Stringbags in Action and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Stringbags in Action on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Stringbags in Action [Illustrated] [Hardcover]

B.B. Schofield
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 19.99
Price: 18.65 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 1.34 (7%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 2 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 9.26  
Hardcover, Illustrated 18.65  

Book Description

18 Nov 2010
Admiral Schofield s accounts of the Taranto and Bismarck battles make for unforgettable reading. The author traces the development of British naval aviation from its early beginnings in 1912, through the First World War and the frustrations of the inter-war years. The November 1940 attack on the Italian fleet in its strongly defended base at Taranto demonstrated for the first time the battle-winning capability of carrier-borne aircraft from HMS Illustrious. The lesson was quickly learnt by the Japanese who just over a year later inflicted such devastating losses on the American Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbour. In the second part the Author recounts the legendary action that culminated in the sinking of the Bismarck. While this action involved large numbers of Royal Navy ships, not least the battle cruiser Hood sunk with terrible loss of life, the Rodney, Prince of Wales and numerous cruisers, aircraft from Ark Royal and Victorious played a pivotal role. No two naval actions better demonstrate the early use of air power.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Pen & Sword Maritime; First Edition edition (18 Nov 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848843887
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848843882
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 24.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,197,508 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Vice Admiral BB Schofield had a distinguished naval career serving in both World Wars. He was closely involved in the planning of naval operations for D-Day and his insider view is told in Operation NEPTUNE (republished by Pen and Sword Maritime in 2008). He died in 1984. His daughter Victoria Schofield, the leading biographer and author, lives in West London.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It may have been obsolete, but what an aircraft! 12 Jun 2013
By Ned Middleton HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
At the outbreak of WW2 in 1939, only four countries operated aircraft carriers. These were Britain, USA, Japan and France - although the single French carrier Béarn remained interned in Martinique until 1945 when she was used briefly as a transporter and never launched an aircraft in action. Germany did launch the first of two intended aircraft carriers (Graf Zeppelin) in 1938 but that ship was never completed and was eventually scuttled by retreating German forces. Only Britain, USA and Japan, therefore, operated effective carrier forces during that war. Of these, both the USA and Japan employed a far more effective aircraft with single wings whereas the Royal Navy remained loyal to a particular type of biplane called the Swordfish which was commonly known as a `string bag' on account of the construction material and the fact that the double wings were supported by wires.

Nevertheless, in an age where the, then, modern battleship was king, it was this aircraft which attacked the Italian fleet in Taranto harbour in November 1940 destroying one battleship and damaging two more in return for very light casualties. This was the first ever aircraft attack on ships in history where the aircraft were launched at sea. In spite of using obsolete aircraft (Hurricanes and Spitfires were already in service with the RAF), the damage they were able to inflict on the Italian Navy is now accepted as being the first indication of the coming supremacy of naval aviation. In 1941, these same aircraft attacked and disabled the Bismarck - one of the finest and most modern battleships afloat, and, in so doing, brought that mighty ship to the mercy of the chasing British fleet.

In this work, author, historian and former Vice-Admiral B. B.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It may have been obsolete, but what an aircraft! 12 Jun 2013
By Ned Middleton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
At the outbreak of WW2 in 1939, only four countries operated aircraft carriers. These were Britain, USA, Japan and France - although the single French carrier Béarn remained interned in Martinique until 1945 when she was used briefly as a transporter and never launched an aircraft in action. Germany did launch the first of two intended aircraft carriers (Graf Zeppelin) in 1938 but that ship was never completed and was eventually scuttled by retreating German forces. Only Britain, USA and Japan, therefore, operated effective carrier forces during that war. Of these, both the USA and Japan employed a far more effective aircraft with single wings whereas the Royal Navy remained loyal to a particular type of biplane called the Swordfish which was commonly known as a `string bag' on account of the construction material and the fact that the double wings were supported by wires.

Nevertheless, in an age where the, then, modern battleship was king, it was this aircraft which attacked the Italian fleet in Taranto harbour in November 1940 destroying one battleship and damaging two more in return for very light casualties. This was the first ever aircraft attack on ships in history where the aircraft were launched at sea. In spite of using obsolete aircraft (Hurricanes and Spitfires were already in service with the RAF), the damage they were able to inflict on the Italian Navy is now accepted as being the first indication of the coming supremacy of naval aviation. In 1941, these same aircraft attacked and disabled the Bismarck - one of the finest and most modern battleships afloat, and, in so doing, brought that mighty ship to the mercy of the chasing British fleet.

In this work, author, historian and former Vice-Admiral B. B. Schofield traces the development of British naval aviation which goes all the way back to involvement with the Wright brothers! At every juncture we have a fascinating account as we learn of the opposition to change, the trials and tribulations with airships and early aircraft and the continuing story all the way through WW1 and the inter-war years. Having set the scene so skilfully, we now find a book divided into two separate accounts. Part One - the Attack on Taranto 1940, is divided into six chapters followed by an Epilogue, a series of plans and eight Appendices which cover such subjects as honours and awards, torpedoes fired, ammunition expended, personnel taking part, details of various aircraft and so forth. This is a book in itself and provides the clearest possible explanation of what occurred.

Part Two - the Loss of the Bismarck 1941, is equally as engaging and commences with its own expertly written introduction which, again, sets the scene perfectly. Another 6 chapters provide a full account of the most famous of all sea-chases - explained from both sides of the conflict. Appendices include senior officers, commanding officers and ships taking part, ship's data (both British and German), air data, torpedoes fired, ammunition expended and honours and awards followed by six diagrams. Both parts of the work have their own acknowledgements and bibliography. The book concludes with an Index. In short, we have two books for the price of one!

I was trying to find a single word to describe my enjoyment of having read the book - riveting, enthralling, fascinating, intriguing all sprang to mind. Truth is, this book is supremely well researched and equally as well written. As an example, the only error I found throughout was the most ridiculous `typo' where Appendix VII is shown as Appendix III on the Contents page. If you can live with that, you really will enjoy this book - and learn a great deal about an obsolete type of aircraft into the bargain.

NM
Was this review helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback