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Streamlined Object Modeling: Patterns, Rules and Implementation (Coad Series) [Paperback]

Jill Nicola , Mark Mayfield , Mike Abney
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 37.99
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Book Description

21 Sep 2001 0130668397 978-0130668394 1

  • A rigorous and practical framework for modeling business systems
  • Pares object modeling down to its core concepts, making it easier than ever.
  • Twelve object collaboration patterns that address virtually any business scenario
  • Powerful techniques–not fancy notation!

Streamlined Object Modeling presents the first rigorous, practical framework for object modeling complex business domains, rules, and systems. Three world-renowned leaders in object development have pared object modeling down to the core concepts for all business domains, business rules, and business services. Starting from the first principles of "object think," the authors offer a fully integrated approach to building, validating, and critiquing object models. Coverage includes:

  • Proven principles and techniques for successfully modeling the structure and operations of any business domain.
  • Guidelines for finding and associating objects, assembling object models, and distributing system behavior among objects.
  • Rigorous methods for discovering, organizing, and implementing business rules around objects.
  • Twelve all-encompassing "collaboration patterns"–what they represent, how they relate, and how to apply them.
  • Five kinds of business rules, three types of services, and six categories of properties completely specify object-oriented business requirements

From start to finish, the book makes extensive use of examples drawn from real commercial applications. To illustrate how streamlined object modeling flows from analysis to code, it also presents a complete case study derived from a real-world application, and implemented in two leading object-oriented languages-Java, and the Squeak implementation of Smalltalk.

 


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Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 1 edition (21 Sep 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0130668397
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130668394
  • Product Dimensions: 2.2 x 17.3 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,599,562 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Authors

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Product Description

From the Back Cover

  • A rigorous and practical framework for modeling business systems
  • Pares object modeling down to its core concepts, making it easier than ever.
  • Twelve object collaboration patterns that address virtually any business scenario
  • Powerful techniques—not fancy notation!

The first rigorous and practical approach for modeling complex business domains, rules, and systems.

Streamlined Object Modeling presents the first rigorous, practical framework for object modeling complex business domains, rules, and systems. Three world-renowned leaders in object development have pared object modeling down to the core concepts for all business domains, business rules, and business services. Starting from the first principles of "object think," the authors offer a fully integrated approach to building, validating, and critiquing object models. Coverage includes:

  • Proven principles and techniques for successfully modeling the structure and operations of any business domain.
  • Guidelines for finding and associating objects, assembling object models, and distributing system behavior among objects.
  • Rigorous methods for discovering, organizing, and implementing business rules around objects.
  • Twelve all-encompassing "collaboration patterns"—what they represent, how they relate, and how to apply them.
  • Five kinds of business rules, three types of services, and six categories of properties completely specify object-oriented business requirements

From start to finish, the book makes extensive use of examples drawn from real commercial applications. To illustrate how streamlined object modeling flows from analysis to code, it also presents a complete case study derived from a real-world application, and implemented in two leading object-oriented languages-Java, and the Squeak implementation of Smalltalk.

About the Author

JILL NICOLA is an independent software consultant in Houston, TX who has worked in object-oriented software for over 15 years as a programmer, mentor, modeler, and architect. She specializes in helping organizations apply object techniques to develop strategies and model business processes, and co-authored Object-Oriented Programming with Peter Coad.

MARK MAYFIELD is the Object Guru at Chelsea Market Systems in Houston, TX. A leading authority on object modeling patterns, he has created hundreds of object models in a wide range of commercial environments, and co-authored Object Models: Strategies, Patterns, & Applications and Java Design with Peter Coad.

MIKE ABNEY is a Senior Java Developer at Chelsea Market Systems in Houston, TX who has performed many roles in software development, including analysis, user interface and software architecture design, coding, and project management.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad, but misses a lot 16 Jun 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This book comes with a wealth of ideas about object modelling. It basically sets out a set of 12 analysis patterns that together deal with all business problems one might encounter. There are lots of interesting tips about object modelling and "object think"ing. However this book is severely lacking in a few respects. Mapping the patterns properly to design/implementation isnt covered - the authors state categorically that their implementation part is not "production level". They also mention looking out for a new book that deals with these shortcomings. Coupled with this is their intention on padding out the book with both Java and Smalltalk examples. Theres no need for both, certainly in the body of the text. The paper is thick, and borders are large, and the last half of the book is full of java and smalltalk examples. I had high hopes, but have put the book down after finishing it, feeling a little cheated.
This book does come with a lot of sound object thinking knowledge, and for this alone I feel I could give it a 3. Without - had they not bothered to put good explanations about thinking in objects - then the book would have been given a 2.
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Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  13 reviews
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a MUST read - worldclass, best-practice domain modeling 10 Oct 2002
By hjc - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
As others have stated, the content of this book is a tremendously important contribution to object-oriented analysis and modeling. The authors have successfully analyzed and pared down OOA to it's very essentials. Until you read this book you will not truly understand the significance of this. They have discovered an amazingly small set of irreducible patterns (not to be confused with design patterns, these are analysis patterns) and rules which can be applied to the modeling of any business domain - large or small, simple or complex. And which, when applied, lead to accurate and consistent models in the most direct and timely manner possible. No matter what methodology you subscribe to, if modeling the domain is one of the practices then this is how the modeling should be done. Study the patterns and rules, internalize them, your productivity will soar, your colleagues and customers will consider you a genius. It should not be hard as the presentation is clear and logical and the patterns and rules themselves have the simple elegance that fundamentally correct solutions usually exhibit. However, the authors are not ivory-tower academics presenting some arcane theory that is purely descriptive. They are practitioners with years of real-world experience, thus they show us the whats AND the hows. And they do not stop at analysis, the authors also do us the great favor of showing us how these patterns and rules actually end up being implemented in real code. This book now sits at my side as an essential reference. I plan to refer to it for my work, of course, but also to 'test' models I come across in other books.
I'm very surprised at the low Amazon.com sales rank of such a unique, insightful, and practical book. With agile and "extreme" methods and practices all the rage you would think a streamlined, dare I say 'agile', approach to modeling would have recieved more attention. I suppose the publisher missed a great opportunity by not putting "Agile" somewhere in the title. Having been the XP 'evangelist' and coach on an XP project I think it even has a place in XP (though purists will argue that point). This is my biggest problem with XP - XP recommends coming up with a "metaphor" for an application which gives the project "conceptual integrity" and will allow the customer and programmers to communicate clearly about the application. In the famous C3 payroll system project the sytem was likened to a manufacturing line in which paychecks were 'assembled' from hour 'parts' and various other 'parts'. Sorry, it may have worked but it is overly contrived and not "the simplest thing that could possibly work and no simpler". The other problem is that Beck himself says that coming up with a useful metaphor cannot be taught and that he can only come up with one on half his projects. So what if, instead of racking your brain to come up with a useful metaphor, which you will only come up with 50% of the time at best, you used a simple-as-possible-but-no-simpler modeling approach to model the *actual* business domain? Wouldn't that model provide the necessary "conceptual integrity" for the system under development and allow the customer and programmers to communicate clearly about the system, and do so *directly*? In the C3 case, paychecks would be paychecks and hours would be hours. No translating back and forth between different domains. I understand the purpose of having a good metaphor - to capture and allow communication of the essential entities and of the essential relationships between those entities. But I think that creating a basic domain model, quickly and iteratively, by applying the patterns, rules and techniques in Streamlined Object Modeling, is a cleaner and more direct practice than metaphors and fits in fine with XP. And creating such a domain model is possible not just 50% of the time, but 100% of the time. (The authors do make certain suggestions and recommendations here and there reflecting their own methodology and implementation preferences which do not always jive with agile and, especially, XP practices. But those are easily identified and agile/XP practitioners should not allowed them to distract from the core of this work.)
In the interest of full disclosure I should state I know and have had the privilege of working with all three of the authors. They gave me an early draft and I did not read it. The book was published and they gave me a copy and I did not read it. Sorry, guys and gal! But finally, this past week, I got around to reading it. Fantastic piece of work. I just wish I would have read it sooner!
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great tutorial and reference 11 May 2002
By Matthew T. Adams - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
After reading the book the first time and assimilating its content, I started applying it in one of the object models I was working on. I used the Streamlined Object Modeling techniques a little bit at first, and, after realizing some of the great benefits, I used them extensively, refactoring my model according to the book's principles. I've got yellow sticky notes throughout it, as it serves as a reference for me now; I wouldn't want to do analysis, design, or implementation without it.
When I discovered Peter Coad's Object Modeling in Color book (ISBN 013011510X), where I was introduced to his "domain neutral component" (DNC), I had an epiphany. Then, after experiencing the fractal application of the DNC, I started to notice the patterns that Nicola, Mayfield, and Abney lay down quite nicely. It is a natural maturation of thought from Coad's DNC; Coad himself even acknowledges the importance of the book.
If you want to become a good object oriented analyst, read this book, then read it again. If you think you're a good object oriented analyst, read this book, then read it again. In either case, after applying the principles described, I think you'll wonder how you ever got along without them.
Kudos to Nicola, Mayfield, and Abney for an intellectual milestone in object oriented technology. I wish someone had handed this book to me when I first started working with object oriented languages.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be called Model Engineering 31 Aug 2003
By Patrick Thompson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is one of those books that comes along every now and then- that only the fortunate few find and buy and think, what a truly insightful peice of work. This book is one of those times. ANd consider yourself fortunate that you have found it. And to make it even cooler: it is actually good to read!
It is both a philosphical and technical blueprint for the modeling process: forget use cases and such. This is about modeling the domain using twelve pattern players that, alone and in combination, describe virtually all domains. Twelve simple pieces that can be snapped together to make extremely complex models that are robust, resilient and extensible. Amazing stuff.
At 400 pages this is the perfect size book: there is no bloat...just a fortright exposition that well explained and diagramed. This isn't a book burdened with UML (I have a beginners guide to UML that is about the same thickness...UML has lost its way: it's become ridiculously bloated and cubersome and oh so self-important). This book helps your pare away the edifice of UML that adds major complexity to the modelign process and get down to the point of the exercise: modeling. Simple.
This book will give you a set of tools for analayzing domains efficiently: because you will permeate what it teaches you through all your domain analyses, which then make the process easier, quicker, and more effective and the net result will be better and stronger. Then you can layer as much UML on it as you like (UML is like butter, full of cholestorol that clogs the arteries). I guess you could call the tools it teaches you- Rapid Modeling.
This is a good book. Try it and find out. Definintely 5 stars.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The "Aha!" of object-modeling 13 Feb 2004
By Eric Torreborre - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I dont exactly remember on which mailing-list I saw this book mentioned but I will never regret my curiosity on that day.
I had been practising object modeling for some time before I read that book and was, at times, wondering :
-what could be the right objects in that situation ?
-where should I put this behavior ?
-do I need "services/processes" objects to operate on my "domain" objects ?
This book gave me really precious answers :
-use the patterns to identify objects
-Let the objects do the work
-Let the object that has the knowledge do the work that requires this knowledge.
I have been practising on new projects since and found the lessons invaluable.
That's why I am not surprised at all about other reviews and I have been recommending the book around me ever since.
The fundamental complexity of business systems is business, not transactions, persistence, gui or any other technical aspect. We have many years of experience with technical matters but we often strive to preserve/improve business value in the systems we build.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Tutorial for New Modelers 1 Jun 2002
By David C. Veeneman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I'm relatively new to modeling and object programming. Up to this point, I have struggled to find objects and to develop their attributes and their relationships with other objects. This book has broken that barrier for me. It describes an intuitive set of patterns and rules for analyzing and modeling the business systems that form the basis of most software. The patterns are like pieces of an Erector set. Each one is simple; they are combined to form structures as complex as one needs. The rules describe how to combine the patterns. The Java prototypes are straightforward and easily implemented, providing a complete framework for development. If you are just starting out in modeling, I would recommend UML Distilled for an overview of UML and this book for a tutorial on how to use it. I'm moving a lot of other modeling and pattern books to the back room-- I think this book will be my primary modeling resource for the forseeable future.
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