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Submarine Bells


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Product details

  • Audio CD (13 Mar. 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner -- a.D.a. --
  • ASIN: B000005JAZ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 433,336 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Heavenly Pop Hit 3:28£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Tied Up In Chain 3:15£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. The Oncoming Day 3:06£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Part Past Part Fiction 2:56£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Singing In My Sleep 2:40£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. I Soar 3:05£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Dead Web 2:16£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Familarity Breeds Contempt 3:21£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Don'T Be- Memory 4:46£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Effloresce And Deliquesce 2:45£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Sweet Times0:42£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Submarine Bells 3:41£0.79  Buy MP3 

Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

The Chills' signing with Slash/Warner Bros. led them to producer Gary Smith, who helped make the New Zealand indie-popsters' most polished record yet. As it turns out, Submarine Bells is also their masterpiece, a genuinely gorgeous meld of nearly orchestral keyboard washes and melodies that refuse to leave your head (or, for long stretches, your CD player). "Sitting alone at night in my dark bedroom, trying to explain myself in a song to you," Martin Phillipps is more obsessive - about pop music, unhappy love affairs, death - than ever. On Submarine Bells, he passes a version of salvation on to you. --Rickey Wright

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By russell clarke TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 Jan. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Everyone equates pop music with Madonna, Girls Aloud and Robbie chuffing Williams., blissfully unaware that albums as glorious Submarine Bells exist, for make no mistake this is pop music. Not only that it’s pop music of the highest order. Pop music as it should always be and so rarely is- incandescent, optimistic yet at times moving and vulnerable, and so tuneful it would make a gargoyle whistle.
Originally released in March 1990 Chills songwriter/singer Martin Phillips was overseeing the groups 15th incarnation or something( When they recorded their next album the patchily superb “Soft Bomb” there was only him left from the line up that recorded this album) despite the fact this was only their second album in 10 years. New Zealand where this band hails from must have provided plenty of distractions even in those pre “Lord of the Rings “days. Not to worry. This album was well worth the wait.
Opening track “Heavenly Pop Hit” is a wonderful statement of atavistic intent and by default the most apt description of its magnificent charms. It soars on wings of alabaster then swoops down on top of the colossal keyboard melody, Phillips elegant vocals straining at the epiphany of the sublime chorus. “Singing in My Sleep” has more of the bands churning keyboard and a refrain so hummable it will percolate round your head for weeks after. The glorious songs just keep on coming. “Oncoming Day” is a nerve frazzled rush of joy and wizard like charm. “Part past Part Friction” twists and leaps like a trout in a tumble dryer while “I Soar”….well, let’s just say it soars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. T. P. Kingston on 26 Nov. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
cause this ain't it... sorry.
There are some stunning moments - Heavenly Pop Hit & Oncoming Day - but more than a few others which don't seem vintage Chills. Unfortunate 'cause The Chills were a wonderful band - and its getting hard to hunt their stuff out.
Not as good an album as the brilliant (woefully produced) Brave Words - this is still a cd worth cherishing.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Superb LP by a very under rated band, New Zeland's finest!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 22 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
How do you live? 13 Jan. 2000
By Eoin O Suilleabhain - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It is nearly two years since I bought this, and it is the only album I still must hear at least once a week. There is not once a faltering of quality, from the glorious sunburst that is the opening organ on "Heavenly Pop Hit" to the sublime fading chimes of the title track. It invigorates and captivates the soul, until one feels one is bleeding raw emotion and crying pure tears of 'joie de vivre'. The poetry and honesty of Martin Phillip's lyrics is unequalled. If everyone in the world listened to this, there'd be no more war or sadness, and we'd live for the dawning of the day.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Heavenly pop hits 19 April 2004
By EA Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The first track of "Submarine Bells" is definitely well named, and not just for the first song either -- the whole album is made of "heavenly pop hits." This New Zealand band produced some pretty charming pop-rock that melds near-orchestral music with catchy pop melodies and melancholy writing.
A majestive sweep of organ-like keyboard opens "Heavenly Pop Hit" and the harder, contemplative "Tied Up In Chain." Dali-esque love songs ("Oncoming Day") blossom into the strange and surreal ("I Soar") the slowly catchy ("Dead Web" and "Don't Be -- Memory") the searing whirlwind rock ("Familiarity Breeds Contempt") and ends by coming full circle to where it started -- catchy, chiming pop (the charming "Effloresce And Deliquesce" and delicate sea ode "Submarine Bells").
The Chills don't possess the musical brilliance of true geniuses, but their catchy, enticing alternative-pop songs are unforgettable. They swirl, they snap, they shimmer, they sparkle with irresistable melodies. The first two songs suck you in with their hooks and chiming keyboard pop, before shifting into the darker, stranger realms of songs like the eerie "I Soar" and the louder, rockier "Oncoming Day." By that time, you're already caught up in the music and won't want to turn it off.
Martin Phillips, without being whiny, uses these simple-seeming songs to bemoan death, love, and any combination of the above. (The love of death? The death of love? Both work...) Despite the cheery tone of the music, the songs themselves are hauntingly written: "I have to talk to someone/describe it all to someone/emotions are imploding/but there's nothing to say... they've all gone away..."
New Zealand has proved in the past few years that it can serve up top-notch stuff that the public devours with a passion. But the Chills' "Submarine Bells" shows that this is hardly a new development. Beautiful, haunting and quite enjoyable.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
my favorite album of 2003, regardless of when it came out 3 Aug. 2004
By Davy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
the first of five chills albums i bought last summer, and easily the best. this is their masterpiece, and i've never in my life heard a better, more solid, more surprising synth-pop record. in fact, in light of this album, the rest of the chills' stuff is good, but not nearly good enough, if this is what they were capable of. every song crawls inside your head and camps out there, so by the time you're done listening, you've got 40 minutes of new-age kiwi pop bouncing around your skull. sadly, i don't listen to it much nowadays, but it speaks to the immediate and engaging accessibility of this record that it's the first one in maybe 6 years i've listened to frequently, repeatedly, to the point of complete saturation.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Heavenly, indeed 14 April 2003
By happydogpotatohead - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This album is a masterpiece because it contains beautifully written, played, and produced pop music. The lyrics are heartfelt and yet knowing, and the music is a swirl of shining beauty. Comparing this band to Coldplay is frankly insulting; Coldplay only wishes they could write a song as absolutely wonderful as "Heavenly Pop Hit."
If the Chills were a "second tier act," that was no fault of theirs; when this record was originally released, their United States record company had no idea what to do with them and gave them no promotion. I was lucky enough to see them live on a brief tour of the U.S., and Martin Phillips and co. were every bit as good live as they were on this record. The Chills should have been one of New Zealand's most famous imports; album after album of great stuff, and this one is possibly their best.
The reviewer from Switzerland has snow in his ears. This is one of the great lost rock albums. Miss it, and it's your loss.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Heavenly pop hits 2 Mar. 2004
By EA Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The first track of "Submarine Bells" is definitely well named, and not just for the first song either -- the whole album is made of "heavenly pop hits." This New Zealand band produced some pretty darn charming pop-rock that melds near-orchestral music with catchy pop melodies and melancholy writing.
A majestive sweep of organ-like keyboard opens "Heavenly Pop Hit" and the harder, contemplative "Tied Up In Chain." Dali-esque love songs ("Oncoming Day") blossom into the strange and surreal ("I Soar") the slowly catchy ("Dead Web" and "Don't Be -- Memory") the searing whirlwind rock ("Familiarity Breeds Contempt") and ends by coming full circle to where it started -- catchy, chiming pop (the charming "Effloresce And Deliquesce" and delicate sea ode "Submarine Bells").
The Chills don't possess the musical brilliance of true geniuses, but their catchy, enticing alternative-pop songs are unforgettable. They swirl, they snap, they shimmer, they sparkle with irresistable melodies. The first two songs suck you in with their hooks and chiming keyboard pop, before shifting into the darker, stranger realms of songs like the eerie "I Soar" and the louder, rockier "Oncoming Day." By that time, you're already caught up in the music and won't want to turn it off.
Martin Phillips, without being whiny, uses these simple-seeming songs to bemoan death, love, and any combination of the above. (The love of death? The death of love? Both work...) Despite the cheery tone of the music, the songs themselves are hauntingly written: "I have to talk to someone/describe it all to someone/emotions are imploding/but there's nothing to say... they've all gone away..."
New Zealand has proved in the past few years that it can serve up top-notch stuff that the public devours with a passion. But the Chills' "Submarine Bells" shows that this is hardly a new development. Beautiful, haunting and quite enjoyable.
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