) is one of the weaker efforts. As many other reviewers have probably asserted previously; a weaker Elmore Leonard effort is still far superior to a great percentage of other crime writing.

I think that Elmore Leonard's work is often lumped together by critics, as if to give the idea that the tone and atmosphere of his work is constant, as much to say it is always of the same quality and type of story, or that you can always be certain of what you are going to get. I think that this is not quite true. What remains consistent across all of the books I have read is the style of writing and generally strong characterisation through dialogue.

My personal feeling is that the pleasure of reading one of his books is more about enjoying the flow, observing the characters, listening to them speak, rather than strong, compelling plots. He is no Chandler or Hammett. His stories are almost always pretty 'small' and is very rarely edge of the seat stuff. He's good at setting a scene and sketching up an atmosphere, but he (in my opinion) lacks the subtlety and intelligence that a great writer puts to use conjuring a character that assumes a life in the reader's mind when the book has been long closed [Kem Nunn, is a good example of a writer that can generate this resonance].

That may sound like a harsh or unfair criticism, but it should be taken in light of the enormous praise that has been heaped upon his work. He has made the transition from being little known and underrated to very well known and overly praised, which will leave a lot of readers new to his work feeling a little nonplussed. He is not a Great Novelist, he's just an entertaining writer and there is nothing wrong with that.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 17 Sep 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
A wonderful series very well produced. Brilliant!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  19 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Evolution of a Marine 27 Oct 2003
By DJK ver 2.0 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I was a little skeptical of an Elmore Leonard novel set in Israel. However, 'The Hunted' pleasantly surprised me.
Al Rosen is hiding out in Israel, living off the checks sent his way by the company he helped found. He spends his days hanging out in hotel lobbies, getting sun, and just simply staying out of sight. Before he knows it, he finds himself on the run after his picture appeared in the daily newspapers in the States--the result of having helped a dozen senior citizens escape a hotel fire.
Sgt. David Davis is about to finish his tour with the marines. The big problem is that he has no idea what to do with himself once he is out. On the side, he has helped deliver packages for Rosen, without really knowing who Rosen is. Before he knows it, his future plans are of no real concern as he attempts to help Rosen out of his mess.
I'll give Elmore credit, he took what I thought would be an uninteresting setting, and really turned it into something. There isn't a lot, but Leonard makes some interesting observations about Israel and Americans there. Most of it comes from the ignorance of some of the American characters as they interact with the Israelis.
The dialogue is classic Leonard. Some of the best conversations come between Rosen and Davis as Rosen attempts to give Davis advice on what to do when he finally gets out of the marines. Nearly every scene involving Mel Bandy, Rosen's sleazy lawyer (and he is sleazy), involve some comical dialogue. Rosen's assistant, Tali, has some decent remarks as she deals with Bandy and translates for others.
The only disappointment is the end. To some degree, it seems like Leonard just ran out of things to write about and came up with whatever plausible ending occurred to him. Still, its a good read and will be appreciated by Leonard fans.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No Good Deed... 3 July 2005
By Bill Slocum - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Al Rosen stuck his neck out to help the government put some goons in prison, only it didn't go according to plan. Now Rosen is in hiding for his life. Life was still good until Rosen helped some old timers get out of a burning hotel, and wound up getting his face in the papers. Now he's on the run in Israel with three killers on his tail and a U.S. Marine for company. The Marine wants to help. Maybe he should ask Rosen what happens to do-gooders.

Elmore Leonard in 1977 was still years away from being embraced for marrying suspense stories with witty dialogue, quirky characters, and off-center humor, but he was well on his way toward perfecting that approach when he wrote "The Hunted." In some ways echoing Leonard's past as a writer of westerns, with Mexican standoffs by dry wadis, "The Hunted" isn't exactly scintillating by Leonard's later standards, but it more than holds its own.

You can almost see Quentin Tarantino adapting it for the screen, with Rosen's way of wooing 40-something women to bed and characters who digress about God while waiting for the guns to start blazing. The bad guys are not without their enjoyable qualities, and there's Mel Bandy, a fat lawyer of no discernable morals whose idea of wooing an attractive assistant involves walking around her in a towel and inviting her to bed with him by telling her she can close her eyes and pretend it's someone else.

Leonard throws some nice philosophy here, too, though it doesn't get in the way of the terse narrative:

"Don't let people scare you; because nine times out of ten they don't know any more than you do," Rosen explains to the Marine. "Or even less. They got there pushing and shoving, acting, conning...If they had to get by on basic intelligence - most of the people I've done business with - they'd be on the street selling Good Humors and probably ------- up the change."

"The Hunted" didn't amuse me like great comic Leonard novels such as "Maximum Bob" and "Freaky Deaky." It didn't thrill like "Rum Punch" or "Bandits." The plot is actually kind of threadbare, and a little nonsensical, when you think about Rosen's unresolved financial situation and how it's supposed to be resolved by a visit from the untrustworthy Bandy.

But "The Hunted" manages to keep you reading, and surprises you more than a little at the end. You'll enjoy the amiable company of both the good guys and bad guys while appreciating Leonard's mastery of his craft. He hadn't entirely moved out of the Western idiom even as he left the American West, but considering that he was the author of westerns like "Hombre," why should he have been in any rush?
16 of 22 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Another Elmore book, just like all the other Elmore books 3 Jan 2001
By Martha R. Ulfelder - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I think I've figured out why Leonard is the lit crits' token crime-writer darling: They don't give a rat's behind about plot, and neither does he. Me, I like a little plot in my crime books.
What's interesting is that this book was originally published in '77, and back then, Leonard actually bothered to cook up some pretty good stories (especially in The Switch). So you can read The Hunted as a harbinger of modern Leonard. He starts with three or four good characters (the no-BS middle-aged hero; the black-guy-and-white-guy likeable hoodlum team; the attractive young woman who knows how to watch out for herself). He has them sit around in bars, cars and hotels staring at each other. Eventually, there's a showdown. No twists, no real surprises.
OK, fine. But as far as I can recall, every single Leonard book since the mid-1980s has gone the same way. I suspect Leonard starts with the showdown, then works backward to figure out how it developed. This guarantees lots of filler; you get the feeling Leonard gets a kick out of showing you his cast of characters, and another out of his climax, and doesn't much care about the stuff in between. Hence cars, bars, hotel rooms.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sleeper hit 24 May 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
OK, so if you read lots of Elmore Leonard, you'll know that this isn't perhaps his finest piece. It might not have as many plot twists and turns that some of his other tales have, but here's the catch, he's still the best. He draws characters more vividly and economically than anyone I've ever read. You never know what's coming next, even when you do know what's coming next. This is fun stuff to read.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Lousy Actor 15 Jan 2014
By Paul - Published on Amazon.com
It sounded like a terrific book, and I'm sure it is, but based on this actor's interperative reading I could only get through around five chapters...or 1 1/2 CDs. I understand the reader wants to make each character distinctive and give them their own "voice", but this reading became downright annoying. The portrayals were cliched and the accents were either so poor or so "hammy" that it just became unlistendable.
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