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TCP/IP Illustrated: v. 3: TCP for Transactions, HTTP, NNTP and the Unix Domain Protocols: TCP for Transactions, HTTP, NNTP, and the UNIX Domain Protocols (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series) [Hardcover]

W. Richard Stevens
2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
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Book Description

19 Jan 1996 0201634953 978-0201634952 1
Praised by reviewers and practicing TCP/IP programmers alike, the TCP/IP Illustrated series examines the many facets of the TCP/IP protocol suite using a unique and highly-effective visual approach that describes the inner workings of TCP/IP with detail, insight, and clarity. Volume 3 provides detailed coverage of four essential topics with which today's TCP/IP programmers and network administrators must be thoroughly familiar: *T/TCP (TCP for Transactions), an extension to TCP that makes client-server transactions faster, more efficient, and more reliable; *HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol), the foundation for the rapidly expanding World Wide Web; *NNTP (the Network News Transfer Protocol), the basis for the Usenet news system; and *UNIX Domain Protocols, a set of protocols used heavily in UNIX implementations. As in the previous two volumes, the book is filled with examples and implementation details within the 4.4BSD-Lite networking code. The TCP/IP Illustrated series provides a complete picture of the protocol suite that drives the Internet, and gives programmers, system administrators, and serious users the information, understanding, and skills they need to remain at the forefront of networking technology. 0201634953B04062001

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TCP/IP Illustrated: v. 3: TCP for Transactions, HTTP, NNTP and the Unix Domain Protocols: TCP for Transactions, HTTP, NNTP, and the UNIX Domain Protocols (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series) + TCP/IP Illustrated: Volume 2: The Implementation: The Implementation v. 2 (APC) + TCP/IP Illustrated: The Protocols v. 1 (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing)
Price For All Three: 115.94

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley; 1 edition (19 Jan 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201634953
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201634952
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 19.2 x 2.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 645,606 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

From the Back Cover

Praised by reviewers and practicing TCP/IP programmers alike, the TCP/IP Illustrated series examines the many facets of the TCP/IP protocol suite using a unique and highly-effective visual approach that describes the inner workings of TCP/IP with detail, insight, and clarity.

Volume 3 provides detailed coverage of four essential topics with which today's TCP/IP programmers and network administrators must be thoroughly familiar:

  • T/TCP (TCP for Transactions), an extension to TCP that makes client-server transactions faster, more efficient, and more reliable;

  • HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol), the foundation for the rapidly expanding World Wide Web;

  • NNTP (the Network News Transfer Protocol), the basis for the Usenet news system; and

  • UNIX Domain Protocols, a set of protocols used heavily in UNIX implementations.

As in the previous two volumes, the book is filled with examples and implementation details within the 4.4BSD-Lite networking code.

The TCP/IP Illustrated series provides a complete picture of the protocol suite that drives the Internet, and gives programmers, system administrators, and serious users the information, understanding, and skills they need to remain at the forefront of networking technology.



0201634953B04062001

About the Author

We are deeply saddened to learn of the death of noted author W. Richard Stevens. His passing is obviously a tremendous loss for the technical community, but it is a personal one for us as well. Rich was both a gifted colleague and a valued friend who will be greatly missed. We extend our sympathies to his family.

Obituary from the Arizona Daily Star:

STEVENS, W. Richard, noted author of computer books died on September 1. He is best known for his "UNIX Network Programming" series (1990, 1998, 1999), "Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment" (1992), and "TCP/IP Illustrated" series (1994, 1995, 1996). Richard was born in 1951 in Luanshya, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), where his father worked for the copper industry. The family moved to Salt Lake City, Hurley, New Mexico, Washington, DC and Phalaborwa, South Africa. Richard attended Fishburne Military School in Waynesboro, Virginia. He received a B.SC. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan in 1973, and an M.S. (1978) and Ph.D. (1982) in Systems Engineering from the University of Arizona. He moved to Tucson in 1975 and from then until 1982 he was employed at Kitt Peak National Observatory as a computer programmer. From 1982 until 1990 he was Vice President of Computing Services at Health Systems International in New Haven, CT, moving back to Tucson in 1990. Here he pursued his career as an author and consultant. He was also an avid pilot and a part-time flight instructor during the 1970's.

He is survived by his loving wife of 20 years, Sally Hodges Stevens; three wonderful children, Bill, Ellen and David; sister, Claire Stevens of Las Vegas, NV; brother, Bob and wife Linda Stevens of Dallas, TX; nieces, Laura, Sarah, Collette, Christy; and nephew, Brad. He is predeceased by his parents, Royale J. Stevens (1915-1984); and Helen Patterson Stevens (1916-1997). Helen lived in Tucson from 1991-1997, and Royale lived here in the early 1930's attending Tucson High School while his father was treated for TB at the Desert Sanitorium (now TMC). The family asks that in lieu of flowers, donations be made in Richard's name to Habitat for Humanity, 2950 E. 22nd Street, Tucson, AZ 85713. A memorial service for Richard will be held at St. Phillip's in the Hills Episcopal Church on Tuesday, September 7th at 12:00 noon. Following the service there will be a reception in the Murphy Gallery of the Church. Please wear colorful clothing to the service; Richard loved colors.

W. Richard Stevens was an acknowledged UNIX and networking expert and the highly-respected author of several books. He was also a sought-after instructor and consultant.



0201634953AB04062001

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Volume 1 covered the basic - down to the nitty, gritty bits. Volume 2 gave us the source. Volume 3 tells us about T/TCP and HTML. Not more, not less... I devoured the first two volumes - and just browsed the third.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Stevens' left-overs 25 Aug 2003
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Inadequate coverage of HTTP, which has had much added to it since this book was written. Transactions for TCP are probably not very interesting for many people, as its a protocol that never seems to have taken off - though it was Stevens pet project.

Whilst I wouldn't hesistate to recomment the 1st 2 volumes (and the 2 UNP volumes and APUE), I'd say that this one is less than essential.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but not as good as the other two 28 Jan 2005
By Joshua Davies - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
After having read volumes I & II, I felt compelled to read volume III in spite of other customer reviews here. Having just finished this one, I'm inclined to agree with the other reviewers - interesting, but not as earth-shattering as the first two. The first half of the book covers, in volume-II style detail, an implementation of T/TCP for BSD; although this is interesting, it's not very practical, since T/TCP never caught on in the real world. The next part of the book covers HTTP & NNTP, but doesn't go into much detail; if you know what HTTP & NTTP are, you probably already know all the material covered in this book. Finally, the book ends by examining the BSD implementation of the Unix domain sockets. This last bit was the most relevant part of the book, but don't even think about trying to read this if you haven't completed volume II (and have it handy - the text refers back to specific pages and diagrams from Volume II). If you've read the other two books (Volume II in particular), you'll want to read this one to round out the experience, but don't expect to be blown away like you were with the others.
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book supplimenting the first 2! 5 Nov 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Like the other two volumes, this book is the definite bible if you are interested in HTTP, T/TCP and UDP. As time passes, these protocols will be used more widely and one will see more people interseted in the book. Similar protocols just start to emerge in areas such as wireless....
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good book, covering rarely explained protocols. 30 May 2000
By Uri Raz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This book covers a need distinct from the first two volumes - the first two covered the core protocols' internals, while this one covers the application level protocols - a subject hardly covered by any other book.
I've found this book very useful for understanding T/TCP, a subject my teacher did not explain well and was obscure for me.
The NNTP & HTTP cover was useful, especially as I was doing a lab on HTTP, but I must admit that as far as HTTP goes the RFCs were sufficient.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Writing software for the web? 15 Mar 2001
By Wayne Witzel III - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
If you are planning on writing any software for the web, this is one of the books you need. This book covers T/TCP, HTTP, NNTP, and more including UD Protocols and some good info in the appendix.
W. Richard Stevens has never let me down with any of his books, and this one is no diffrent. Its too bad hes not around to write books any more, alot of people will be missing out on great books from a great author.
This is a must have!!
31 of 45 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The sequel to a sequel - doesn't live up to Vol 1 and 2 27 Mar 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Volume 1 covered the basic - down to the nitty, gritty bits. Volume 2 gave us the source. Volume 3 tells us about T/TCP and HTML. Not more, not less... I devoured the first two volumes - and just browsed the third.
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