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Street Of Dreams (Rudy Van Gelder Edition)
 
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Street Of Dreams (Rudy Van Gelder Edition)

24 Feb. 2009 | Format: MP3

£6.59 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
8:45
30
2
7:43
30
3
9:01
30
4
8:01
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 10 Feb. 2009
  • Release Date: 24 Feb. 2009
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2009 The Blue Note Label Group
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 33:30
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001Q1SOQY
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 70,228 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 April 2001
Format: Audio CD
Recorded on November 16, 1964, Grant Green's "Street of Dreams" is the third of four Blue Note albums featuring the guitar-organ trio of Grant Green, Larry Young and drummer Elvin Jones. The first album, Grant Green's "Talkin' About," featured only the aforementioned trio, but on the other three dates, a different musician was brought in for each session to form memorable quartets. Larry Young's "Into Somethin'" featured Sam Rivers on tenor sax, Grant Green's "I Want To Hold Your Hand" included Hank Mobley, and "Street of Dreams" benefited from the contributions of Bobby Hutcherson on vibes. The combinations the "Street of Dreams" quartet came up with are truly magical -- Green's smooth licks and perfect passes, Young's probing but never overpowering organ, Hutch's delicate yet percussive vibes compliments, and Elvin's poly-rhythmic stickwork combine to form some truly magical playing and improvising. This is by no means your typical organ soul jazz title, but is instead a modern jazz masterpiece. It is one of the those albums I never tire of listening to, particularly at sunset. Ah, to live on the "Street of Dreams."
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Format: Audio CD
This is my favourite of many great Grant Green sessions. The band (Elvin Jones, Larry Young, Bobby Hutcherson) and the material draw the leader into his most creative form, and maintain a sound that manages to be both comfortable and quietly challenging throughout.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 24 reviews
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
Hypnotic stuff from a fine band 17 April 2001
By N. Dorward - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Perhaps it's a bit odd that while the 1950s and 1960s threw up many notable guitarists--Montgomery, Galbraith, Puma, Hall, Ellis, Lowe, Pass, &c--they mostly tended to the quieter end of the spectrum: the guitar wasn't frequently encountered in the tough-as-nails, abrasive music known as hard bop. The only two guitarists to have made much of an impact at Blue Note, the home of hard bop, were Kenny Burrell & Grant Green. Green was a guitarist blessed with the ability to make just about anything sound good; even something as unpromising as "Moon River" (on _The Complete Quartets with Sonny Clark_) in his hands becomes convincing & impeccable jazz. His playing was supremely melodic, unornamented & relaxed; his sound was delicate, but surprisingly adaptable to even the toughest of hard bop contexts. He recorded in a lot of settings; at the time Blue Note seemed mostly interested in his more commercially-oriented work (gospel, blues, organ trio, Latin, pop standards), & it was only after Green's untimely death in the late 1970s that a lot of Green's most important & grittiest work was released, like a pair of albums with McCoy Tyner & Elvin Jones in the rhythm section, or a clutch of discs with Sonny Clark on piano. Unfortunately, as the 1960s wore on like many jazz musicians (& especially guitarists--think of Montgomery & Benson) Green more & more turned to commercially-oriented music; but his numerous mid-1960s discs amply document a figure who is as much a neglected master as, say, Sonny Clark or Herbie Nichols (though like them he is finally getting his due).
This album was released during Green's life, fortunately, & remains one of his best. The band features Larry Young on organ, Bobby Hutcherson on vibes & Elvin Jones on drums. If at a casual glance the setlist looks more "commercial" than an album like _Idle Moments_ (Green's finest album as a leader), given that it is dependent on standards rather than originals, don't let that fool you. The best of these four long, relaxed performances is a version of "Lazy Afternoon", reworked into a 5/4 groove, the theme given a tranced, elongated reading. But all four tracks are memorable, unfolding gently, with an almost mesmerizing shimmer. Despite its being on the Blue Note label, this disc is as introspective of mood as a contemporary Bill Evans trio date.
The players on this disc crossed paths several times again. The Green/Young/Jones axis frequently appeared in Van Gelder's studio: they also recorded Green's _Talkin' About_, Young's _Into Somethin'_ (with Sam Rivers), & Green's _I Want to Hold Your Hand_ (with Hank Mobley; the title track is another fine instance of Green's ability to make compelling jazz out of unlikely material)--if none of these discs quite touches _Street of Dreams_ they are still all rewarding listens. Bobby Hutcherson was also a key component of _Idle Moments_, which stands as Green's greatest achievement on disc.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
The Real Life "Street of Dreams" 25 Feb. 2009
By Michael Brad Richman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This RVG reissue is a bit of a head-scratcher as the original CD is still readily available, but it's a classic so I won't complain. Recorded on November 16, 1964, Grant Green's "Street of Dreams" is the third of four Blue Note albums featuring the guitar-organ trio of Grant Green, Larry Young and drummer Elvin Jones. The first album, Grant Green's "Talkin' About," featured only the aforementioned trio, but on the other three dates, a different musician was brought in for each session to form memorable quartets. Larry Young's "Into Somethin'" featured Sam Rivers on tenor sax, Grant Green's I Want to Hold Your Hand (see my review) included Hank Mobley, and "Street of Dreams" benefited from the contributions of Bobby Hutcherson on vibes. The combinations the "Street of Dreams" quartet came up with are truly magical -- Green's smooth licks and perfect passes, Young's probing but never overpowering organ, Hutch's delicate yet percussive vibes compliments, and Elvin's poly-rhythmic stickwork combine to form some truly magical playing and improvising. This is by no means your typical organ soul jazz title, but is instead a modern jazz masterpiece. It is one of the those albums I never tire of listening to, particularly at sunset. Ahhh, to live on the "Street of Dreams."
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
True Jazz from True Jazz Artists 2 July 2003
By Music 4 Life - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This album is one of my favorites because the band gels so nicely. Often times, you can set up the best musician at each spot and have absolutely no chemistry. In this case however, the best at each spot have tremendous chemistry. Green of course holds his own, but especially when he plays with Larry Young. "Somewhere in the Night" lets us hear Young's chords and tri-tones in a subtle setting, but it exemplifies his one-of-kind style and greatness. Jones doesn't need to do much but keep the rythym, which he always does very well. Hutcherson on the vibes...this guy kills. He adds a unique touch to these standards of which we are not accustomed to hearing with vibes included. But, it works...making this an excellent album, especially when you just wanna kick back and really enjoy and admire some real jazz.
-Peace-
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Green-Young-Jones on a Street of Dreams 15 Nov. 2012
By D.R.L. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
~ During the autumn 1964 - spring 1965 period the trio of Grant Green (guitar), Larry Young (organ), and Elvin Jones (drums) recorded four stellar sessions for Blue Note records. This review summarizes the four resulting albums / CDs so that the reader can make an informed buying decision.
~ At the time of these recordings, Grant Green was already an established star and served as `the house guitarist' for Blue Note. Over the years, Green would record with a virtual who's who of the jazz organ (including Brother Jack McDuff, Sam Lazar, Baby Face Willette, Gloria Coleman, Big John Patton, and Jimmy Smith); however, nothing surpasses his guitar-organ-drums sessions with Larry Young and Elvin Jones. At the time of these recordings, Jones was best known as the hard-driving drummer in the John Coltrane band, while Larry Young was earning a reputation as "the John Coltrane of the organ" because of his distinctive modal approach to the Hammond B-3 at a time when Jimmy Smith's blues-based soul-jazz style defined the sound of the organ. Indeed, the Young-Green-Jones recordings represent a significant departure from the earlier soul-jazz recordings that Green made with organist Big John Patton and drummer Ben Dixon. While Green and Young get much of the credit for the harmonic and melodic success of these four albums, the contribution of Elvin Jones is significant and invaluable.
~ Green's 41 minute "Talkin About" album was recorded on 11 September 1964 and features the Young-Green-Jones trio. Green had recently recorded "Matador" and "Solid", two of his most advanced albums, with McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones of the John Coltrane quartet. With "Talkin' About", Green continued to advance in the modal direction he started exploring with the two previous outings; Young and Jones provide there perfect partners for Green's progress. The trio finds a suitable middle ground between the soul-jazz of Green's early days and the modal flavor of his most recent work. Though Young's style was not fully developed yet, he is no longer simply a Jimmy Smith disciple; his playing here is far more adventurous than the typical soul-jazz date, both harmonically and rhythmically. Jones and Young often play off one another to create an intricate pulse that is far removed from the standard soul-jazz groove. The trio's interplay is best showcased on Young's 12 minute tribute to Coltrane, "Talkin' About J.C." and the playful "I'm an Old Cowhand". Young and Green show particularly effective interactions on the ballads "People" and "You Don't Know What Love Is".
~ Young's 48 minute debut as a leader on Blue Note was the wonderful "Into Somethin" album recorded 12 November 1964. Tenor sax man Sam Rivers adds his distinctive voice to the Young-Green-Jones trio. The quartet performs four Young originals plus Green's Other than the blues "Backup," the music is fairly complex, grooving in its own fashion and showing that Young was absorbing Coltrane's modal excursions. Stand outs include Young's relaxed groove "Tyrone", Green's Spanish-tinged "Plaza de Toros", Young's gentle "Paris Eyes", and the blues "Backup". Two versions of Young's "Ritha" are included; one with and one without sax.
~ The Young-Green-Jones trio recorded again on 16 November 1964, this time with Bobby Hutcherson on vibes. The results of this session were released as Green's 35-minute album "Street of Dreams". Compared to other recordings by the Young-Green-Jones trio, "Street of Dreams" presents a rather mellow, dreamy atmosphere. There are only four selections, all standards and all around eight to ten minutes long. The musicians approach the tunes as extended mood pieces, creating a marvelously light, cool atmosphere. Hutcherson is the perfect addition for this project, able to blend in with the modal advancement of the rest of the ensemble while adding his clear, shimmering tone to the overall texture of the album. All the musicians play with a delicate touch that is distinct from the modal soul-jazz on "Talkin' About". There are no fireworks or funky grooves here; the general feel of the album is thoughtful and introspective rather than romantic.
~ On 31 March 1965, the Young-Green-Jones trio recorded their last session as a unit; this time with Hank Mobley added on tenor sax. The resulting 41 minute "I Want to Hold Your Hand" album continues the soft, easy style of the "Street of Dreams" album. However, this time the music is less reflective and more romantic and outwardly engaging. Mobley's breathy, sensuous warmth keeps the album simmering at a low boil, especially on "Speak Low". The repertoire mixes romantic ballad standards like "Stella By Starlight"and gently undulating bossa novas. The title track by Lennon and McCartney is cleverly adapted and arranged into perfectly viable jazz that suits Green's elegant touch with pop standards. The other bossa nova, Jobim's "Corcovado," is given a wonderfully caressing treatment. Even with all the straightforward pop overtones of much of the material, the quartet's playing is still subtly advanced, both in its rhythmic interaction and the soloists' harmonic choices.
~ All four of these CDs are excellent, albeit brief. If you can afford all four, go for it. If you can only afford one or two of the CDs, hopefully the descriptions above are helpful.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The House Band For The "Street of Dreams" 1 April 2001
By Michael Brad Richman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Recorded on November 16, 1964, Grant Green's "Street of Dreams" is the third of four Blue Note albums featuring the guitar-organ trio of Grant Green, Larry Young and drummer Elvin Jones. The first album, Grant Green's "Talkin' About," featured only the aforementioned trio, but on the other three dates, a different musician was brought in for each session to form memorable quartets. Larry Young's "Into Somethin'" featured Sam Rivers on tenor sax, Grant Green's "I Want To Hold Your Hand" included Hank Mobley, and "Street of Dreams" benefited from the contributions of Bobby Hutcherson on vibes. The combinations the "Street of Dreams" quartet came up with are truly magical -- Green's smooth licks and perfect passes, Young's probing but never overpowering organ, Hutch's delicate yet percussive vibes compliments, and Elvin's poly-rhythmic stickwork combine to form some truly magical playing and improvising. This is by no means your typical organ soul jazz title, but is instead a modern jazz masterpiece. It is one of the those albums I never tire of listening to, particularly at sunset. Ah, to live on the "Street of Dreams."
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