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  • Symphony No. 0 /  Helgoland, Psalm 150
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Symphony No. 0 / Helgoland, Psalm 150 Import


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Product details

  • Orchestra: Chicago Symphony Orchestra & Chorus
  • Conductor: Daniel Barenboim
  • Composer: Anton Bruckner
  • Audio CD (1 Oct. 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B000025HM8
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 303,265 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rick My on 11 Sept. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Bruckner did not assign a number to this Symphony that has been ascribed the number 0 "Die Nullte". He wrote it after his Symphony No. 1 in C minor (1866) and his sketches of an aborted Symphony (also 1869) in Bb major. The melodic structure, although familiar to modern listeners, was such a radical departure from mainstream Romantic Era Symphonies that it lead to criticism from the conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Felix Otto Dessoff. Consequently Bruckner suffered a crisis in confidence, and this piece, (amongst others) was never performed in his lifetime.

Daniel Barenboim recorded this, with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 1979 as a part of his complete cycle of Bruckner Symphonies. Barenboim is justly noted for his inspirational interpretations of the Great Germanic Romantic Masters. Although there have been more recent digital recordings of this work, this recording transferred well to digital media giving a crisp fresh sound full of depth and colour. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra hold the length and depth well, giving due gravitas without being melodramatic. A great performance well worth archiving.

This version is the score edited by Leopold Nowak in 1968. For the original 1924 published version you could consider the 1966 Bernard Haitink / Concertgebouw Orchestra on on Philips CD. Other more recent recordings worthy of consideration include the 1981 Stanislaw Skrowaczewski recording with the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, and the 1995 Georg Solti recording, again with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Decca).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 2 Nov. 2012
Format: Audio CD
I don't know if the infamous Rag and Bone men of Oil Drum Lane, Steptoe and Son, are Brucknerians or otherwise. Either way, this disc would surely attract their attention; trash and treasure are on offer.

Only Anton Bruckner, the Holy Madman, could compose a Symphony No. Zero, to say nothing of the infamous Double Zero. It's unbelievable.

Robert Simpson, who penned the authoritative notes to this disc, argues that the first movement of the Zero was written after the First Symphony whereas Bruckner drew upon earlier material for the remainder. It is hard to argue against this theorem: there's a qualitative divide in the work. The opening Allegro is fabulous. It contains a central episode (here, 6'35" onwards) which is unlike anything else he ever wrote: it can best be described as an eclogue. The coda of the first movement presages things to come in its mastery. The Scherzo is not without merit - it sounds like Bruckner is having a big night out on the town with the turps, whereas the Andante, Trio and Finale are tepid stuff.

There are two other works on this disc. Helgoland, for Men's Choir and a full orchestra, is Bruckner's last completed work. It's virile even if unfortunate associations come to mind (it could serve as the soundtrack to `Operation Barbarossa - the Musical'). I part company with Simpson re Psalm 150. He acclaims this late work as a masterpiece. To my ears, it sounds like an offcut from the Te Deum and less inspired at that.

Over the years, Daniel Barenboim has been a loyal servant of Anton Bruckner even if the inspiration has been fitful on occasions. Here he is in best form. He avoids over-inflating the work with portentousness. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra is no mean ensemble in Bruckner and it plays stylishly. The contributions of the choir, soprano and DG engineers are meritorious.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
"No. 0": the First of Three D-minor Symphonies... 14 Aug. 2007
By B.E.F. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
.
Since 1977, Bruckner's works are now catalogued with WAB numbers [Werkverzeichnis Anton Bruckner].

Who but Bruckner would have a Symphony No. 0 ? It's very peculiar. And yet, he did not reject this work of 1869: in fact, giving it the designation-numeral "0" includes it in the canon [WAB 100]. It's actually his third symphony, and falls between the official 1st and 2nd. It's an highly original work of art: Brucknerian Robert Simpson calls it a masterpiece saying, "It is scored with beautiful transparency, its sense of movement is perfect, harmonically it is sensitive and original, and its melodic invention is fluent and refined." Moreover, Bruckner's synthesis of Beethoven's Ninth is most notable. Barenboim and the CSO give the work just a little more breathing-room than Chailly and the RSO-Berlin reading of seven years later Bruckner Symphony No. 0 .

The song of praise, Psalm CL of 1892 [WAB 38], is a later work. Similar in texture and ethos to the famous Te Deum, it is also more concise with a running time of only :08mins. For full chorus and orchestra, the work features a soprano soloist.

Helgoland is a tiny island nearly off the north-western coast of Germany, outside of the harbor of Wilhelmshaven. It had been occupied by Britian since the Napeoleonic wars, but in a gesture of goodwill was ceeded to Germany (1892) at a time when the latter was developing great naval resources on its north coast Dreadnought . The result of which in this case [WAB 71, 1893] is what Oscar Wilde would call "a catastrophe of art"--an unintentiously humorous and jingoistic poem of the Dark Ages by one A. Silberstein wherein the bad Romans are attempting to invade the "Saxon isle"--(talk of convoluted thinking!). Furthermore, it's oddly humorous that a devout Catholic Austrian should take such an interest in the political machinations of Protestant Anglo-Saxons (England & Prussia). Probably the incident was played-up in the newspapers, and Bruckner was caught up in the enthusiasm: the improbable result is Bruckner's 1893 setting for men's chorus and full orchestra, which features thrilling and surging strings and brass with much testosterone: a musico-historical curiosity (:13mins).
.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The best "Nullte" available. 28 Aug. 2010
By Colloredo von Salzburg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The "Nullte" is an important early work from Anton Bruckner. It deserves more attention than it have received in ages. We can recognize the same composing
mastery that we find in his three first numbered symphonies. Barenboim takes
the best of this music and delivers a wonderful and unforgettable rendition.
He shows a mature and skilfull approach in this work and the Chicago Symphony
plays wonderfully. It could be easily taken as the best "Nullte" available...
Don't miss it.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Ground Zero and the Zero 7 Aug. 2012
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
I don't know if the infamous Rag and Bone men of Oil Drum Lane, Steptoe and Son, are Brucknerians or otherwise. Either way, this disc would surely attract their attention; trash and treasure are on offer.

Only Anton Bruckner, the Holy Madman, could compose a Symphony No. Zero, to say nothing of the infamous Double Zero. It's unbelievable.

Robert Simpson, who penned the authoritative notes to this disc, argues that the first movement of the Zero was written after the First Symphony whereas Bruckner drew upon earlier material for the remainder. It is hard to argue against this theorem: there's a qualitative divide in the work. The opening Allegro is fabulous. It contains a central episode (here, 6'35" onwards) which is unlike anything else he ever wrote: it can best be described as an eclogue. The coda of the first movement presages things to come in its mastery. The Scherzo is not without merit - it sounds like Bruckner is having a big night out on the town with the turps, whereas the Andante, Trio and Finale are tepid stuff.

There are two other works on this disc. Helgoland, for Men's Choir and a full orchestra, is Bruckner's last completed work. It's virile even if unfortunate associations come to mind (it could serve as the soundtrack to `Operation Barbarossa - the Musical'). I part company with Simpson re Psalm 150. He acclaims this late work as a masterpiece. To my ears, it sounds like an offcut from the Te Deum and less inspired at that.

Over the years, Daniel Barenboim has been a loyal servant of Anton Bruckner even if the inspiration has been fitful on occasions. Here he is in best form. He avoids over-inflating the work with portentousness. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra is no mean ensemble in Bruckner and it plays stylishly. The contributions of the choir, soprano and DG engineers are meritorious.
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