Trade in your item
Get a £4.83
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sylvia Plath (Spoken Word) (The spoken Word) Audio CD – Audiobook, 14 Apr 2010


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, Audiobook
"Please retry"
£21.86 £10.99


Free One-Day Delivery for six months with Amazon Student


Product details

  • Audio CD: 1 pages
  • Publisher: The British Library Publishing Division (14 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0712351027
  • ISBN-13: 978-0712351027
  • Product Dimensions: 12.4 x 14 x 1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 288,083 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

bringing together all of her surviving BBC broadcasts [this CD] has been hailed by scholars of the American feminist icon ... for unmasking the real person behind the tragic myth which has developed since her suicide in 1963. --Jonathan Brown, The Independent

astonishingly rare recordings --P Viktor, poet and writer

>[this CD] has been lovingly rescued from oblivion from the archives of BBC broadcasts between 1960 and a month before she killed herself in February 1963. --John Horder, Camden New Journal

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
It's been a long time coming. For British audiences, there have been three key audio releases concerning the US poet Sylvia Plath (1932-1963) up to now: Sylvia Plath Reads (1977/1992), The Poet Speaks (1982/1995), and The Voice of the Poet (1999). But this new CD is special: it contains a previously unreleased live recording of Plath reading a poem in a London theatre, providing listeners with the chance to experience the poet with new, tantalising immediacy. All of her other known poetry recordings occurred in radio studios (usually at the BBC or the British Council). But here, she is introduced by a male host to a live audience and loud applause. She was a relatively unknown poet at the time, more famous as the wife of British poet Ted Hughes than as a writer in her own right.

The Spoken Word CD also contains a 20-minute interview with Plath and Hughes, in which they talk about where they were born, how they met, the differences and similarities between their writing styles, and their placidly domestic life in north London. In contrast to the dark myth that rose about her following her suicide in 1963 aged 30 and which rapidly spread as more and more poems - partly of an unforgiving, terrifying nature, but which also showed sharp wit and humour - came to light, Plath sounds relaxed, chatty and open. In another recording included here, What Made You Stay, Plath is interviewed alone and really comes into her own (it was conducted a month before her marriage collapsed in the wake of Hughes's affair with Assia Wevill).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 21 May 2010
Format: Audio CD
This BBC recording os Sylvia Plath's poetry is very clear and pleasant to hear. It is 73 minutes in duration. Included are two interviews, one with her at-the-time husband Ted Hughes and the second with Sylvia answering the question why she stayed in England. At the end of the recording Plath comments on trends in modern American poetry, including quotes from the work of 6 poets, including Robert Bly and James Merrill--and these are quite brilliant analyses. This was an unexpected bonus! Also, I count 12 individual poems, with individual introductions by Ms. Plath to 8 of them.

Some poets, in my mind, are not as good at reading their poetry as they are in writing it. Consequently, at times I have preferred readings of some works by actors, instead of their poets. This is not the case with Ms. Plath. She reads beautifully and makes her own words, as well as the poetry of others, more easily comprehensible. Her style reminds me, some, of the way Dylan Thomas read his poetry, assertively, powerfully and with little held back.

This recording is among my treasured poetry possessions, for sure.
Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By RR Waller TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Aug. 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Product details and other reviews list the poems and other readings in this selection, so I will not repeat them here. Suffice to say it is an invaluable and rare opportunity to hear Sylvia Plath reading her own work, or discussing its genesis.
Many poets do not read their own (or others') work well. Not so Plath.
Considering the mythology surrounding her life and early death, this is a must for all her readers, a chance to listen to the voice so early stilled and hear the words spoken with the expression the poet wanted.
It does not contain all the poems she wrote and misses out some of her her best, but it is worth the small investment for the general reader and an essential purchase for students of her work..
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By R. Cassells on 14 July 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
While not including readings of her more well known works - no 'Daddy' or 'Lady Lazarus' for example - this collection of BBC recordings does provide an opportunity to hear the poet's voice not just in literal terms but in the sense of gaining an insight into the person behind the words and, perhaps more usefully, to place her works into the context of the time. It is when we hear Plath being introduced as "Mrs. Ted Hughes" that the reality of someone struggling against the confines of being perceived as a 'woman writer' that we get some idea of where her anger and frustration came from. This recording doesn't provide a great insight into Plath's personal demons or what drove her to her creative peak, but it would be useful for anyone wishing to get a better understanding of Plath's works within their social context.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback