£6.98 + £1.26 delivery
In stock. Sold by nagiry
Quantity:1

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£6.98
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: zoreno-uk
Add to Basket
£6.98
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: marvelio-uk
Add to Basket
£6.99
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: trec002
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sweet Liberty
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Sweet Liberty


Price: £6.98
Only 15 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by nagiry.
14 new from £6.98 14 used from £5.22
£6.98 Only 15 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by nagiry.

Amazon's Cara Dillon Store

Music

Image of album by Cara Dillon

Photos

Image of Cara Dillon

Biography

Cara Dillon has a rare talent that you only come across a handful times in your whole life. Her staggeringly beautiful voice has the ability to reach inside the soul of a song and imbue material with not only profound sweetness but also poignancy and depth.

Born in Dungiven in 1975 she was brought up in a close musical family immersed in the rich cultural heritage of her native Co. ... Read more in Amazon's Cara Dillon Store

Visit Amazon's Cara Dillon Store
for 6 albums, photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Sweet Liberty + Cara Dillon + Hill of Thieves
Price For All Three: £26.77

These items are dispatched from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Jan. 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rough Trade Records
  • ASIN: B0000AQVEL
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 108,680 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. High Tide
2. The Winding River Roe
3. Everywhere
4. There Were Roses
5. Where Are You
6. The Gem Of The Roe
7. Bonny Bonny
8. Erin The Green
9. Broken Bridges
10. Falling Like A Star
11. Standing On The Shore
12. The Emigrant's Farewell

Product Description

Product Description

Cara Dillon's 2001 debut was a remarkably assured collection and justifiably acclaimed. Although mainly traditional tunes, it was nevertheless infused with a modern sensibility and artful, understated arrangements courtesy of personal and professional partner Sam Lakeman. Of course, all this would have not have mattered without Dillon's crystalline, angelic voice, an instrument of rare beauty capable of melting the sternest of hearts. Unsurprisingly, Sweet Liberty is basically more of the same, which should please Cara's many fans.This time, however, Cara and Sam have cut down on the traditional tracks and begun to exercise what amounts to a considerable song writing muscle. The praise for the self penned ''Blue Mountain River'' has obviously inspired them to put pen to paper once more. Their originals sit happily alongside the traditional, reinforcing the debt they owe it while pointing to a distinct musical identity of their own. Also included is the beguiling version of Tommy Sands' ''There Were Roses'', best known from Billy Connolly's most recent television series, plus a cover of Johnny Moynihan and Terry Woods' ''Standing on the Shore'', made famous by Anne Briggs. The latter is particularly poignant, floating on a delicate drone and understated percussion. Sam Lakeman's piano lines still ripple magically throughout, while his brother Seth adds his usual assured fiddle flourishes. Sam's arrangements never overwhelm Cara's vocals, but are certainly more assured than on the debut. Sometimes echoing the experimentalism of the pair's days with Equation, they make use of a wide range of instrumental textures. As you would expect, the playing is faultless throughout. Occasionally, as on ''Broken Bridges'', the combination is stunning, as Cara's ethereal vocals entwine over a shifting bed of drums, whistle and harmonium to remarkable effect. After one of the most rapturously received solo debuts by any folk artist, 'Sweet Liberty' comes with a lot of expectations. It's no great surprise then that Cara Dillon and partner/producer Sam Lakeman haven't strayed far from the formula that made Dillon such a success. Although there's less reliance on traditional songs, this new album uses many of the same musicians and sticks to similarly sparse crystalline arrangements that periodically build into crescendos, but neatly avoid bombast by subsiding gracefully just when they should. A big part of Dillon's appeal lies in her girlish voice (similar to Kate Bush with a Derry brogue) and the fact that she often chooses material that has strong connections with her roots - "The Gem Of The Roe" and "The Winding River Roe" being two fine examples. Such songs have usually stood the test of time as a result of distinctive melodies and it takes courage to juxtapose them with original material, as Sweet Liberty does with success. (Jon Lusk)

Amazon.co.uk

After one of the most rapturously received solo debuts by any folk artist, Sweet Liberty comes with a lot of expectations. It's no great surprise then that Cara Dillon and partner/producer Sam Lakeman haven't strayed far from the formula that made Dillon such a success. Although there's less reliance on traditional songs, this new album uses many of the same musicians and sticks to similarly sparse crystalline arrangements that periodically build into crescendos, but neatly avoid bombast by subsiding gracefully just when they should.

A big part of Dillon's appeal lies in her girlish voice (similar to Kate Bush with a Derry brogue) and the fact that she often chooses material that has strong connections with her roots--"The Gem of the Roe" and "The Winding River Roe" being two fine examples. Such songs have usually stood the test of time as a result of distinctive melodies and it takes courage to juxtapose them with original material, as Sweet Liberty does with a fair degree of success. While "Everywhere" and "Broken Bridges" pass this test, it's unlikely that "Where Are You" and "Falling like A Star" will be remembered as classics in years to come. Even so, the latter seems worthy of inclusion for its apparently autobiographical content, which could easily be interpreted as a comment on early days in the failed folk "supergroup" The Equation. The mix of five original compositions (up from only two on Cara Dillon), five arrangements of traditional songs and two covers seems judicious, especially given the fine reading of Tommy Sands' affecting anti-sectarian lament "There Were Roses". But it does beg questions about exactly how hard that "difficult third album" will be. --Jon Lusk

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua VINE VOICE on 11 Nov. 2003
Format: Audio CD
The second solo release from the one-time All-Ireland Singing Champion and former member of Oige. As with Cara's first release, husband Sam and brother-in-law Seth both play on this album, and sister Mary once again provides backing vocals. Recorded in Somerset, Sam is also listed the album's producer.
Cara's first album featured only three songs that weren't traditional tunes. With Sweet Liberty, the mix is slightly different - five of the twelve tracks are traditional, five are written by Cara and Sam, with the remaining two having been written by others. One of these songs is "There Were Roses", written by the legendary Tommy Sands. Cara initially recorded it for use on a BBC TV show called "Billy Connolly's World Tour of England, Ireland and Wales". After the episode featuring the track was broadcast, the message boards on Cara's website were virtually flooded (pun entirely intended !) with demands that this song be released. There's no doubt that it will be one of the highlights of the album for many people - it is superbly delivered.
For me, the highlights of this album are - as with her first release - the traditional songs. "The Winding River Roe", which gives a nod to Cara's hometown of Dungiven, features only Cara's voice and Sam tinkling the keyboards. Cara's delivery is so good on this track, I couldn't help wondering why the song hadn't been recorded unaccompanied. Running it close for my Song of the Album award is "The Emigrant's Farewell". One of the songs on the album to benefit from Brian Finnegan's flute playing, it also sees Liam O'Maonlai joining Mary on backing vocals. Liam, of course, is better known as the lead singer of the Hothouse Flowers.

The album opens with "High Tide", one of the songs Sam and Cara wrote themselves.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Geoffrey M. Teece on 14 Oct. 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
On first hearing, this album didn't seem as good as the superb 'Cara Dillon' but after constant playing and having the luxury of seeing and hearing these songs performed live, I would now rate this record as good as anything produced this year. It is beautifully sung, played and produced. Cara Dillon and Sam Lakeman make a fantastic partnership. The traditional songs are all excellent with 'Erin the Green', for me, the most beautiful (almost sacred in its beauty). The self-penned songs (5 of them) tend to grow on you with personal favourites being 'High Tide'. 'Falling Like a Star' and the brilliant 'Where Are You?'-this latter song has a tremendous arrangement as well as lovely shifts in tempo and mood-brilliant.
As I am old!! I can only compare the excitement of this fledgling career to that of first hearing Mary Black around the time of her 'By the Time it Gets Dark' album. The two are quite unalike in many ways but there is the same excitement, for me anyway, of an artist coming out of the folk tradition in new and exciting ways
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By John on 5 Nov. 2003
Format: Audio CD
We unfortunately live in a world where our music seems to be going the same way as our food. Fast, rehashed, unimaginative and ultimately unfulfilling. But just when I was about to give up and turn my back on McMusic I stumbled by accident, across a review of a Cara Dillon concert. It got me interested enough to visit her web site and listen to the sample tracks. I quickly bought this and her debut album and was lucky enough to see her in concert recently. It was simply a priviledge to hear her live.
I know my clumsy review could never do justice to Cara's exquisite voice and beautiful music but I am doing my best to spread the word. This album could easily come with a money back guarantee, it's that good! Do yourself a big favour and buy it, then tell your friends to buy it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael Shaw on 29 Sept. 2003
Format: Audio CD
I have been a fan of Cara Dillon since her first album. She has one of the purest voices I have ever heard. This Album is as good as the last.
The production is superb, and her and Sam must be very proud that they are still producing such high quality stuff. This kind of thing puts to shame all those talent-less want to-be's on Pop Idol. She will never earn as much, or achieve their fame levels. But she remains true to her roots, and the music benefits from that.
Her version of "There were Roses" stood out in the Billy Connolly's tour of England, Ireland and Wales. And fits in brilliantly on this Album, simple, subtle, poignant and beautiful.
"The Winding River Roe" harks back to her roots in Northern Ireland, and is just awesome (I have heard her sing it live and am so glad it is on this Album)
Buy this Album, and you will never regret it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Oct. 2003
Format: Audio CD
Cara Dillon is a fantastic live artist. Whether with the Lakeman brothers or on the present tour with her expanded set of musicians she delivers her songs with a depth and clarity that sets her apart. Her first studio album was haunting in its simplicity relying mainly on traditional songs laid sparce to illuminate her unique vocal style. This new album represents a move towards a fuller sound and includes several self penned songs. It still retains a deceptive simplicity but is augmented by superb musicianship and strong songs. Whilst never reaching the heights of her live performances it is an album well worth buying. Go see her live, if you can, but buy this anyway - you won't be disappointed!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback