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Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ Paperback – 5 Mar 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press (5 Mar 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091926939
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091926939
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.8 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 87,379 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"Fascinating" (Alexis Petridis GQ)

"Essential reading for anyone interested in club culture" (Mixmag)

"Superb" (Observer Music Monthly)

"Highly entertaining" (Sunday Times)

"A supremely readable chronicle of pop culture self-destructing" (Word)

Review

Highly entertaining...with bizarre incidents and larger-than-life personalities

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. E. Norman on 13 Mar 2009
Format: Paperback
Only being 21 i missed the 90's dance scene by about 5 years but the 80's and 90's acid house scene has always intressed me, this book is a great insight into the madness,parties,and how the scene went from illegal raves to a global clubbbing brands.

If you where a clubber in the late 80's and through the 90's this book will be a great read, all the clubs all the DJ's get a shout. For clubbers that came into the scene in the 2000's like me some of the people and places will be a little bit lost on you but its still great to read about.

The book is heavyly based around the DJ "Sasha", i no he is a great dj and pretty much was the first dj to gain "superstar" status but it does get a little bit annoying after a while how often his name comes up. I think maybe the only way sasha would agree to an interview for the book is if he had a chapter about "himself"

The book also has a annoying habit of starting a story in say 1999 and then the next paragraph goes back to 1994 can get a little confusing.

this is a great book and deffo worth a read. 4/5
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Brown on 29 April 2009
Format: Paperback
For anybody who has been clubbing at any point over the last 20 yrs, this is a must read.

Dom Phillips unravels the crazy story's and urban myths that followed the phenomenon that was 'Superstar DJ's', thanks to his previous role as editor of the worlds most famous dance music magazine, Mixmag. He speaks candidly to all the big movers such as Sasha, Carl Cox, Norman Cook. As well as all the promoters of the superclubs such as Cream, Home, and Gatecrasher about the ridiculous money that was made and the drugs that were on tap.

This obviously makes very entertaining reading, but what the book also explores is the politic situation in the UK through the late 80's / early 90's and how the criminal justice act was adjusted to ban repetitive music!

Although I am quite knowledgeable of house / acid house music's roots I found the opening chapters of the book explained this very well, and put an interesting slant on things.

Finally, there is some excellent nuggets of well-known celebrity gossip throw in for good measure, which might explain why some BBC breakfast show presenters were so 'perky' in the mornings!

10 / 10 for me.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Decko on 28 Feb 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a slightly boring review of 1990's club culture. I went along with the read as I grew up in the nineties and am still a big fan of house music to this day and I will be for life! I don't understand the point of the book. I had respect for Dom Phillips as he wrote some good sleeve notes on global underground mixes and I believe he named the genre 'progressive house' - I loved progressive house and the global underground series. The problem I found was that at the end of the book he slates Sasha for no apparent reason and I felt a bit ill when I read it.This left me with 3 options... 1) resell the book on Amazon, 2) give the book to a charity shop, 3) squirt hp sauce over it and lob it in the bin! I chose option 3!! My advice is to have a look elsewhere as there must be a better club culture books knocking around. (And also Sasha is still an ace DJ/music producer).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Smyth on 14 Jun 2009
Format: Paperback
This book was going to have to be very good to deliver what it promised. And it did. Charts the rise of dance music and its DJs against backdrop of social and cultural changes of the 80s and 90s. Some great stories in there...and brought back a load of memories.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James O. Croft on 13 April 2009
Format: Paperback
This is an enjoyable book to read and helped fill many gaps in my history of key figures in UK club culture. Unfortunately tho it suffers from some pretty shabby writing and a somewhat negative view of it all...which is odd given the author made a living from talking up so many of the people involved. Dom Phillip's album sleeve to Paul Oakenfold's Global Underground 007 CD is stuff of legend, this book doesn't match it. Dance music and all that went with it changed the face of our society significantly for the better and it's something to be celebrated, not lamented.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sister T on 19 July 2012
Format: Paperback
I work with several great office DJ's who all rate their own skills highly. This book makes an excellent gift for the superstar office DJ in your life.

This is the site of my favourite office DJ, Russ. [...] He will love this book.
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Format: Paperback
I embraced the 90's dance music scene with gusto. Obviously I didn't realise at the time just how significant a decade the 90's would turn out to be. In 1993, I was a 16 year old boy, having left the strict discipline of a private boys schools for a lenient state college and, in turn, discovering and doing lots of things that would likely make my parents ill if they ever knew.

I couldn't always be bothered with the dressy aspect of the superclubs so I generally stuck to the more alternative techno/electronica club nights. The straightforward house music of the superclubs never particularly inspired me but I had another group of friends who frequented Wobble, Fun and Miss Moneypenny's in Birmingham so, on occasion, I would slip on the tartan trousers, the white shirt, the tank top and shiny shoes and join them.

As the 90's drew to a close, however, my interest in clubbing waned, along with all the things that went with it. A full time job, my now-wife and the diminishing quality of the merchandise meant I slowly but surely turned my back on clubbing, with me giving it up as an almost weekly activity in 1999. I've been raving since then, but never again did it consume my life like it had previously.

Reading this book has made realise I got out at just the right time. If I'd have been a year or two younger then I could have also been one of those poor sods who forked out £100 or more for a ticket on Millennium Eve, only to be massively let down. The Millennium signalled the end of an era for British clubbing. It was dance music's equivalent to Altamont and the Manson Murders, which some say signalled the end of the 60's, the hippy ideals, peace and free love.
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