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Sweet Tea

11 customer reviews

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Music

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Biography

After decades of paying dues, Buddy Guy has emerged as the most heralded bluesman of his generation, a hugely influential guitarist and passionate, dynamic live performer. But Buddy started as a sideman, and toiled in the Chicago clubs for a decade before beginning his march to worldwide fame.

Buddy began as a sideman in Baton Rouge, playing primarily with the late Raful Neal (father of ... Read more in Amazon's Buddy Guy Store

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Product details

  • Audio CD (14 May 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Silvertone
  • ASIN: B00005I9SZ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 204,846 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By andyc@croftsa.freeserve.co.uk on 26 Jun. 2001
Format: Audio CD
This album came out so quietly, I didn't know it existed until I saw it on here by accident. Shame on whoever distributes it over here. Contrary to the mischeiviously-wrongfooting opening track (Done Got Old, a Hooker-esque acoustic ramble), Buddy Guy seems to be getting younger with each release. The guitar playing on here is thunderous, innovative and extraordinarily skilful. Ok, the songs rarely get above the level of an early Zep/later Hendrix blues workout, but this is some workout. This is electric blues guitar at its absolute best; I'd recommend this to jaundiced old-timers or equally to kids who think you have to be young to play the guitar. And a certain Mr Clapton should listen to this album and reflect on his own recent tepid releases...
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Milt M. R. Ingarfield on 11 Jun. 2004
Format: Audio CD
For this recording session Buddy Guy has returned to his roots and used a recording studio called Sweet Tea, the Oxford, Mississippi studio, is also owned by the producer of this album, one Dennis Herring. For this session Mr Herring has assembled an extraordinary band of black Mississippi veterans in the shape of Spam on Drums and Sam Carr also on drums along with some younger white players Jimbo Mathus on rhythm guitar on bass Davey Faragher and another drummer in the form of Pete Thomas.
The opening track of this 2001 recording finds Buddy half-singing and half-muttering while he picks out the tune of the song "Done got old".

With the opening line of the track proclaiming "well, I done got old, can't do the things I used to, cause I'm a old man, and I'm not the same". As the song ends on the line "I'm a very old man" and the strumming of his acoustic guitar fades into the distance you get the impression that this going to be a laid-back country blues album.

As the snare drum of "Baby please don't leave Me" played by Spam is heard with the bass player Davey Faragher counting 1, 2, that impression is soon dispelled as the dirtiest sounding bass with the slackest strings is heard along with the incendiary guitar playing of Buddy Guy who is singing "Oh baby please".

This pounding riff whish is basically the whole song distorts and bends it's way for buddy to play a relentless solo in the middle to great effect, making the track a wall of thumping bass and riffs that ends with the sound of controlled feedback.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Pete on 22 Sept. 2002
Format: Audio CD
"Well I done got old, can't do the things I used to do" declares Buddy in the opening words of this album. He sounds it as well in the solo acoustic ramble that marks the start of this latest offering. A tired old man with a guitar mourning his happier past. Yet as the final notes die away to be replaced by a heavy, rolling combination of drums and bass Buddy proves he's not quite past it yet.
Buddy's back, and back on form as well, with this excellent collection of tracks utilising material mostly lifted from that punkiest of blues labels, Fat Possum. A leap away from the slick studio twelve bars, and celebrity backslapping jams that have characterised Guy's work since his early nineties revival the album taps into the raw sound of the Mississippi hill country blues of the area around Oxford, MS, where it was recorded.
Yet while the records of Junior Kimbrough (who has more songwriting credits on the album than even Guy himself) sound as if the last 50 years never took place, Buddy's album still shows that charactistic Guy quality of being influenced not just by those who came before him, but by those who followed as well. Guy's guitar playing still holds those hints of Hendrix and SRV that prove he didn't stop buying records with his first appearance on Chess in the 50s. The seven minute, one chord jam of 'Baby Please Don't Leave Me' is reminiscent of Led Zeppelin's version of the Memphis Minnie song 'When the Levee Breaks', however it manages to retain an authenticity that the Englishmen never managed.
By combining the primitive sounds of North Mississippi with his usual commercial Chicago based widdling Guy might just have made his best album yet. Hopefully it won't stand alone among his consistent but often formulaic recent offerings.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Russell D. Barton on 17 Mar. 2002
Format: Audio CD
Power Guitar, loud, raw, heavy music, a stadium filler.
Led Zeppelin? Eric Clapton? U2?
No, a 65 year old man who shows on this album that he is at the top of his form and would gleefully blast anyone off the stage.
I have just had the good fortune to be able to play this album loud and it is as good as any blues I have heard in 25 years of listening.
If you only buy one album this year make it this one and play it LOUD!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Andy P, Broughton Astley on 1 Dec. 2005
Format: Audio CD
Of all the albums I have in my collection, this one that stands out as perhaps my favourite blues recording. It vies for top spot with Albert King and SRV's "In Session" though the two are totally different in style and character. "In session" is based around the familiar 12 bar blues, albeit featuring some of the best of the genre I have ever heard. Sweet Tea, on the other hand, couldn't be more different. It blows that tradition clean out of the water. This is the album that the phrase deep, down and dirty was invented for.
What Buddy has done, is to strip and disassemble the music down to its most basic ingredients in order to recapture the fundamental spirit underlying black music. The result is an album that taps down to the primordial blues core in us all. Sweet Tea actively engages you, taking you over, body and soul before lifting you to another dimension.
It is raw, uncompromising, distorted and totally over the top, yet somehow it hangs together, capturing the very essence of what blues is really about. It is often said that the blues is the Devil's music and if it's true, then ol' Lucifer can have my soul for nothing. I may end up in hell for saying it but all of my friends will be there and we'll have a ball listening to Sweet Tea in the elevator on the way down. Forget the overproduced albums of the 80's and 90's; this is the real thing.
"I Done Got Old" written by Junior Kimbrough, kicks the album off in a melancholy mood with Buddy reflecting on reaching the milestone of 65. Quiet, soulful and moving it may be, but when he says he "can't do the things I used to do", don't you believe it.
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