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  • Le Quai Des Brumes (StudioCanal Collection) *Digitally Restored  [1938] [Blu-ray]
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Le Quai Des Brumes (StudioCanal Collection) *Digitally Restored [1938] [Blu-ray]

10 customer reviews

Price: £13.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Le Quai Des Brumes (StudioCanal Collection) *Digitally Restored  [1938] [Blu-ray] + Le Jour Se Leve - 75th Anniversary Edition  [1939] [Blu-ray]
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Product details

  • Actors: Jean Gabin, Michel Simon, Michèle Morgan
  • Directors: Marcel Carné
  • Format: Import, Blu-ray, Subtitled
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English, French, German
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Studiocanal
  • DVD Release Date: 10 Sept. 2012
  • Run Time: 88 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B007HZH1OY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 54,649 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Le Quai Des Brumes is Marcel Carné’s controversial adaptation of the Pierre Mac Orlan novel of the same name, today regarded as one of the greatest French classical movies. Jean (Jean Gabin), a deserter, arrives in Le Havre and looks for a shelter before leaving the French territory. Housed in a shed on the harbour, at the end of the docks, he meets an eccentric painter (Michel Simon) and a mysterious and beautiful girl called Nelly (Michèle Morgan). From then on he will be trapped in a tragic destiny, in spite of his passion for Nelly and his will to live…

Bonus Content

-On The Port Of Shadows
-Introduction to Le Quai Des Brumes by Ginette Vincendeau, Professor and Film Critic
-Restoring Le Quai Des Brumes
-Booklet on the movie written by Ginette Vincendeau professor and film critic.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Tim Kidner TOP 500 REVIEWER on 6 July 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Director Marcel Carne, here in just pre-war 1938, made many notable films but for many World Cinema devotees, he is an unknown, or in my case, a newcomer. His Les Enfants de Paradis (1946) is one of the most enchanting and beautiful of all French films, from any period and remains one of my all-time favourites.

However, I find his feature films with Jean Gabin a rather jagged little pill. In both his later Le Jour Se Leve and here, Gabin plays rather unlikeable lead roles and I find him difficult to warm to. Though in this case, assisted by screenwriter Jacques Prévert, as army deserter "Jean", he certainly is a complex fellow, whose psyche snaps back and fore as his bewildered despondency on life puts up barriers and communication to others.

There's a visual semblance in Gabin of a cross between Spencer Tracey and James Cagney (to my eyes) and also almost in their usual characters - the caring, humane Tracey and the snarling Cagney. Michelle Morgan plays the dark and beautiful Nelly and the two floating into love seems as fleeting and ephemeral as the shifting mists of the title - translated as 'Port Of Shadows'.

That Port is Le Havre and the evocative cinematography is the film's finest feature, a real mood-piece that eschews a clammy emptiness. The tonal range of Eugen Schüfftan's black & white camerawork is superb and is fully realised by this digital restoration, without blemish or flaw.

The dog that tags on is a nice touch and suits Gabin's character - restless, looking for both company and opportunity but I'm afraid I couldn't settle with the false-bearded Michel Simon, with that hair-piece visibly having gaps in it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 18 Nov. 2012
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
"Life is a curious thing. At least what you see of it between midnight and three AM."

A success in 1938 but decried in 1940 as `immoral, depressing and distressing for young people, Le Quai des Brumes has been censored and cut so many times over the years that the original negative is incomplete and some footage is still missing even on StudioCanal's recent and sadly unsatisfying restoration of the film. Marcel Carne's downbeat drama is still one of the high water marks of the strain of doomed romanticism that was so influential in pre-war French cinema, providing Jean Gabin with another of his luckless disillusioned romantics who finds love and his own destruction at the same time, in this case as a deserter who falls for Michele Morgan's abused shop assistant and crosses some gangsters who are looking for incriminating documents held by her former lover who may have been murdered by her creepy guardian Michel Simon. For once Gabin is overshadowed by his supporting players, with Morgan the kind of luminous presence who can even make a plastic mac look good and Simon's overtly pious and loquacious but quietly seedy bearded and rabbit-toothed hypocrite rank with decayed morality creating the most memorable characters in the veritable rogues gallery Carne and screenwriter Jacques Prevert conjure up. The film simply oozes atmosphere even in the compromised versions that have been seen over the years - just as well, because StudioCanal's release of the Cinematheque Francaise's restoration of the film is quite a disappointment.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Mr. P. W. Martin on 1 Jan. 2008
Format: DVD
a fantastic, moody drama. a french soldier awol goes to a port to take a ship to escape his life. he runs into a local gangster, a girl and her guardian. terrific acting and superbly gloomy photography. you can smell the sea as well as the mood
a true classic
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By ArtsEater on 10 May 2012
Format: DVD
In Marcel Carné's visually stunning black & white film we follow Jean, a deserter who arrives at night in the northern French port town of Le Havre, looking to leave French shores for good. Jean is your classic outsider. He gets lucky whilst waiting around for a ship to take him to Venezuela: he gets civilian clothes, a little bit of money, a passport, a dog, and he also falls in love with Nelly (played by the stunningly beautiful Michéle Morgan) - a 17-year-old desperate to escape the clutches of her lecherous godfather, Zabel. In your typical film noir, Nelly would be the femme fatale - but Carné makes her too innocent to be one. Although she is the object of lust of various men including her (missing) boyfriend Maurice, her protector Zabel, and the local wannabe-gangster, Lucien, she exudes an innocence not found in your classic maneater.

Understandably, Jean falls deeply for Nelly. Their gradual domestication is symbolised by the their walking around together along the streets of Le Havre. Nelly stops to buy their (stray) dog a collar and lead. But is this domestic bliss between the lovers doomed? Does Jean anticipate a sad end for the couple by saying that the dog doesn't like the collar - it prefers to be free? Jean's ship is leaving for Venezuela in a matter of hours, but he's in love with Nelly. Will he leave her behind? Or is visiting the port-side dive bar, Panama's, the closest he'll get to Central/Sth America?

So much for the plot, but there is so much else in this beautifully harsh film. On the surface 'Le Quai des brumes' is your classic film noir: the outsider on the run; the gangsters; the femme fatale etc. But Carné plays with these tropes and adds another layer. There are discussions on art, war, and death to name but a few.
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