The Sword & Sorcery Anthology and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Sword & Sorcery A... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Dispatched from the US -- Expect delivery in 2-3 weeks. Former Library books. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Trade in your item
Get a £0.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Sword & Sorcery Anthology Paperback – 1 Jun 2012

1 customer review

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£10.99
£6.18 £2.15
£10.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Trade In this Item for up to £0.50
Trade in The Sword & Sorcery Anthology for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.50, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Tachyon Publications (1 Jun. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1616960698
  • ISBN-13: 978-1616960698
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.6 x 22.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,208,420 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

"Heroes and their mighty deeds populate the pages of this delightfully kitschy yet absorbing anthology of sword and sorcery short stories from the 1930s onward. Hartwell and Weisman have selected some of the best short-form work in the genre, starting with the originator, Robert E. Howard, and his tales of Conan the Barbarian. The heroes are tough, savvy, and willing to knock a few heads in to get the job done. The soldier of Glen Cook's Dread Empire and Fritz Leiber's Grey Mouser make strong appearances, as does Michael Moorcock's Elric of Melnibone and his dread sword, Stormbringer. Female heroes are as ruthless as their male counterparts: C.L. Moore's Jirel of Joiry walks through Hell and back to get her revenge, while George R. R. Martin's Daenerys Stormborn becomes a true queen by outmaneuvering an entire city of slavers. This is an unbeatable selection from classic to modern, and each story brings its A game." --Publishers Weekly, starred review "The 19 stories in this volume span a time period from 1933 to 2012 and provide a strong introduction to this fantasy subgenre." --Library Journal "Awesome collection, very highly recommended." --Nerds in Babeland "Superbly presented...reignited this reader's interest." --SF Site "A big, meaty collection of genre highlights that runs the gamut from old-school classics to new interpretations, it serves as an excellent introduction and primer in one." --Green Man Review "Hard and fast-paced fantasy that's strong from the first piece right through to the last." --Shades of Sentience "Hartwell and Weisman's choices are top-notch and provide both an excellent introduction to the subgenre for new readers and exciting reading for long-time fans." --Grasping for the Wind "This engaging anthology is a terrific way to meet some of the best fantasists for those unfamiliar with their works and for returning vets a chance to enjoy fun short stories." --Midwest Book Review

About the Author

David G. Hartwell is a senior editor at Tor/Forge Books and the publisher of the New York Review of Science Fiction." He is the author of Age of Wonders, the editor of the anthologies The Dark Descent and The World Treasury of Science Fiction, and the coeditor of two anthologies of the best Canadian science fiction, Northern Stars and Northern Suns. He lives in Pleasantville, New York. Jacob Weisman is the founder, editor, and publisher at Tachyon Publications. His writing has appeared in the Cooper Point Journal, the Nation, Realms of Fantasy, the Seattle Weekly, and in the college textbook, Sport in Contemporary Society. He is the series editor for anthologies including The Secret History of Fantasy, The Urban Fantasy Anthology, and Crucified Dreams: Tales of Urban Horror. He lives in San Francisco.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Manly Reading TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 24 May 2012
Format: Paperback
Although the table of contents is shown in the "Look Inside" extract above, its reproduced here:

"Introduction: Storytellers: A Guided Ramble into Sword and Sorcery Fiction" by David Drake
"The Tower of the Elephant" by Robert E. Howard
"Black God's Kiss" by C. L. Moore
"The Unholy Grail" by Fritz Leiber
"The Tale of Hauk" by Poul Anderson
"The Caravan of Forgotten Dreams" by Michael Moorcock
"The Adventuress" by Joanna Russ
"Gimmile's Song" by Charles R. Saunders
"Undertow" by Karl Edward Wagner
"The Stages of the God" by Ramsey Campbell (writing as Montgomery Comfort)
"The Barrow Troll" by David Drake
"Soldier of an Empire Unacquainted with Defeat" by Glen Cook
"Epistle from Lebanoi" by Michael Shea *
"Become a Warrior" by Jane Yolen
"The Red Guild" by Rachel Pollack
"Six from Atlantis" by Gene Wolfe
"The Sea Troll's Daughter" by Caitlín R. Kiernan
"The Coral Heart" by Jeffrey Ford
"Path of the Dragon" by George R. R. Martin
"The Year of the Three Monarchs" by Michael Swanwick *

The starred stories are new in this anthology: unlike 2010's Swords and Dark Magic, this is largely a reprint anthology, with much of it being (effectively) extracts from books (Howard, Leiber, Moorcock, C. L. Moore, GRRM) and some of it published elsewhere comparatively recently (the Glen Cook and Kiernan stuff). It turns out I had read a lot of this before, and some of it recently. On the other hand, I did enjoy re-reading Leiber and Moorcock, so I'm not complaining. Really, its an all-star cast of 75 years of sword and sorcery: I can honestly say I enjoyed every story.

I wont give a mini-review of 19 stories: it would be faster to just read the book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
A pretty good sword & sorcery primer 24 May 2012
By Manly Reading - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Although the table of contents is shown in the "Look Inside" extract above, its reproduced here:

"Introduction: Storytellers: A Guided Ramble into Sword and Sorcery Fiction" by David Drake
"The Tower of the Elephant" by Robert E. Howard
"Black God's Kiss" by C. L. Moore
"The Unholy Grail" by Fritz Leiber
"The Tale of Hauk" by Poul Anderson
"The Caravan of Forgotten Dreams" by Michael Moorcock
"The Adventuress" by Joanna Russ
"Gimmile's Song" by Charles R. Saunders
"Undertow" by Karl Edward Wagner
"The Stages of the God" by Ramsey Campbell (writing as Montgomery Comfort)
"The Barrow Troll" by David Drake
"Soldier of an Empire Unacquainted with Defeat" by Glen Cook
"Epistle from Lebanoi" by Michael Shea *
"Become a Warrior" by Jane Yolen
"The Red Guild" by Rachel Pollack
"Six from Atlantis" by Gene Wolfe
"The Sea Troll's Daughter" by Caitlín R. Kiernan
"The Coral Heart" by Jeffrey Ford
"Path of the Dragon" by George R. R. Martin
"The Year of the Three Monarchs" by Michael Swanwick *

The starred stories are new in this anthology: unlike 2010's Swords and Dark Magic, this is largely a reprint anthology, with much of it being (effectively) extracts from books (Howard, Leiber, Moorcock, C. L. Moore, GRRM) and some of it published elsewhere comparatively recently (the Glen Cook and Kiernan stuff). It turns out I had read a lot of this before, and some of it recently. On the other hand, I did enjoy re-reading Leiber and Moorcock, so I'm not complaining. Really, its an all-star cast of 75 years of sword and sorcery: I can honestly say I enjoyed every story.

I wont give a mini-review of 19 stories: it would be faster to just read the book. Wagner's "Undertow" really surprised me, for all I could see the ending coming: it was really powerful, with that bitter edge so often found in S&S.

I'd call this an excellent primer for someone starting out in sword & sorcery "low fantasy": there are true classics here, and the stories are fun. Not a lot of deep philosophy, or "cosmic horror", just good, not-so-clean fun. For those interested, there is some representation by women and minorities: all I care about is that they can write a good story. You could argue that Saunders' "Gimmile's Song" is one of the best in the book, and it is certainly not your standard quasi-European setting and hero (African, and heroine, respectively).

The only quibble I have with the book is the lack of an introductory page on each contributor: this is kind of standard in anthologies, and while you can use Wikipedia, you should not have to. Yes, that's gravy the book is missing, not meat and potatoes, but it is a lack. But even with no gravy, it's a good meal.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
entertaining collection 17 Jun. 2012
By Harriet Klausner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This entertaining twenty story collection contains entries starting in the 1930s from every decade since except the 1950s; including two tales never published before ("The Year of Three Monarchs" by Michael Swanwick and "Epistle from Lebanoi" by Michael Shea). . The entries represent a who's who of fantasy though some of the contributions are at best loosely sword and sorcery (David Drake's 1970s "The Barrow Troll" feels more like horror fantasy, but still is a super pre military sci fi work by the author). This engaging anthology is a terrific way to meet some of the best fantasists for those unfamiliar with their works and for returning vets a chance to enjoy fun short stories. In the introduction David Drake makes the case that Robert E. Howard's Conan success created S&S as a genre and deserves the opening act with "Tower of the Elephant". The other 1930s contribution comes from the great C.L. Moore (see "Black God's Kiss). Other famous authors included are Glen Cook's 1980 Dread Empire tale (see "Soldier of an Empire Unacquainted with Defeat"), Fritz Leiber's 1962 "The Unholy Grail" starring Fafhad and Grey Mouser, Michael Moorcock's Elric (and Stormbringer) in "The Caravan of Forgotten Dreams, and the current top gun George R.R. Martin with his 2000 "Path of the Dagon". Readers will appreciate this strong compilation.

Harriet Klausner
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Great anthology 25 Jun. 2014
By Zach - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not sure why so few reviews are here, so I'll add one for an solid anthology that includes a good sampling of authors over the past 100 years. As with all collections, not every story worked for me, but enough did for me to recommend it. A few highlights:

Starts off appropriately with a Robert E. Howard story, "The Tower of the Elephant".

"The Cave of Forgotten Dreams" by Michael Moorcock was an excellent adventure.

My favorite story by far was Charles R. Saunders' "Gimmile's Song", probably because it is anti-cliche: a heroine instead of a hero; a faithful war-bull instead of a horse; and a African background instead of the traditional European perspective. This is my first exposure to this author despite that he has been around for quite awhile, and I was definitely impressed.

"Soldier of an Empire Unacquainted with Defeat" by Glen Cook was a delightful read of almost novella length.

"Become a Warrior" by Jane Yolen is a disturbing tale of the cold calculations a women bent on revenge is capable of.

I found "The Sea Troll's Daughter" by Caitlin R. Kiernan to be more sexually restrained than some other stories I've read by this author, and I thought it made her story-telling better and more enjoyable.

Finally, "The Path of the Dragon" by George R.R. Martin was suprisingly good. I know he is all the rage now, but I tried to read one of his books years ago and was unimpressed. I assumed he had been included to help sell the book, but was delighted to find that I actually enjoyed his prose.
A good selection of authors and stories. 28 Aug. 2014
By Julie Drucker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I picked this book up on a whim because I was able to buy it as a used book. I don't read a lot of anthologies because I like the stories to be longer so you can feel like you are a part of the story. I have to say that I did enjoy the vast majority of the stories in this anthology and it gave me the opportunity to view some authors that I had not previously read. It will give you a good variety of writing styles to help you find the style of writing that you like the most. Kudos to the group of editors for putting together a well rounded selection of authors that makes this anthology have a smooth flow from story to story.
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
A mixed bag 23 Sept. 2012
By Joel Sanet - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Like most anthologies this one is a mixed bag, some good stories, some not so good. Of the 19 in this book, about half were positive reading experiences and half were unmemorable or even poorly written. Two were outstanding (Gimmile's Songs and Soldier of an Empire Unacquainted with Defeat) and two were nearly unreadable (Black God's Kiss and The Stages of the God). If I could I would give this anthology 3.5 stars.

Gimmile's Songs by Charles R. Saunders relates an encounter between a female black warrior with a supernatural being in Nyumbani, Saunders' alternate history version of Africa. I liked it well enough that I'm tempted to try his novel Imaro. Glen Cook's Soldier is the longest story in the book (68 pages). It's the first Cook story that I've read and I must say that I was impressed. It's very well-written and also has an unusual amount of character development and human drama for a S&S story. More novels to buy!

Black God's Kiss is a classic of the field. C.L. Moore's Jirel of Joiry broke the mold of the pulps by being a female warrior. Unfortunately it shows it's age. Purple prose may have been in vogue in the '30's but it just comes across as silly today. Most of the 30 pages is a description of a rather boring journey through the Underworld in search of revenge. I almost didn't finish it. Ramsay Campbell's Stages was published in a fanzine early in the author's career (1974) and it shows.

I bought this anthology because it has a novella about Daenerys Targaryen in it. I was hoping it was a side story in George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series but, alas, it was only a section of one of the novels (the 3rd, I think) so Path of the Dragon was a disappointment.

What do I say about Joanna Russ's The Adventuress? I really enjoyed the writing but the plot was trivial. A princess runs away from home, sails across the sea, kills a few bad guys, and lands on an island filled with hunks. Really.

IMO the following stories are all worth reading:

R.E. Howard's Tower of the Elephant is the oldest story in the book (Weird Tales, March 1933). One of the better Conan stories. The Cimmerian sets out to steal some jewels and winds up saving an alien from beyond time and space from an evil sorcerer. Oh, and of course he fights a giant spider along the way. Corny, maybe, but fun.

In Poul Anderson's The Tale of Hauk a Viking village is ravaged by an undead warrior.

The Barrow Troll by David Drake is another Viking tale. Ulf enlists an unwilling priest to help get the troll's treasure. But do trolls really exist?

In Jane Yolen's Become a Warrior a princess seeks revenge on the murderers of her family.

In Six from Atlantis a survivor of the city's destruction encounters a bunch of babes and a giant ape-god who isn't pleased with our hero. Sounds like a B-movie, doesn't it, but with Gene Wolfe writing, it works.

The Sea Troll's Daughter is my 3rd favorite story. A hard-drinking swordswoman saves a village from the ravages of a sea troll, but the daughter may be even worse than the father. This is the first story I've read by Caitlin R. Kiernan, another name to watch out for.

And now for a couple of disappointments:

The Unholy Grail by Fritz Leiber is a Fafhrd and Gray Mouser story without Fafhrd. Could they have picked a more boring title from that series?

In Moorcock's The Caravan of Forgotten Dreams, Elric and Moonglum save Elric's paradise with the fair Zarozinia from an invasion of bad guys. I enjoyed the Elric series when I read it thirty years ago, but this one just didn't click with me.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback