Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Study in Terror (Camden) Hardcover – Large Print, 1 Nov 2001


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Large Print
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£4.00
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Chivers Large print (Chivers, Windsor, Paragon & C; Large type edition edition (1 Nov. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0754045854
  • ISBN-13: 978-0754045854
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,473,271 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Synopsis

Sherlock Holmes is matched against Jack the Ripper in a story told by Dr. Watson. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Strange Encounter 16 Feb. 2002
By "larsson29" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In the year 1888, a surgeon's kit mysteriously arrive at Baker Street residence of Sherlock Holmes. Training his marvelous powers on it,Holmes set forth on one of his most fascinating adventures.
Three-quarters of a century later, an equally mystifying package is deliverd to Ellery Queen. It contains a manuscript purporting to be an unpublished Sherlock Holmes novel written byJohn Watson, M.D.-an exceptional tale revealing the long-revealed secret of how Holmes uncovered the identityof Jack The Ripper!
Tracing the origin of the manuscript, Ellerydiscovers a startling connection betweenthe past and the present. Irresistibly intrigued, he journeys back into time to join Holmes in pursuit of the Ripper.
Following the master step-by-thrilling step, Ellery's remarkable powers of deduction lead him to a stunning and ironic solution of his own!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
TWO PUZZLES FOR THE PRICE OF ONE 30 May 2012
By David R. Eastwood - Published on Amazon.com
A STUDY IN TERROR (1966) involves Ellery Queen, an author-detective, with two puzzles, one IN a notebook that has been sent to him, the other ABOUT that notebook. The notebook he receives was supposedly written by Dr. Watson and deals with Sherlock Holmes's attempts to capture Jack the Ripper. Is the notebook authentic? And if so, are there any hidden truths lying within it that Watson never saw? Furthermore, WHO sent it to Ellery Queen and WHY did that person do so?

Intelligent readers who are used to Fair Play Puzzle Stories will find their wits tested quite well with this book. Others readers can enjoy it just for the "story," which operates on two main levels and several minor ones, including sometimes even playing with aspects of "Self-Reflecting Metafictions" as Ellery struggles to meet his own mystery-writing deadline set by his publisher.

The pieces of the double puzzle are cleverly fitted together - but at some costs. On several occasions LUCK is the sole factor involved, such as when Watson and Holmes (in the notebook's story) survive being captured by a vicious killer.

Indeed, the very existence of the notebook and its ownership by Somebody-Who-Cannot-Be-Named-Here rest totally on VERY dubious motivation which readers are expected to swallow - or ignore. To say anything further would be providing "spoilers" to future readers.

Weighing this book's strengths and weaknesses, in my judgment it deserves a solid "B" grade.

POSTSCRIPT: Although this entire book has been published under the by-line "Ellery Queen," the chapters containing the Notebook of Dr. Watson were actually written by Paul W. Fairman (based on the 1965 FILM titled A STUDY IN TERROR - screenplay by Harry Craig), and the chapters involving Ellery Queen were written by Manfred B. Lee and Frederic Dannay, the team of cousins who usually wrote under the pen name "Ellery Queen."
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Interesting, but flawed 20 May 2005
By Solar Pons - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
An interesting yet flawed account of Holmes tracking Jack The Ripper, with Ellery Queen added to the mix. Not a terrible pastiche, mind you, but it pales when compared to the wonderful non-Ellery Queen film version that stars John Neville as Holmes. So check out the film first, if you can track it down. And then, if you're so inclined, try the book.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A pastiche within a story and a secondary puzzle besides! 27 Mar. 2013
By AcerAcer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a really interesting book. It's an amalgam of the Sherlock Holmes movie "A Study in Terror" and a modern day (1960's) story which is typical Ellery Queen: Ellery is trying to finish a book before the publisher's deadline, and life keeps interfering.

Ellery is working on his latest mystery novel and he's having writer's block. A casual friend shows up with an envelope for him. The friend had been at a party and someone had slipped this envelope onto the front seat of his car. The envelope was addressed to Ellery Queen, so the friend brought it to him. The friend doesn't have any idea who gave him the envelope.

When Ellery opens the envelope, he finds a manuscript purported to be written by Dr. John H. Watson! It is the story of Sherlock Holmes trying to catch Jack the Ripper. Ellery suddenly finds he is not much interested in the novel he's working on anymore. He compulsively reads the manuscript from beginning to end -- and from his chair he deduces not only who sent him the manuscript and why, but also that the story that Watson tells is not accurate. That is to say, it's totally accurate as to what Watson saw and heard, but not at all accurate as to the conclusions he came to. Holmes was purposely misleading him besides, so Watson thinks the killer is one person but it's really another. Ellery figures it all out and goes to tell the person who sent him the manuscript who the Ripper really was. (And by the way, if you've already seen the movie, the book switched things around a bit, including the identity of the killer.)

So it's clever; a story within a story, and it gave the guys who wrote Ellery Queen a chance try their hands at a pastiche! Holmes and Watson are pretty true to character and the only thing I don't believe is that Holmes would mislead Watson at the very end. I can see him not telling Watson much while they are chasing Jack the Ripper, but once it's all over, I don't understand why Holmes would "lie" to Watson, if only by omission. Watson was privy to everything that Holmes was...I mean, Holmes was always saying, "Anything you can tell me, you can tell Watson." So why wouldn't he let Watson know the truth? That's the only thing I found to be out of character as far as the pastiche goes.

Of course, the story is written as if Holmes and Watson were real people. At the end, Ellery is talking to a very old woman who had actually met them when she was a child. He tells her he's quite jealous that she actually met them. She shares her memories of them with Ellery, and danged if I wasn't jealous, too!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TWO PUZZLES FOR THE PRICE OF ONE 29 May 2012
By David R. Eastwood - Published on Amazon.com
A STUDY IN TERROR (1966) involves Ellery Queen, an author-detective, with two puzzles, one IN a notebook that has been sent to him, the other ABOUT that notebook. The notebook he receives was supposedly written by Dr. Watson and deals with Sherlock Holmes's attempts to capture Jack the Ripper. Is the notebook authentic? And if so, are there any hidden truths lying within it that Watson never saw? Furthermore, WHO sent it to Ellery Queen and WHY did that person do so?

Intelligent readers who are used to Fair Play Puzzle Stories will find their wits tested quite well with this book. Others readers can enjoy it just for the "story," which operates on two main levels and several minor ones, including sometimes even playing with aspects of "Self-Reflecting Metafictions" as Ellery struggles to meet his own mystery-writing deadline set by his publisher.

The pieces of the double puzzle are cleverly fitted together - but at some costs. On several occasions LUCK is the sole factor involved, such as when Watson and Holmes (in the notebook's story) survive being captured by a vicious killer.

Indeed, the very existence of the notebook and its ownership by Somebody-Who-Cannot-Be-Named-Here rest totally on VERY dubious motivation which readers are expected to swallow - or ignore. To say anything further would be providing "spoilers" to future readers.

Weighing this book's strengths and weaknesses, in my judgment it deserves a solid "B" grade.

POSTSCRIPT: Although this entire book has been published under the by-line "Ellery Queen," the chapters containing the Notebook of Dr. Watson were actually written by Paul W. Fairman (based on the 1965 FILM titled A STUDY IN TERROR - screenplay by Harry Craig), and the chapters involving Ellery Queen were written by Manfred B. Lee and Frederic Dannay, the team of cousins who usually wrote under the pen name "Ellery Queen."
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback