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Symphonie No.9

Radio Symphonieorchester Stuttgart des SWR , Bruckner , Roger Norrington Audio CD
1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: £12.69 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Product details

  • Conductor: Roger Norrington
  • Composer: Bruckner
  • Audio CD (17 Mar 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Haenssler Classics
  • ASIN: B006O8K3K4
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 425,863 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, WAB 109 (original 1894 version, ed. L. Nowak): I. Feierlich, misteriosoSouth West German Radio Symphony Orchestra22:11Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, WAB 109 (original 1894 version, ed. L. Nowak): II. Scherzo: Bewegt, lebhaftSouth West German Radio Symphony Orchestra11:07Album Only
Listen  3. Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, WAB 109 (original 1894 version, ed. L. Nowak): III. Adagio: Langsam feierlichSouth West German Radio Symphony Orchestra18:40Album Only


Product Description

Review

'Excellent sound and, I suppose, good to have as food for thought, which is invariably what Norrington is all about. I'll keep it by me for a while and recommend you do too.' --Gramophone, May 2012

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
The search for the worst Bruckner Ninth in existence continues afresh. It's a congested field. Whatever his limitations might be, Lenny is not the front-runner (Bruckner: Symphony No. 9). Three contestants have broken from the pack in a charge to the finishing line: Bosch, Davis and Sir Woger.

Bosch invites more humour than condemnation in his madcap speeds; perhaps he drank a glut of Red Bull on the day. The Bronze Medal is likely to be his (Bruckner: Sinfonie No. 9 [Hybrid SACD). Sir Colin Davis should have stuck to Berlioz: a Bruckner conductor he ain't. His Ninth is almost lethal in its near-stasis and mindless destruction of inner logic (Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 - Sir Colin Davis / London Symphony Orchestra). His name is likely to be inscribed on the Silver Medal in the very least. That leaves the Befuddled One. The smart money is on him.

If you think it's a good idea to conduct Bruckner as Mendelssohn and furthermore strip him of vibrato, mystery, metaphysics and menace, your search ends here. This is Bruckner as diet-Bruckner if not anti-Bruckner, the Lord of Gehenna.

Observe the front cover. Look into Sir Woger's eyes. Behold his apparel. This is a man who is pleading for a straight-jacket.

Avail him.
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Amazon.com: 1.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars just another distasteful performance 5 July 2014
By Vos - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Norrington here follows the same formula of his Bruckner 4th; make a mockery of the first movement, comatose adagios and zip apart anything in between. The strings are gutless and without conviction. Norringon's interpretation is sardonic and deliberately obfuscatory. The engineers apparently overcompensated for the blattering brass by shoving a microphone down their throats, another challenge HIP orchestras face when performing music they're not supposed to be performing. But the Scherzo doesn't zip quickly as much as it just zips along, with no emotional beginning or end. All in all, a true hanging offence.

I now know that I'm not necessarily opposed to HIP as much as the doltishness of English historiography. Nietzsche was right about the English.
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Knight of the Doleful Performances Rides Forth 22 Aug 2012
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The search for the worst Bruckner Ninth in existence continues afresh. It's a congested field. Whatever his limitations might be, Lenny is not the front-runner (Bruckner: Symphony No. 9). Three contestants have broken from the pack in a charge to the finishing line: Bosch, Davis and Sir Woger.

Bosch invites more humour than condemnation in his madcap speeds; perhaps he drank a glut of Red Bull on the day. The Bronze Medal is likely to be his (Bruckner: Sinfonie No. 9 [Hybrid SACD). Sir Colin Davis should have stuck to Berlioz: a Bruckner conductor he ain't. His Ninth is almost lethal in its near-stasis and mindless destruction of inner logic (Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 - Sir Colin Davis / London Symphony Orchestra). His name is likely to be inscribed on the Silver Medal in the very least. That leaves the Befuddled One. The smart money is on him.

If you think it's a good idea to conduct Bruckner as Mendelssohn and furthermore strip him of vibrato, mystery, metaphysics and menace, your search ends here. This is Bruckner as diet-Bruckner if not anti-Bruckner, the Lord of Gehenna.

Observe the front cover. Look into Sir Woger's eyes. Behold his apparel. This is a man who is pleading for a straight-jacket.

Avail him.
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not worth 20 words 6 May 2013
By Jurgen Lawrenz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I'm supposed to write 20 words for this review; but this recording isn't worth that many words.
Mr Wilks with his erudite comments gives all the conductor all the benefit of the doubt he can muster. But he is too lenient.
Mr O'Hanlon gives the conductor 20 lashes with a steelwire rope. That's lenient compared to what the Inquisition used to mete out!
In their reviews, everything is said that will suffice for the reader's orientation.
3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bruckner Symphony No. 9 Norrington 13 Mar 2012
By E. S. Wilks - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Thankfully, there appear to be fewer editions of Bruckner's Ninth Symphony than his other symphonies, which should make it comparisons easier. Apart from a few versions, almost all offer the 1894 version of this symphony with only the first three movements, because Bruckner left only sketches for the finale. There are, however, several editions, including those by L. Nowak, A. Orel, and B. Cohrs. Four-movement offerings include a 1992 version with the finale, of length 20:19, completed by N. Samale, J. Phillips, B. Cohrs, and G. Mazzuca; and a 2010 version with the finale, of length 22:12, completed by W. Carragan.
If you prefer a four-movement version, then this new CD from Haenssler, with Sir Roger Norrington conducting South West German Radio Symphony Orchestra, won't be your choice. If you prefer a three-movement version, then this CD offers excellent sound quality. Under Sir Roger, the opening, marked Feierlich, misterioso (solemnly, mysterious) is indeed both solemn and mysterious. The measured pace in the Scherzo seems right to me; it is neither too fast (which can make it sound like someone laughing hysterically) nor too slow (which makes it drag), and the central Trio is appropriately light and airy.
I found Sir Roger's version of the Adagio, marked Langsam feierlich (slowly, solemnly), very disappointing. With a timing of 18:11, it is definitely on the fast side compared with others. The performance time of many versions is around 22 minutes, and one version lasts 29 minutes. Perhaps because I am used to the finale being taken more slowly and with more emotion, I found Sir Roger's interpretation of it to be superficial and lacking in charm; thus, I was left with the overall reaction that two well-conducted movements are followed by one that is tossed off as if Sir Roger either doesn't like it or is bored with it.
Ted Wilks
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