Swimming Home: Shortlisted for Man Booker Prize 2012 and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£15.20
  • RRP: £15.31
  • You Save: £0.11 (1%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Swimming Home (Unabridged... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Swimming Home (Unabridged Audiobook) Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged

125 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£15.20
£9.01 £7.50
£15.20 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.



Product details

  • Audio CD: 4 pages
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audiobooks; Unabridged Audiobook 4 CDs edition (1 Oct. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1471216780
  • ISBN-13: 978-1471216787
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.6 x 14.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (125 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 395,697 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'Deborah Levy's storytelling is allusive, elliptical and disturbing. Her touch is gentle, often funny and always acute... This is a prizewinner.' --The Independent

A stealthily devastating book ... Levy manipulates light and shadow with artfulness. She transfixes the reader ... This is an intelligent, pulsating literary beast. --The Daily Telegraph

'Swimming Home is as sharp as a wasp sting' --Sunday Times

Book Description

Swimming Home by Deborah Levy, shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2012. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

103 of 116 people found the following review helpful By Sue Kichenside TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback
I know that I am swimming against the tide here but reviews are personal - and personally, I didn't like this book (actually, more of a novella) one bit.

The writing is pretentious, riddled with symbolism, and the characters are impossible to warm to. Fortunately, the reader doesn't have to spend too much time in their company. I disagree with other reviewers about the book being light on plot. If anything, I found it plot-heavy for the ephemeral style of writing. But I do agree with J. M. Gardner who found echoes of Martin Amis's The Pregnant Widow. If you like middle-aged, middle-class people sitting round a swimming pool discussing - or actually, not discussing but thinking about their varying degrees of angst, then maybe this is a book that will appeal to you. And talking of swimming pools, here was a point about the book that jarred for me from the outset. The pool at the South of France villa where two couples and the teenage daughter of one of the couples is spending the summer is green. It is described on page 5 as being "more like a pond". For me, this was a complete deal-breaker in terms of credibility right there. There is NO WAY anybody is going to put up with a dirty pool on a long-term summer holiday villa let. It may sound a trivial point but I just knew from that point that I was never going to believe in these people. Here is the cast list:

Joe, devoted father of the teenager, famous poet, serial philanderer and guilty Holocaust survivor.
Wife, Isabel, successful war correspondent who has put her career before her daughter.
Mitchell, unsuccessful seller of bric-a-brac, foodie and gun-collector.
His wife, Laura, a giant of a woman and potentially the most interesting character of the lot, but woefully underwritten.
Read more ›
11 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Ninakelly on 11 Nov. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
who found it impossible to see why this novel was short-listed for the Booker. Poorly written, unconvincing and pretentious ...the book reads like a preliminary sketch for a novel with characters barely realized, half-created to illustrate some historical or psychological point - the worst of these being the 'poet' Jozef Jacobs as a child abandoned by his parents in Poland during the war (embarrassing in comparison with, for example Anne Michaels' Fugitive Pieces) - and the supposedly beautiful and enigmatic Kitty Finch who succeeds only in being profoundly irritating. Tom McCarthy praises Deborah Levy in part because she knows her Lacan, Barthes, Deleuze etc etc - all I can say is that they have done her no service whatsoever. I have never written an Amazon review before but this book, and the way it has been hyped, made me so angry that I went straight online to do so ... and OK, I may be a pedantic teacher of English, but the use of 'like' in place of 'as if' is unforgivable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Megan Davies on 4 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Swimming Home is Deborah Levy's latest contemporary novel using European Modernism, alongside British Realism to develop the dark storyline behind Kitty Finch's poem which is also the title of the book. Levy is well known for her plays and poetry whilst also having written novels such as Beautiful Mutants and Billy Girl, which were great successes.

It is set in the French Riviera following the lives of five tourists who rent a villa for a week, in the summer of July 1994. From the opening sentence, "When Kitty Finch took her hand off the steering wheel and told him she loves him, he no longer knew if she was threatening him or having a conversation." We are thrown into the mysterious, erratic actions of Kitty Finch, the central protagonist. She arrives unannounced, pretending she got the dates when she was supposed to stay wrong. However she is actually besotted by Joe Jacobs and is determined for him to read her poem. He is a famous poet who is often unfaithful to his wife, Isabel Jacobs, a war reporter. Nina, their teenage daughter, has learned not to care about her mother's lack of presence. We see her develop from a child into a young woman throughout the week, developing both physically and mentally. She understands the hidden meaning behind Kitty's poem, something the adults fail to do.

Mitchell and his wife Laura have become bankrupt and struggle to accept the failure of their business. Madeline Sheridan is a woman living next door to the villa, who left her husband and medical career behind in England to move to France. Unfortunatly early on in her stay she found an unstable Kitty wandering Nice, naked and alone and felt obliged to take action, something Kitty resents her for and now tries to make her life a misery.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Walter M. Holmes on 14 Nov. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It seems unusual for an author to provide helpful notes to her latest novel but in a recent "Guardian" Deborah Levy writes of some key influences on her book. These include Apollinaire, Baudelaire, Scott Fitzgerald, European modernism, British realism, and the film version of John Cheever's The Swimmer. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie and Le Mépris are other movies mentioned. In a later essay she states her admiration for Lee Miller. Of course not all of the above will appeal but it is clear that Ms Levy and this reader at least have some common ground!
Having set the bar so high it is fair to ask if the novel comes up to expectations. The writing, setting, pacing, and plotting are impeccable. The characters depicted are rather uncomfortable and some are downright disagreeable. The heroine, Kitty Finch, is pretty dodgy and the poet Joe, who she apparently admires, is almost as unsavoury as the other guests in the villa are. Deliberately the author creates a constant atmosphere of discord and unease. Mental instability is just about held in check. The total superficial façade is underpinned by Sartre's 'bad faith'.
The novel is short and intense, of high quality, and packs a great deal into its small space. But the redeeming vices and human failings of the characters seem lacking in any charm; while for me the heroine offered more of a threat than a promise. Warmth, I suspect, was not what its author intended and here her eye for humanity seems to be a cold one.
That said I recognise that this is a novel that holds up a mirror to the self, and that any distortion of vision may come from within. This is a very perceptive work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback