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String Theory: Cohesion Bk. 1 (Star Trek: Voyager) Mass Market Paperback – 1 Aug 2005


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books (1 Aug 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743457188
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743457187
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.7 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 775,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Jeffrey Lang launched his Star Trek career with a contribution to the LIVES OF DAX anthology, and is co-author of the Deep Space Nine volume ABYSS in the phenomenally successful Section 31 quartet.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Stevo on 14 Aug 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a great book for Torres and Seven fans. This is probably one of the best Voyager books written. For People Considering buying this book I would also recommend Homecoming by Christie Gloden.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By hazelc1 on 31 July 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
this book was really good.it seems very different from christie goldens writing-less emotions and more action - and the relationship between b'elana and seven is really well written.if you had become a bit bored with the last few voyager books this will be a welcome change.i cant wait for the next in the series!it deserves 5star plus.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By David Roy on 15 Nov 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While being a Star Trek fan for many years, I was never that big of a fan of Voyager. While I liked the characters somewhat, many of the stories just fell flat. Then the re-launch came, with stories that would take place after the ship made it home, and those turned out to be abysmal. Would I ever try a Voyager book again? Thankfully, it's still possible to write a book (or series of books) taking place during the series, and make them good. String Theory: Cohesion is one of those books. Part one of three, Jeffrey Lang has captured everything I liked about the television series while ignoring (or sometimes even explaining) what I didn't like about it. While a bit too "hard science" for my taste, Lang never loses himself in technobabble, something I really appreciate.
Taking place between the fourth and fifth seasons, the Voyager crew has just been disappointed by the fake promise of the U.S.S. Dauntless, a ship that was supposedly from the Federation in order to get them home sooner, but was instead a ruse. Now, continuing their journey, they stumble on a species that shouldn't exist in an area of space that also shouldn't exist. They almost crash into a Monorhan ship, a refugee from a world that is getting closer and closer to oblivion. Voyager technology and expertise may delay or prevent extinction, so Captain Janeway sends Chief Engineer B'elanna Torres and ex-Borg Seven of Nine to the planet to help. But a strange energy wave catapults Voyager into a place beyond the fabric of space time, where radiation extreme oddities in both mental and physical behaviour. Meanwhile, Seven and Torres continue sniping at each other as they try to figure out what happened to Voyager, and what they can do to help before Monorhan authorities can capture them.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 34 reviews
23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
Has the Voyager characters absolutely nailed. 2 July 2005
By Nina M. Osier - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Kathryn Janeway has done it again. She's ordered Voyager off course to investigate an intriguing scientific anomaly, and landed herself and her crew in the middle of an alien species' survival crisis. This time the aliens are called Monorhans, and they're facing extinction because their star system exists in a region of space where the normal laws of physics don't apply. Just the sort of scientific and compassionate puzzle that Janeway - former science officer, explorer, and de facto Federation ambassador to the Delta Quadrant - can't possibly resist.

Jeffrey Lang is a new author for me, although he's written novels based on other Trek series. He has the Voyager characters absolutely nailed. As I read, I often burst out laughing because he'd gotten them so right. The plot is well presented, and the Monorhans - like all good Trek species - are alien enough to be interesting, but have enough in common with Humans so we can understand and empathize with them as individuals.

A terrific read! I hope the next installment of this series, which has a different author, will keep up to the high standard Mr. Lang sets in this opener.
20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
Thoroughly Enjoyable 28 July 2005
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am always reluctant to read the first book in a trilogy if the second and third books aren't being released in quick succession immediately afterwards. Usually if I do, and it's a really good story, I'm left feeling a bit disappointed because I know I have to wait to find out where the story goes from here.

That wasn't the case with Cohesion. Not because the story wasn't good, it's great, and Cohesion definitely did leave me wanting to know what happens next. But at the same time, as I digested the final pages, I felt completely satisfied by the story and that's what impressed me most when I had finished reading Cohesion.

There is a lot to impress about the story told in Cohesion. The plot is interesting and well paced, the action vividly portrayed and the characterizations of the Voyager characters the best I've read since Jeri Taylor's novel Pathways.

The interaction between B'Elanna Torres and Seven of Nine, who are reluctantly forced to work together to survive, is very amusing and one of the highlights of the story. Lang also manages to address some of the inconsistencies in the way the characters were depicted in the television series, an accomplishment that fans of this series should find gratifying but luckily you don't need to be a fan of Voyager to enjoy Cohesion, just a reader who appreciates a really well told story.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
"Cohesion" Delivers 26 Aug 2005
By Antoine D. Reid - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Voyager novels, lately, have left a lot to be desired. The last slew of Voyager novels, part of the series' book relaunch, have had mixed reviews. Characterizations are off, there's not enough action, the focus is wrongly placed. Well, I was curious how this trilogy would turn out, espescially with writers like Jeffrey Lang who haven't penned a Voyager novel before this. I'm pleased to say I was surprised by how good this novel is. I want to say great, but there were a few rough points that kept it from being a five-star novel.

The front cover notes this three-part series as being a "tenth anniversary odyssey." Well, I didn't really get that impression from this novel. If you've seen the episodes "Night," "The Void" and your basic "planet it trouble, Janeway wants to help," then this novel may seem a bit less epic. Even with that, Lang does seem to work hard to put a new spin on things and the plot. I'd say this is a character-driven novel more so than an action-packed adventure. Which is great, we need that in Voyager. It takes place after the episode "Hope and Fear" and before "Night", and it focuses on B'Elanna Torres more so than any character. It also puts a spotlight on her tug-of-war relationship with Seven of Nine.

The characterizations are fairly accurate. I too, like another reviewer, felt Seven of Nine and a few of the things she said weren't very true to how she was on the television show. Yet, she and B'Elanna are put in a great situation that definately isn't like anything we saw on the television. Janeway is beginning to question herself, as we saw in the episode "Night." Perhaps the reasons for that is put out there for the readers to understand her shift in moods between "Hope and Fear" and "Night."

As for the aliens, I felt they were okay. I really wasn't interested in them but I do feel they're getting a good work-out. This is only the first book, so I'm sure they'll have their moment. Also, some of Voyager's underdeveloped characters got a good amount of time in the spotlight. Tuvok, Neelix, even Joe Carey all played a big part in this book. One character didn't dominate the action or attention, besides B'Elanna, but even that was done in moderation. The only character I felt was really off was Tom Paris. Lang's take on him was more like a juvenile. Yeah, he's not the most serious character, but I felt opening the book and having him thinking of mushrooms was a bit much.

If you've been disapointed by Voyager novels in the past, or youthink the Relaunch leaves the crew rather cold, read this book. It definately grabs your attention a few dozen pages in and leaves you wanting more. A great book that explores Janeway's actions, Torres and Seven's relationship and an alien race on the brink of extinction. Yes, definately worth your time and money.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
My favorite characters not themselves 2 Aug 2005
By JensTenebrea - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was looking forward to this book as it focused on two of my favorite characters B'Elanna and Seven. However, I always had the impression that the author did not know the characters at all. This made for a very frustrating read. Some examples:

Seven says "wow" - try and picture that Voy fans, I mean my brain couldn't even do it without laughing

Everyone is called by there first names - now I am not just talking about Tuvok and Chakotay, New characters were introduced and then Janeway we would talking about how great it was that Bill was down in engineering, Ranks apparently disappear during a crisis

Tuvok gets excited about a bean burrito, especially the guacamole - have we watched the show and seen how Tuvok likes the bland plomeek soup? I don't know, but I feel that a burrito is not quite his style

And there was more, but I think you get my point. I just wish that the author had a better handle on the characters. I mean if you are going to meld two of them, shouldn't you have them down individually?

All this said, It was still a worthwile read for a voy book fan. I am sure that I will be suckered into buying the second one when it comes out.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Voyager goes to yet another strange part of space 15 Nov 2005
By David Roy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While being a Star Trek fan for many years, I was never that big of a fan of Voyager. While I liked the characters somewhat, many of the stories just fell flat. Then the re-launch came, with stories that would take place after the ship made it home, and those turned out to be abysmal. Would I ever try a Voyager book again? Thankfully, it's still possible to write a book (or series of books) taking place during the series, and make them good. String Theory: Cohesion is one of those books. Part one of three, Jeffrey Lang has captured everything I liked about the television series while ignoring (or sometimes even explaining) what I didn't like about it. While a bit too "hard science" for my taste, Lang never loses himself in technobabble, something I really appreciate.

Taking place between the fourth and fifth seasons, the Voyager crew has just been disappointed by the fake promise of the U.S.S. Dauntless, a ship that was supposedly from the Federation in order to get them home sooner, but was instead a ruse. Now, continuing their journey, they stumble on a species that shouldn't exist in an area of space that also shouldn't exist. They almost crash into a Monorhan ship, a refugee from a world that is getting closer and closer to oblivion. Voyager technology and expertise may delay or prevent extinction, so Captain Janeway sends Chief Engineer B'elanna Torres and ex-Borg Seven of Nine to the planet to help. But a strange energy wave catapults Voyager into a place beyond the fabric of space time, where radiation extreme oddities in both mental and physical behaviour. Meanwhile, Seven and Torres continue sniping at each other as they try to figure out what happened to Voyager, and what they can do to help before Monorhan authorities can capture them.

I'll get the minor problems out of the way first, as they won't take up much time. First, the editing job is a little rushed. Before (and shortly after) the disaster that takes place at the beginning of the book, each chapter is headed with "disaster minus 6 hours" and the like. However, these don't always match up with the pacing of the book. Janeway makes a comment about it being less than five hours since Harry Kim had mentioned the strange sensor readings, but that doesn't match the chapter heading when that actually happened. A minor annoyance, really, and something that is easily ignored.

Secondly, while Neelix is certainly in character, and I can see every thought that Lang gave to him coming from the television character himself, I found that it made him even more annoying than he was on the show. So kudos to Lang for capturing him so perfectly, but I feel even more like he should be shoved out an airlock now. I just found his thinking about his own importance to the crew, as Morale Officer more than as a chef, getting on my nerves. I guess that's a compliment to the author, though it did make me wish Lang hadn't used him.

Everything else in Cohesion is great, though. Lang has done what every media tie-in needs to do: captured the characters perfectly while putting his own stamp on them. I found Torres' hostility toward Seven completely believable, and Seven's annoyance with Torres' extreme emotionalism was perfect as well. The two of them don't get along well at all, and it's only their professionalism and concern for the fate of Voyager that holds them together. It was especially illuminating when they could see inside each other's mind, and we Seven sees first hand how B'elanna really feels. I especially liked Torres' resistance to stopping their voyage home to help out every downtrodden species they come across. Everybody else on Voyager is captured perfectly too, with the book having that fourth/fifth season feel to it.

Especially effective was a little narrative touch of Lang's. Chakotay and Kathryn Janeway have an interesting relationship, kind of an almost romantic but definitely friends one. Whenever Lang tells a scene from Chakotay's point of view and Janeway does something, he says "Kathryn sat on the chair" rather than "Janeway sat on the chair," which is the way Lang says it from anybody else's point of view. This was a really nice way of capturing that relationship without completely calling attention to it. Not only that, of course, but Chakotay's actions and thoughts throughout the novel ring true to this as well. He seems to be walking that line between friend (and prospective lover?) and first officer, gently chiding her when he thinks she needs to go rest.

Some people have criticized the "super-Janeway" that's in the book, who is able to pretty much do anything. I don't think I agree with that. While she does have her hands in a lot of the little problems going on in the book, this is no different than her portrayal in the series, and actually a bit toned down from that. She dips into some of the engineering problems (which has already been established as one of her specialties), but for the most part she lets her assistant engineers do their jobs without interference. One thing I definitely liked about her (and the rest of the crew's) portrayal is that, when a major accident happens, wiping out a large group of people, they grieve but they don't wallow in that grief, unlike A Time to Sow. They get on with things. They don't blame themselves, which I was expecting.

String Theory: Cohesion is an excellent book, both for the Voyager fan who thinks the re-launch is horrible, as well as for those who are a little nostalgic for the series itself. Even a non-fan may get some enjoyment out of it. An excellent start to the series.

David Roy
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