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Symphony No. 6 [Mariss Jansons, Symphonie Orchestra des Bayerischen Rundfunks] [BR Klassik: 900123]

Symphonie Orchestra des Bayerischen Rundfunks , Dmitri Shostakovich , Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky , Mariss Jansons Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Frequently Bought Together

Symphony No. 6 [Mariss Jansons, Symphonie Orchestra des Bayerischen Rundfunks] [BR Klassik: 900123] + Mozart: Requiem in D minor, KV 626 + Mahler: Symphonies 4-6
Price For All Three: £52.93

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  • Mozart: Requiem in D minor, KV 626 £14.97
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Product details

  • Conductor: Mariss Jansons
  • Composer: Dmitri Shostakovich, Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
  • Audio CD (28 April 2014)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: BR Klassik
  • ASIN: B00INYM0OO
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 129,427 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 54: I. Largo15:41Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 54: II. Allegro 6:21£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 54: III. Presto 7:47£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74, "Pathetique": I. Adagio - Allegro non troppo18:08Album Only
Listen  5. Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74, "Pathetique": II. Allegro con gracia 8:04Album Only
Listen  6. Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74, "Pathetique": III. Allegro molto vivace 9:04Album Only
Listen  7. Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74, "Pathetique": IV. Finale: Adagio lamentoso10:18Album Only


Product Description

Chostakovitch : Symphonie n°6, op.54 - Tchaïkovski : Symphonie n°6, op.74 "Pathétique" / Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks - Mariss Jansons, direction

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I use the comparison with Bernstein in my title because he recorded 2 of the most extreme interpretations of these works in the early digital era, the Shostakovich with the VPO and the Tchaikovsky with the NYPO. To say that tempi were broad is to put it mildly, though I have to say that I think his approach pays real dividends in the Shostakovich-I simply cannot abide the mawkish, self-indulgent Tchaikovsky.
This new slightly unlikely pairing emanates from live concerts in 2013, the Shostakovich in the Herkulessaal, and the Tchaikovsky from Gasteig.
The interpretation of both works brings to mind Reiner and Szell at their very best, for Mariss Jansons adopts very fast tempi, brilliantly executed by his virtuoso orchestra, tellingly shaped but never allowed to wallow to the detriment of the music.
The result is that both works emerge as fresh and unhackneyed, not easy to achieve with the Tchaikovsky especially.

The opening work is the Shostakovich-in the opening chords the sonority of the BRSO lower strings is breathtaking-it sounds like there might be about 40 of them!-and Jansons moves the opening movement along with drive but never losing the emotional kick that this music delivers.
The recording is very wide ranging in both works, with dynamics challenging at times.
The second movement is a display of possibly the most brilliant musicianship I have ever heard-the playing of the BRSO is superhuman, especially at the whip crack tempo adopted by Jansons, and the third and ( and in this work, final )movement is scarcely less so, with Jansons catching all the galumphing and raucous bonhomie of the work to perfection!
No wonder thunderous applause breaks out at the end.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A splendid pairing of two tragic Sixths, with a special nod to the Shostakovich 17 April 2014
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
I agree with the lead reviewer that Mariss Jansons can fell into the trap of attending to beautiful sounds at the expense of excitement, to the point that I've wondered, hearing some of his tamer recordings, what the music actually means to him. but here, as a St. Petersburg-trained conductor in the lineage of the great Mravinsky, he's on solid ground. The two mournful Sixths of Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich share a musical lineage too, since both composers returned again and again to the tragic possibilities of the symphony form (only the postwar symphonist Karl amadeus Hartmann pursued the same track as compulsively). Shostakovich had more reason, we might suppose, to express the sorrow of his times, but Tchaikovsky may be the more complete composer, since his well of inner grief didn't prevent him from writing his three vibrant, joyous ballets.

Jansons' complete Shostakovich cycle on EMI, currently out of print, suffered from various drawbacks: it took years to complete, moved from one orchestra to another, and was interrupted by a major heart attack that could have ended his career. He achived no triumphant performances to rival Mravinsky, Kondrashin, or Bernstein. Amends were made, partially, by an excellent Sym. #7 "Leningrad" with the Concertgebouw on their house label. Equally fine s this live sixth form Munich, with the Bavarian Radio SO sounding magnificent and captured in state-of-the-art sound, as we've come to expect from BR Klassik. The high point of the score is the opening Largo (the first movement of the Tchaikovsky is also a slow movement, of course); here the playing pulls out all the stops in its intensity, and although Jansons' timing of 15:44 is a full four minutes faster than Vasily Petrenko's version, both conductors are successful in their own way - Petrenko achieves an agonized inwardness, Jansons a grand lyrical sweep.

The two other movements have always been a bit baffling - both a quick, short, and zany, as if the composer couldn't find a way beyond the tragic Largo except to clown in the face of death. Mravinsky gives these interludes a note of biting defiance, which I think is right, and Jansons doesn't miss the opportunity for eeriness and sarcasm. His woodwind soloist also play much better than Mravinsky's Soviet counterparts. The Rossini-like gallop of the finale is at once elegant and exciting. All told, a great success.

For anyone whose memory goes back far enough, Jansons' first early triumph on records was a "Pathetique" with the Oslo Phil., which became a great favorite of British reviewers. It never quite caught fire for me, but I was curious to hear the remake twenty years on. This is a score where hoping to find the best recording is defeated at the start. I've never heard a performance that wasn't a sobering event, whether it drew tears or not. The tragic power of the music can't be entirely disarmed. The greatest readings amplify this impact - I'm thinking especially of Furtwangler, Reiner, Mravinsky, the first Bernstein from New York, and Gergiev with the Vienna Phil. (Gergiev is ubiquitous now, but his first appearance to conduct Vienna in the last three Tchaikovsky symphonies was considered a remarkable occasion).

If you are in the Russian musical lineage, as Jansons is, even though a Latvian, I think they burn your visa if you conduct an indifferent "Pathetique," and this one isn't. Jansons is enough of a technician, and devoted enough to beautiful sounds, that he keeps a certain distance from the symphony's wrenching emotions. The reading is warm and involved throughout; my attention didn't wander, as it tended to while listening to Jansons Tchaikovsky fifth with this orchestra. But too much is urbane to rank among the great "Pathetiques."

In all, this CD will most appeal, I think, to anyone who wants both works in gorgeous sound and with world-class playing. The Shostakovich stands on its own, though, as do many moments in the Tchaikovsky, such as the totally convincing 5/4 waltz movement, which is beautifully supple and alive. Jansons' understatement of the tragedy in the outer movements may be considered a positive by other listeners, if not me.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jansons claims yet another victory with a staggering Pathetique 15 April 2014
By Andrew R. Barnard - Published on Amazon.com
Simultaneously the principal conductor of the Concertgebouw and the Bavarian Radio Symphony, Mariss Jansons has been forcing me to rethink his potential as a conductor. In the past, I've viewed Jansons as being predominately too tame, with expert conducting that often fails to catch fire. In the past several months, we've heard an astounding Britten War Requiem and Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique, both with the Bavarian Radio Symphony. I worried that the sudden thrust of inspiration was temporary, but this new release raises my hopes even higher.

The disc opens with Shostakovich's 6th Symphony. Jansons has long been considered a Shostakovich specialist, but his refinement has kept him from having the natural flair one attributes to Gergiev, Petrenko, and Jurowski, among modern native champions. His Shostakovich has tended to sound smooth, running the risk of sounding unnecessarily slick, despite some good intentions. Here Jansons doesn't compete with the aforementioned Russians for spontaneity and intuition, but he has a lot going for him with the the playing of the splendid Bavarian orchestra and BR Klassik's sound, which is literally incomparable even in today's modern era. My familiarity with the work is limited, so I'll refrain from passing definite judgment, but my instinct tells me Jansons is musically convincing within his more subdued framework. There's a rich sound to the orchestra that adds expansiveness and tantalizing details. I'd also postulate that his conducting sounds more engaging than usual, with enough energy to produce success.

It's easy for a conductor to run through the motions in Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique" Symphony, despite the greatness of the work. As enjoyable as Tchaikovsky's symphonies are, collectors will attest that too many readings are afflicted with sameness. Critics struggle to avoid building unintended prejudices in relating to musicians, and I'll confess my prior assessment of Jansons would have condemned him as the wrong man for the job in this work. While it's true that Jansons avoids anything rough-hewn or unsophisticated, he finds a way to bring all the subtleties of the orchestration to life, increasing the emotional impact in the process. Jansons is too beautiful to seem portentous, but he finds a definite pulse and finds strength in shaping textures with startling vividness. It's as if though you can hear each instrument in the orchestra, playing with finesse while still sounding virile and passionate. Jansons isn't keen on fire or Russian abandon, but his conviction is outstanding and definitely distinctive.

What pushes Jansons' conducting into the realm of greatness is his ability to carefully mold phrases without giving way to pretentiousness or over-refinement. Sometimes he seems to nearly caress the music, but it adds to the pathos instead of distracting. I'm coming to see this as his defining talent, and one that can give him the edge over Simon Rattle, another conductor with a world-class orchestra who favors ultra-detailed voicing.

It would be unfair to categorize this as a calm reading, though, at least in the face of a thrilling third movement that kept me riveted from beginning to end. For sheer energy, it outstrips nearly all the readings in my library, and for sound and playing and I can't think of anything to put up against it. Also captivating is the second movement, where Jansons finds a way to be free-flowing and achingly tragic all at once. At the end of the day, Jansons' tender, aching phrasing is what has me mesmerized. I repeatedly found myself replaying sections that stood out for supreme virtuosity and interpretive ingenuity, but the cohesive impact is undeniable.

I'm happy to announce that Jansons has triumphed yet again, as he continues to rise in my estimation. I'll be following him more closely in the future with higher expectations.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The antitdote to recordings of these works by Bernstein-brilliant, beautifully recorded and dazzlingly played. A triumph! 1 May 2014
By D. S. CROWE - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I use the comparison with Bernstein in my title because he recorded 2 of the most extreme interpretations of these works in the early digital era, the Shostakovich with the VPO and the Tchaikovsky with the NYPO. To say that tempi were broad is to put it mildly, though I have to say that I think his approach pays real dividends in the Shostakovich-I simply cannot abide the mawkish, self-indulgent Tchaikovsky.
This new slightly unlikely pairing emanates from live concerts in 2013, the Shostakovich in the Herkulessaal, and the Tchaikovsky from Gasteig.
The interpretation of both works brings to mind Reiner and Szell at their very best, for Mariss Jansons adopts very fast tempi, brilliantly executed by his virtuoso orchestra, tellingly shaped but never allowed to wallow to the detriment of the music.
The result is that both works emerge as fresh and unhackneyed, not easy to achieve with the Tchaikovsky especially.

The opening work is the Shostakovich-in the opening chords the sonority of the BRSO lower strings is breathtaking-it sounds like there might be about 40 of them!-and Jansons moves the opening movement along with drive but never losing the emotional kick that this music delivers.
The recording is very wide ranging in both works, with dynamics challenging at times.
The second movement is a display of possibly the most brilliant musicianship I have ever heard-the playing of the BRSO is superhuman, especially at the whip crack tempo adopted by Jansons, and the third and ( and in this work, final )movement is scarcely less so, with Jansons catching all the galumphing and raucous bonhomie of the work to perfection!
No wonder thunderous applause breaks out at the end.

I cannot emphasise enough the glorious playing and dazzling interpretation given to this work by these forces and I hear it anew on each playing.

The Tchaikovsky will not be to the taste of those who require to be subsumed into Tchaikovskian slush of the Hollywood variety, for Jansons takes the music according to the score, eschews extreme gestures and as result gives a performance that can inspire again and again-it does not drain the emotions, but rather uplifts them as a response to such great artistry.
The Gasteig acoustic results in a slightly more "punchy" sound, with detail emerging that I cannot recall from other recordings-the eerie sound of the stopped horns is very unsettling in the finale's climax-and again a very wide dynamic results in a stunning sound picture.

The playing is again exquisite -whether in the beautiful unfolding of the main theme in the opening movement, the perfect lilt of the second, the sheer brilliance of the third with Jansons pushing the march theme ever faster with each return requiring staggering virtuosity from his players yet again-or the intense passion of the finale which is dramatic, powerful and moving without descending into melodrama-and at the tempo chosen does not outstay its welcome.

This is Jansons' third recording at least of this work, and is the most telling by far.
If I have a small niggle it is merely that the audience erupts into applause a little too precipitately after the end of the Pathetique somewhat ruining the effect of the silence, so stop the disc ASAP after the last chord!
In these performances, these works do actually sit well together-there are sufficient differences but also similarities in style to make them a very attractive pairing, and ardent Tchaikovsky lovers who normally shun the music of Shostakovich will be dazzled by this performance of his jovial 6th- and if this does not convert them, nothing will!
Comparisons are difficult-I would have to say that of the many recordings of the Shostakovich that I own, none is comparable with this dazzling achievement.
The list of great Pathetiques is almost endless (much like Bernstein's last recording!), but Karajan x4 (including his 1936 BPO recording), Ormandy, Temirkanov, Maazel, Svetlanov, Mravinsky and the recent Kitajenko all continue to give pleasure, and readers will be able to add other favourites to the list of great recordings -not one is better played or recorded than the this new version.
Thankfully Maestro Jansons is continuing to lead this great orchestra having relinquished Directorship of the Concertgebouw-this disc alone is a testimony of the greatness of his relationship with the BRSO. Totally recommended. Stewart Crowe.
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