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Surrender to the Will of the Night (Instrumentalities of the Night) [Mass Market Paperback]

Glen Cook
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
RRP: 4.83
Price: 4.79 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Surrender to the Will of the Night (Instrumentalities of the Night) + Lord of the Silent Kingdom (Instrumentalities of the Night) + The Tyranny of the Night (Instrumentalities of the Night)
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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 648 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; Reprint edition (Nov 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765345986
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765345981
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 10.7 x 2.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 583,191 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best ...... 16 Jan 2011
By Dil
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I have been a massive Glen Cook fan for as long as I can remember and have read everything of that I can obtain (including the "one offs" like the Dragon Never Sleeps and Sung in Blood"). This series is as good as anything that he has ever written.

We have been a bit "stylistically" conditioned as to what to expect from him by the Black Company - which I rate as one of the "all time great" series, rightly defined as changing the nature of this type of fiction. This series is different, but shaping up to be as good as the original. Without trying to second guess the approach, I get the sense that some of it is trying to address things that he would like to have done with the Dark Company, including a rather deeper analysis of the interplay between personalities and, indeed, some of the personality dysfunctions that quite often come to dominate actions.

I can't quite get a take on the historiocal period it is based on (albeit loosely) - in fact I suspect that it is actually based on "blurring through" a relatively long time period rather than allegorical to a specific set of events. However, it seems to reside around late Holy Roman Empire, Italian City State, Turkish imperial power, Mameluke times - but has characters drawn from other periods (i.e. Saladdin - which I know is not the correct spelling) and introduces rather more effective gunpowder artillery and, of course, magical disciplines. It is almost, but not really, an alternative history type book. All-in-all I love it!!

My only complaint is that its a long time between periods (I seem to recall the Black Company books coming quicker, which may be my memory misleading me) but each volume of this series is much denser and, I suspect, requires rather more research and validation to fit within a coherent framework.
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Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Having read through the black company series and then the dread empire books, I was looking forward to more of the same quality. This series has a wide range of characters and at times incomprehensible geography. A map or glossary of characters would make it so much easier to understand the politics and tensions between religions and kingdoms. I can see the parallels with the papacy, holy roman empire, middle east etc but the editor could have made it much more readable. I'll still complete the series, and it's getting easier to understand by book 2 but I think this is one for the Glen Cook enthusiast.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Rewards reading closely 28 Nov 2011
By John Middleton TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
This is not the place to start reading Glen Cook, or even the Instrumentalities of the Night series: its book 3 of a planned 4 volume series which is densely plotted and involves a lot of jaw-breaking names. If you want to try Glen Cook, start with The Black Company or Garrett PI (depending how much humor you like). I think that this "Night" series is closest in spirit to the Black Company of all the other Cook stuff I have read, so if you liked that, you will probably like this.

This is the continuing story of Piper Hecht, commander of the armies of the Brothen, locked in a tussel with the Pramans over the Holy Land where the magical Wells of Ihrian are failing. However, Piper Hecht is in fact Else Tage, the Praman Sha-Lug janissary captain on a secret mission to the West. Except that's not his real name either, and his Western family have recovered him, and they all turn out to be sorcerors who have congress with the Night (ie various demons, devils, spirits, imps and gods). Confused yet? You will be. And that's the background of the last few books, not any of this one.

Like all the Night series, it's a struggle to get through the first 50 pages, but after that it all starts to make a little sense. While the focus is on Piper Hects and his godslaying antics, it now widens to include his family, including his sister Heris, who may turn out to eclipse Piper in all of this. We also get to see the continuing diversions in the Connec, largely via Brother Candle, a Maysaylean Perfect who tends to have strange things happen around him, and also the disputed Holy Land, via an old friend of Piper's.

There are major quests, political disputes at 30 paces, changes of employment, requited but infulfilled love and unwanted unrequited intercourse.
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  19 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Solid, not outstanding 4 Dec 2010
By Kenneth C. Warren - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
After waiting a couple of years for the 3rd book I think my expectations might have gotten a little too high for this one. Don't get me wrong, this is still Cook at his best but something seemed to be missing in this one. I liked "Lord of the Silent Kingdom" better than the first book and expected "Surrender" to surpass book number 2. Unfortunately this was not the case and I'd have to describe this installment as 'satisfactory.'

Like I said, Cook is still writing wonderfully and this book was the page turner that all of his works seem to be. Yet something was lacking and I'm having trouble putting my finger on it. Perhaps its the fact that he has too many POVs; the chapters on Piper and Februaren/Heris was exciting and satisfying but the chapters dealing with Nassim were dull and (unless Cook unveils something big in book #4) didn't seem to be that relevant to the overall plot. I've been surprised by Cook's plot twists before and hopefully he's doing a little sleight of hand and misdirection to set his readers up for a big finish with the last book. If Cook holds to form then readers can expect lots of main and secondary character's deaths in book 4--the holocaust of characters in the last book of the Black Company series left my jaw on the floor.

Overall "Surrender to the Will of the Night" is solid but not outstanding. I know Mr. Cook juggles lots of series' at once (Garrett, new Black Company Books!, and this series) but hopefully he'll focus in on book #4 of this series and give it the finish it deserves.

PS: Highly recommend Cook's other series': Black Company, Dread Empire, Garrett P.I., Darkwar.
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ambitious and flawed, rewarding but frustrating, weak 4 30 Nov 2010
By B. Capossere - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Surrender to the Will of the Night is Glen Cook's third book in his Instrumentalities of the Night series, and despite its great potential, shares some of the same flaws as its two predecessors.

There are several major plot strands braided together. One involves Piper Hecht's growing entanglement with the Grail Empire, headed by Empress Katrin, who wishes to hire Piper away from the Patriarch's army and make him commander of her new Righteous Army, which she plans to send on crusade to rid the Holy Lands of the Praman's. Luckily for her, upheaval in the Patriarchal hierarchy may make Piper free to consider her request (Piper's attraction to Katrin's sister Helspeth doesn't hurt). Speaking of the Holy Lands and the Praman, a secondary plot involves an attempt by Indala al-Sul Halaladin to unify the Praman into a single kaifate, ending their internecine warfare/raiding and freeing them to focus on liberate the Holy Lands in a counter-crusade. Meanwhile, parallel to all this is a magical battle by Cloven Februaren (the "Ninth Unknown") and Piper's sister Heris against Kharoulke the Windwalker, one of the most powerful and worst Instrumentality. And, as usual in this series, there are a host of other "meanwhile's" one could add.

The most captivating plot I thought involved the book-length campaign against Kharoulke, in which Februaren and Heris have to enter another world, enlist the aid of long-vanished dwarves, find a way across the rainbow bridge into the castle of the gods, etc. The plot-line itself was interesting and enlivened by the entry of Norse mythology fully into the storyline, an entry made more complex and rich by the clash of that mythology and traditional magic with the increasingly sophisticated technology beginning to be deployed in this world. This plot strand is also less bogged down by details of geography, political influence, genealogy, and other sometimes overwhelming or dry details that hinder the other storylines somewhat. But the largest reason I found this plot most enjoyable though was due to those involved. Februaren, Heris, the Ascendant, and one of the leading dwarves all have very distinctive, vibrant narrative voices, and so the story seemed to come alive whenever we switched back to this group.
The plot involving Piper's growing estrangement from the Patriarchy and entanglement with the Grail Empire I found less compelling. One reason is those dry and sometimes overwhelming details of politics, geography, and genealogy. Another is I never had a sense it wasn't going to go where it did, so I felt I was reading all these machinations and details simply to get to where I knew I was going anyway. And truth be told, though he's the main character, I find Piper's character curiously flat, considering his history. His interactions with his comrades are trademark Cook, wry and gritty, but and when we spend some quality time with him he's an engaging character, but too often he (and thus we) are getting thrown so much information, or being whirled so quickly from place to place or plot to plot, that it loses some emotional depth.

The Praman sub-plot is similarly a bit flat, feeling at times more like reportage to just keep us up to date as to what's happening in that part of the world, though it does have its moments, especially when Nassim Alizarin, one of the major players, deals with one of his more unpleasant commands. Brother Candle, from the earlier books, returns here but in somewhat perfunctory fashion, mostly being a conduit for some legal papers. His is probably the least interesting and narratively satisfying storyline, but it isn't granted too many pages.

Surrender to the Will of the Night, beyond the ups and downs of plot and character, shares a few of the same reading frustrations I had with the first two books. One is the lack of a map. Much more than most books, this is a series where geography really plays a major role; characters are flying (not literally for most) all over the place and when they're not going to a setting they're referring to it (often by more than one name). A map here is less a luxury I'd say than an essential reading tool to get the fullness of the story. The same holds true for a glossary/reading cast; not only are there a slew of characters, but many of them are referenced via multiple names: nicknames, real names, titles, land names, assumed names. It can get difficult keeping track of which is which count/duke etc.

Stylistically, the novel could do with a lot better transitioning between scenes. The book seemed far too stripped of these making for very abrupt (distractingly so) shifts from scene to scene, place to place, character to character and an overall disjointed reading experience. And there's a bit too much of the reportage I mentioned, where the reader is told what is happening (or what happened off stage) rather than being shown it.

In the end, Surrender to the Will of the Night continues for both good and bad what the earlier two books had begun. It's a truly ambitious series that perhaps mirrors a little too much the complexity of the real world with its infinite events and choices and constant clamoring for attention to a million items, and then throws in an entire other world to boot. It's frustrating reading at times, dealing with so much underbrush as well as some rough transitioning, and while I think it's so far been rewarding enough, it's only just so, that ratio not quite where one would like it to be.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of Cook's better works 27 Nov 2010
By T Cadwell - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I found this to be the best of the Instrumentatlies of the Night series yet. Interesting scenarios, fun characters, surprising plot twists, and an engaging writing style serve to make it a great book.

My own criticisms would be that Cook ends up Jordanizing a bit here... He doesnt do a lot of refreshers on what happened in the previous book, and there are an awful lot of character threads, some of which are just not terribly interestingly, even though they are important to the story. I think this book would have been a lot better had he clipped out one of the side threads, and focused more on the core threads of Hecht/Tage and the 9th unknown.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rewards reading closely 28 Nov 2011
By John Middleton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is not the place to start reading Glen Cook, or even the Instrumentalities of the Night series: its book 3 of a planned 4 volume series which is densely plotted and involves a lot of jaw-breaking names. If you want to try Glen Cook, start with The Black Company or Garrett PI (depending how much humor you like). I think that this "Night" series is closest in spirit to the Black Company of all the other Cook stuff I have read, so if you liked that, you will probably like this.

This is the continuing story of Piper Hecht, commander of the armies of the Brothen, locked in a tussel with the Pramans over the Holy Land where the magical Wells of Ihrian are failing. However, Piper Hecht is in fact Else Tage, the Praman Sha-Lug janissary captain on a secret mission to the West. Except that's not his real name either, and his Western family have recovered him, and they all turn out to be sorcerors who have congress with the Night (ie various demons, devils, spirits, imps and gods). Confused yet? You will be. And that's the background of the last few books, not any of this one.

Like all the Night series, it's a struggle to get through the first 50 pages, but after that it all starts to make a little sense. While the focus is on Piper Hecht and his godslaying antics, it now widens to include his family, including his sister Heris, who may turn out to eclipse Piper in all of this. We also get to see the continuing diversions in the Connec, largely via Brother Candle, a Maysaylean Perfect who tends to have strange things happen around him, and also the disputed Holy Land, via an old friend of Piper's.

There are major quests, political disputes at 30 paces, changes of employment, requited but unfulfilled love and unwanted unrequited intercourse. This is all set in a world that looks suspicously like the medieval to renaissance Europe and mid-East, complete with religious and political differences, and the added complication of sorcery and old gods wishing to plunge the world into eternal winter. Then, to top it all off, the book ends on a huge cliffhanger. Characters here are well-written and realistic: they do stupid things whether they want to or not, make mistakes, and don't know what they don't know.

For all I loved it, I feel a little bad giving it 5 stars: there were a few too many digressions that occasionally disrupted the flow of the story I wanted to read. But everything Cook writes turns out relevant in the end, and I could not put the book down. So I am waiting for the fourth volume, Working the Gods Mischief sooner rather than later. You have to read this closely - there is a lot of information in dialogue - but its worth it. You can't skim read this stuff and enjoy it, so settle in and enjoy the ride.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Awesome Story and a Great Product 20 Feb 2012
By Shel Gatto - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Yet another excellent tale crafted by Glen Cook! I was thoroughly engaged with the Instrumentalities of the Night series when I added this title to my collection. Surrender to the Will of the Night furthers the story in the same deeply captivating manner. The only disappointing aspect was the ending, and not because it was lacking. Only because I have to wait for Working the Gods' Mischief to go into publication!

The product itself was in pristine condition. There was no damage and it arrived exactly as described and on time. I'm very glad I purchased this one and will most likely purchase the next from Amazon!
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