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Symphony 7 Import


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£13.25 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Product details

  • Orchestra: Berliner Philharmoniker
  • Conductor: Michael Gielen
  • Composer: Gustav Mahler
  • Audio CD (12 Nov. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Testament Records
  • ASIN: B00CTJOQ6E
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 178,208 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Gustav Mahler: Sinfonie Nr. 7 - Langsam - Allegro
2. Gustav Mahler: Sinfonie Nr. 7 - Nachtmusik I: Allegro moderato
3. Gustav Mahler: Sinfonie Nr. 7 - Scherzo: Schattenhaft. Fließend, aber nicht schnell
4. Gustav Mahler: Sinfonie Nr. 7 - Nachtmusik KK: Andante amoroso
5. Gustav Mahler: Sinfonie Nr. 7 - Rondo - Finale

Product Description

Berliner Philharmoniker - Michael Gielen, direction

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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER on 29 July 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Mahler's Seventh Symphony is seen by many as his weakest, though containing much that is great. The 2 outer movements are the usual cause for criticism-and mighty edifices they are in structure, though not necessarily the best constructed!
On the other hand, Klaus Tennstedt in a characteristic fit of over enthusiasm declared in an interview that the first movement was the single greatest work composed by Mahler, and was one of the most significant pieces of music ever written.
This concert from 1994 was in fact scheduled to be conducted by Tennstedt, but at that stage of his life his frailty meant that any scheduled appearance was tenuous, and sadly on this occasion he was not well enough to conduct.

That sadness is tempered by the fact that his replacement was Dr. Michael Gielen, one of the most interesting and cerebral conductors of our era, and whose performances are invariably fascinating and illuminating, though definitely at the opposite end of the spectrum from the emotional commitment of Tennstedt.
Gielen has always been a highly individual interpreter, whose approach is perhaps best likened to that of Boulez-except that where I so often find that Boulez illuminates the mechanics of a work but" eliminates the music", so to speak, Gielen is all about letting the music come through naturally and without affectation. This is not easy with Mahler, and I know that his recorded cycle with his SWR Baden-Baden Orchestra is not to every Mahler lover's taste.

Here he is so galvanised by the sheer brilliance and virtuosity of the BPO that the drive, "electricity" and sheer joyful exuberance that he elicits from this extraordinary score will surely win him admirers from among the sceptics.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By nwc on 17 Oct. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Quite simply the best performance of the work that I have ever heard. Gielen combines the structural focus of Tennstedt, the mercurial characterisation of Bernstein, the instrumental and rhythmic precision of Boulez and the overview of Horenstein ... and then adds something entirely his own. The orchestra plays at the very heights of their magnificent abilities, and the recorded sound is equal to the occasion, providing a full orchestral sound which nevertheless allows miraculous individual detail to come naturally through (this is as much Gielen's work as the recording engineers'). A disc I have returned to frequently in the weeks since it arrived, each time the magic of this life-affirming performance shines anew - a performance that should put an end to all those comments about the work being the "Cinderella" of the Mahler Symphonies: she marries the Prince once and for all, here. Recommended with no reservations whatsoever
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
A Great Performance and Recording which will surely win new admirers for Dr. Michael Gielen-even among sceptics! 15 Aug. 2013
By D. S. CROWE - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Mahler's Seventh Symphony is seen by many as his weakest, though containing much that is great. The 2 outer movements are the usual cause for criticism-and mighty edifices they are in structure, though not necessarily the best constructed!
On the other hand, Klaus Tennstedt in a characteristic fit of over enthusiasm declared in an interview that the first movement was the single greatest work composed by Mahler, and was one of the most significant pieces of music ever written.
This concert from 1994 was in fact scheduled to be conducted by Tennstedt, but at that stage of his life his frailty meant that any scheduled appearance was tenuous, and sadly on this occasion he was not well enough to conduct.

That sadness is tempered by the fact that his replacement was Dr. Michael Gielen, one of the most interesting and cerebral conductors of our era, and whose performances are invariably fascinating and illuminating, though definitely at the opposite end of the spectrum from the emotional commitment of Tennstedt.
Gielen has always been a highly individual interpreter, whose approach is perhaps best likened to that of Boulez-except that where I so often find that Boulez illuminates the mechanics of a work but" eliminates the music", so to speak, Gielen is all about letting the music come through naturally and without affectation. This is not easy with Mahler, and I know that his recorded cycle with his SWR Baden-Baden Orchestra is not to every Mahler lover's taste.

Here he is so galvanised by the sheer brilliance and virtuosity of the BPO that the drive, "electricity" and sheer joyful exuberance that he elicits from this extraordinary score will surely win him admirers from among the sceptics.

While I don't quite share Tennstedt's views on the first movement-neither did he in sober moments-I love its eccentric unfolding of tempestuous drama morphing into passionate lyricism and ending in glorious optimism. It does of course have its "clunky" moments-its Mahler!
Gielen gives us a swift but not frenetic reading, smoothing over the awkward changes of tempi and mood as well as anyone, and carrying us along on a torrent of glorious sound. He does not pull phrases around as much as Bernstein, is less meandering than Abbado in his superb BPO account and not as hard driven as Solti, and while he brings out strands of detail throughout this and the remaining movements, he does not allow the music to stagnate as Boulez does. With Boulez, detail and structure are revealed as never before, but there is little or no sense of the music itself.
The 2 Nocturnes are glorious, and the Scherzo has the orchestra revelling in Gielen's treatment of its diabolical waltz theme-a true Walpurgisnacht vision.

Gielen attacks the finale with verve, negotiates its awkward turns with aplomb, and brings us to a riotous and joyful conclusion with tam-tam, bells and thunderous percussion caught brilliantly.

The playing throughout is glorious, bordering on the superhuman, and Testament's mastering of the Berlin Radio Digital Master Tapes is as ever exemplary, giving the stings bloom and depth, brilliance and sonority to the brass and of course the woodwind are just glorious, as ever with the BPO.

My favourite recordings of the 7th are Bernstein with the NYPO which in its 24Bit re-mastering in the complete set is astonishing artistically and sonically, Abbado both with the CSO and BPO with the Berlin version just edging it, and best of all Jansons with his magnificent BRSO , who utilises the New Critical Edition to telling effect. Other much loved recordings are Sinopoli's scary deconstructionalist approach with the Philharmonia absolutely galvanised, Bernstein's later Digital NYPO sonically challenged recording, Solti for its sheer exuberance and brilliant playing, Kubelik with the BRSO and Maazel with the VPO. We will pass over the Klemperer even its new 24bit guise!
The scope and scale of interpretational difference across these recordings is perhaps greater than with any of the other Mahler symphonies, demonstrating yet again that there is no clearly defined approach to this glorious music, and this recording joins the ranks among the very best for Gielen's clarity of vision and in elucidating the score, the glorious playing of the orchestra and the excellence of the recording. A fascinating and rewarding experience highly recommended with 5 Stars. Stewart Crowe.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Wow! What a performance. 28 April 2014
By Stephen Grabow - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
While I admire the recordings of Mahler's 7th by Bertini (EMI), Barenboim (Teldec), Tennstedt (EMI), Stenz (Oehms) and Inbal (Denon), this 2013 release by Testament of Michael Gielen's live 1994 recording of the 7th with the Berlin Philharmonic -- quite different from his recorded cycle with SW German Radio on Hanssler -- is a stunner. Within the first few seconds you can feel that this is an emotional interpretation. It grips you immediately. And yet, its clarity is so transparent and the sound so warm that the difficulty of the writing in this most puzzling of Mahler's compositions is completely disarmed. Not only that, but Gielen has found moments of chamber-like magic in some of the orchestral effects that I have never noticed before in any of the other versions mentioned above. To me, there is a certain stand-offish quality to this symphony that Gielen has broken down and made completely approachable. I strongly recommend this wonderful release by Testament.
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