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Superman: True Brit (Superman Limited Gns (DC Comics R)) Hardcover – 30 Oct 2004

2.5 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 30 Oct 2004
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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 96 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (30 Oct. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401200222
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401200220
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.3 x 26.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 509,362 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A rollicking adventure with an eccentric English take on the Superman myth." -- Western Daily Press, 11 December 2004 --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

About the Author

John Cleese is one of the original members of the Monty Python team, has written and appeared in numerous movies (including A Fish Called Wanda), and created and starred in Fawlty Towers (which can still be seen on TV today). Kim 'Howard' Johnson also wrote Life Before and After Monty Python. John Byrne's comics career spans over thirty years. He is responsible for classic runs on Uncanny X-Men, Fantastic Four and Superman, among many others. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I love John Cleese, he's a master comedian and his works with the Pythons, Fawlty Towers and A Fish called Wanda are true timeless masterpieces. One thing hard t miss, anyway, is his constant (as in EVERY thing he says or writes) derogatory statements about his own country. We (the English) are masters at self-deprecating humour, we just love to sarcastically emphasize our own deficiencies, but ultimately we know where to stop, before it becomes offensive. Cleese doesn't, and it's a fact: all his works are chock-full of harsh opinions towards the English while he emphatizes the greatness of all American things. I may sound like a biased and easily offended bloke, but just listen to some of his quotes in AFCW, or you can read this book. There's not a single decent English human being in the whole story: Clark is raised in a boring village, his parents are selfish and afraid of showing their son to the neighbors, the typical Brit college is full of awful people, London is basically only the paradigm of horrible journalism, Lois Lane is a harsh, evil girl while tadaa, America is just behind the corner and Clark decides to fly over there because it's so much a better place to live in.
John Cleese doesn't love England, and that's ok, a lot of celebrities are known for their harsh opinion towards their birthplaces, but I was hoping he would at least show a bit of love for anything, ANYTHING English among the endless mocking, offending and just plain insulting.
The book itself is not a bad read: much like Millar's Red Son, it retells Superman's origins as if he were born in a different country. Cleese ruined it all, at least for me, with his rambling. Perhaps a non-English reader will find this book very funny...as a Englishman who knows that every country has its ups and downs, I cannot be entertained by such offensive drivel
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Format: Paperback
Well I've just finished reading this and felt compelled to add my two cents. I am struggling at this moment to think of a more ineptly executed comic than this. I found it going cheap and thought what the hell, Knight and Squire was good (the British Batman and Robin if you were wondering). Where Knight and Squire was keenly observed, frequently hilarious and even a little moving at times, this is a mess and just plain insulting.

I am not patriotic in any way but even I felt that it was just mean spirited. As a nation we've always had a self depricating sense of humour but this is something else. If you're going to write a satire of British culture you have to do a bit better than lame puns about tea and cricket. Of which there are plenty here. This was published in 2004 but it's references and sterotypes are about forty years out of date. It has "ordinary British people" shovelling coal into their boilers for christ's sake. At one point the coal miners are put out of work (I won't say why because of spoilers). "Ah", you might say, "surely a sharp satire on the legacy of Thatcherism!". You would be giving the writers entirely too much credit. It's merely the unfunny punchline to a poor slapstick level joke, delivered with all the skill of a five year old attempting brain surgery. In addition to this every British person in the book is utterly vile and duplicitous. The only nice people being Colin Clark (Superman) and Lois Lane, who pops over from America. Britain is portrayed as a nasty, grimey, backwards, isolated little island populated by buck toothed, self regarding cretins.

The book tries to ape the style of the Beano/Dandy and that's not a bad idea. However the jokes are so lacking in wit that they may as well have just populated the book with fart jokes.
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Format: Paperback
There's not much to be said about this, except don't bother. I loved RedSon, which imagines Superman if he'd arrived in the USSR, so I thought that this could be as clever as that. Unfortunately, it's not funny, clever, interesting, engaging or exciting. It's a like a Beano parody of a superhero comic. I keep all my books, but I gave this away. Buy RedSon instead.
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Format: Paperback
Much like the story Red Son where instead of kansas superman crashes in the USSR,here he crashes on a farm outside weston super mare.
Unfortunately its played entirely for laughs,and is not funny at all.
Superman's parents bizarrely keep moving house on him?
The characters are nasty ,petty ,small minded ,grubby little creatures
and our hero's main enemy appears to be the gutter press.
Words fail me when I try to convey just how stupid ,shallow and weird this nasty little comic is
and they even managed to rope in john cleese ,(Must need the money for all that alimony)
he continues his streak of not having done anything of note for 30 years.
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Format: Paperback
Origin stories, particularly alternate origin stories are popular fare. The Superman story Red Son sees him grow up in Russia. True Brit has him fall to earth in Britain and raised as Colin Kent. But this is not the Britain any of its natives would recognise but the cosy, quaint, repressed Britain that comes from the American mind. John Cleese is credited as one of the creators and you can see the slapstick of Python and Fawlty Towers in there.

There isn't much of a story here and there fun comes from spotting how the American characters translate into a farcical British setting. Disturbingly the whole work seems to be a thinly veiled attack on the newspaper industry. Very thinly veiled at times. It seems like someone had an axe to grind and wasn't clever about doing it.

The art is perfectly serviceable and harks back to the style of popular British comics such as the Beano and Whizzer & Chips but with infinitely more colour. It is a nice idea and interesting to see how the familiar is relocated with some appalling puns thrown in. It is a Thumbs Up but barely.
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