Studies in Hysteria and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£10.39
  • RRP: £12.99
  • You Save: £2.60 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £2.06
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Studies in Hysteria (Penguin Modern Classics) Paperback – 25 Mar 2004


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£219.99
Paperback, 25 Mar 2004
£10.39
£5.23 £5.04
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

Studies in Hysteria (Penguin Modern Classics) + The Psychology of Love (Penguin Modern Classics) + The Interpretation of Dreams (Classics of World Literature)
Price For All Three: £24.77

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £2.06
Trade in Studies in Hysteria (Penguin Modern Classics) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.06, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; New Ed edition (25 Mar 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141184825
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141184821
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.1 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 97,350 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sigmund Freud was born in 1856 in Moravia; between the ages of four and eighty-two his home was in Vienna: in 1938 Hitler's invasion of Austria forced him to seek asylum in London, where he died in the following year.

His career began with several years of brilliant work on the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. He was almost thirty when, after a period of study under Charcot in Paris, his interests first turned to psychology, and another ten years of clinical work in Vienna (at first in collaboration with Breuer, an older colleague) saw the birth of his creation, psychoanalysis. This began simply as a method of treating neurotic patients by investigating their minds, but it quickly grew into an accumulation of knowledge about the workings of the mind in general, whether sick or healthy. Freud was thus able to demonstrate the normal development of the sexual instinct in childhood and, largely on the basis of an examination of dreams, arrived at his fundamental discovery of the unconscious forces that influence our everyday thoughts and actions.

Freud's life was uneventful, but his ideas have shaped not only many specialist disciplines, but the whole intellectual climate of the last half-century.


Product Description

About the Author

Sigmund Freud was born in 1856 and died in exile in London in 1939. As a writer and doctor he remains one of the informing voices of the twentieth century.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Prompted by a chance observation, we have for a number of years been searching among the most diverse forms and symptoms of hysteria for their precipitating cause - the event which, often many years earlier, first gave rise to the phenomenon in question. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 July 2004
Format: Paperback
This new translation, by Nicola Luckhurst, of Freud's Studien über Hysterie is a remarkable achievement, surpassing James Strachey's classic translation.
What makes it better? It stays very close to the text - obviously. Paradoxically, this means that the text is rougher, and more open. Luckhurst's translation preserves Freud's physical metaphors, the peculiarity of style and with this the feel that Freud is developing a new language for his new science, psychoanalysis. In this translation, Freud is not the dour, august professor but the young explorer discovering sexuality and desire.
Luckhurst has an exquisitely sensitive ear for Freud's language. For example, she picks up a number of metaphors related to pregnancy, labor, and childbirth that had disappeared in Strachey's translation: "These metaphors, often neutralized in earlier translations, seem important in that they indicate an unconscious feminine identification - by which I mean Freud's empathy (or counter-transference) for his patients as women and as mothers. Recovering these metaphors may allow hysteria to signify differently, as we hear Freud's patients dis-identify with their maternal or pregnant self, and project it into the psychoanalyst."
For anyone interested Freud and psychoanalysis, the Translator's Preface is worth the price of the book.
In sum: this new translation of one of the founding texts of psychoanalysis is a great read - and it will change the way we read Freud.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eugene Murray on 30 Dec 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Unable to complete due to computer up grade I lost the book & could not retrieve it, hard going to start with
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Brilliant Translation 26 July 2004
By A Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This new translation, by Nicola Luckhurst, of Freud's Studien über Hysterie is a remarkable achievement, surpassing James Strachey's classic translation.

What makes it better? It stays very close to the text - obviously. Paradoxically, this means that the text is rougher, and more open. Luckhurst's translation preserves Freud's physical metaphors, the peculiarity of style and with this the feel that Freud is developing a new language for his new science, psychoanalysis. In this translation, Freud is not the dour, august professor but the young explorer discovering sexuality and desire.

Luckhurst has an exquisitely sensitive ear for Freud's language. For example, she picks up a number of metaphors related to pregnancy, labor, and childbirth that had disappeared in Strachey's translation: "These metaphors, often neutralized in earlier translations, seem important in that they indicate an unconscious feminine identification - by which I mean Freud's empathy (or counter-transference) for his patients as women and as mothers. Recovering these metaphors may allow hysteria to signify differently, as we hear Freud's patients dis-identify with their maternal or pregnant self, and project it into the psychoanalyst."

For anyone interested Freud and psychoanalysis, the Translator's Preface is worth the price of the book.

In sum: this new translation of one of the founding texts of psychoanalysis is a great read - and it will change the way we read Freud.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
The hidden drives beneath hysteria 27 Jan 2001
By Maurizio Pompili - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A fascinating book that explores the hidden factors behind anxiety, written when Freud was still studying his first hysterical patients that became famous in the psychoanalytic literature. The collaboration with Breur was actually sealed with this book, but ironically it was also the end of their friendship. Apart from the psychoanalytic concepts, the reader can really enjoy the five case studies included in "Study on hysteria". Only one case study was written by Breur and this goes to show that Freud really wanted to go deep into the unconscious whereas Breur after the first patient didn't go any further; basically because he would have had to confront himself with the patient's sexual drives as well as his instincts. This is a very stimulating book that allows the reader to appreciate the kind of female patients affected by hysteria before the 20th century, that were not understood by most psychiatrists. Freud menaged to understand why the repression of the sexual instinct led to a neurosis.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Should be required reading in public schools 29 Jan 2008
By random reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm not disputing the first reviewer who gave the book one star because it is a poor translation. Strachey's translation is good enough, though, to make the book readable, and it should be read by everyone. Freud's clarity of thought and insight and pure intelligence is well represented in this book, and it serves as a decent introduction to elementary psychoanalysis.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A Classic of writing in Science 30 April 2012
By B. Marold - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This may be one of the very few works of scientific research which is more than 100 years old, and is still being read by the non-professional. Since the work is so well known, and since another reviewer has commented on the translation, a matter on which I am not qualified, I will limit myself to the virtues of the Kindle edition.

Often, Kindle editions of older works are dumb as bricks. But this edition has at least three facets which are essential for a scholarly book, in addition to the usual ability of Kindle to search texts. First, it has a complete, active table of contents, including references to the Bibliography, Notes, and printed index. Second, it has active "drill down" notes. This may be the second most valuable asset of e-books, after searching. Footnotes are bad enough, when there are many, because they are often hard to read. End notes are a disaster if you really need them (as when you are writing a paper.) The third is the combination of printed index and the fact that the Kindle gives the page number of the printed edition. Searching may be quicker, but the original index will give you the places where a topic discussion is important, as when it spans several pages.

I did notice one glitch, which was unworthy of an edition at this price. The Active table of contents reference to a list of appreviations pointed to the space between the previous and the following entry. Somehow, that list was left out. I got this book when I was doing a paper on the Salem Witch Trials, and it was eminantly helpful. There are few references more impressive than when you cite "really important" sources from the likes of Freud, Darwin, Einstein, Newton, and Faraday rather than to some secondary reference about these people and their work.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
THE FOUNDATIONAL WORK OF LATER FREUDIAN PSYCHOLOGY 14 Aug 2010
By Steven H Propp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Josef Breuer (1842-1925) was an Austrian physician whose works laid the foundation of psychoanalysis. This collaborative effort was Freud's first book. Here are some representative quotations from the book:

"(E)ach individual hysterical symptom immediately and permanently disappeared when we had succeeded in bringing clearly to light the memory of the event by which it was provoked and in arousing its accompanying affect, and when the patient had described that event in the greatest possible detail and had put the affect into words."
"(One patient) aptly described this procedure, speaking seriously, as a 'talking cure,' while she referred to it jokingly as 'chimney-sweeping.'"
"As regards the symptoms disappearing after being 'talked away,' I cannot use this as evidence; it may very well be explained by suggestion."
"This procedure was one of clearing away the pathogenic psychical material layer by layer, and we liked to compare it with the technique of excavating a buried city."
"Originality is claimed for very little of what will be found in the following pages."
"We describe as conscious those ideas which we observe as active in us, or which we should observe if we attended to them... and if others, apart from those, should be current at the time, we should have to call them unconscious ideas."
"(T)he great majority of severe neuroses in women have their origin in the marriage bed."
"(B)y means of my psychical work I had to overcome a psychical force in the patients which was opposed to the pathogenic ideas becoming conscious (being remembered)."
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback