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Strauss, R.: Der Rosenkavalier Box set


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Product details

  • Audio CD (3 Sep 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • ASIN: B00507ZQX4
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,964 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - IntroductionChristian Thielemann 3:00£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Wie du warst!"Christian Thielemann 9:12£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Marie Theres'!" - "Octavian!"Christian Thielemann 3:23£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Quinquin, es ist mein Mann!"Christian Thielemann 3:52£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Selbstverständlich empfängt mich Ihro Gnaden"Christian Thielemann 8:49£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Hat Sie schon einmal mit einem Kavalier"Christian Thielemann 3:14£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Nein, er agiert mir gar zu gut!"Christian Thielemann 4:11£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "I komm' glei"Nina Amon 2:20£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Di rigori armato il seno"Christian Thielemann 3:16£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Als Morgengabe"Christian Thielemann 3:23£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Mein lieber Hippolyte"Christian Thielemann 3:57£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Da geht er hin, der aufgeblasene schlechte Kerl"Christian Thielemann 5:30£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Ach! Du bist wieder da!"Christian Thielemann 6:18£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Die Zeit ist...Mein schöner Schatz...Ich werde jetzt"Christian Thielemann10:45£1.49  Buy MP3 
Listen15. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 1 - "Ich hab' ihn nicht einmal geküßtJens Waldig 3:58£0.79  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - Introduction - "Ein ernster Tag"Christian Thielemann 2:04£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "In dieser feierlichen Stunde"Christian Thielemann 3:52£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Mir ist die Ehre widerfahren"Christian Thielemann 7:29£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Ich kenn' Ihn schon recht wohl"Christian Thielemann 4:19£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Jetzt aber kommt mein Herr Zukünftiger"Christian Thielemann 3:14£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Eh bien! Nun plauder Sie uns eins"Christian Thielemann 6:56£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Wird Sie das Mannsbild da heiraten"Christian Thielemann 6:30£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Herr Baron von Lerchenau!"Christian Thielemann 4:51£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Mord! Mord! Mein Blut!"Christian Thielemann 2:16£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Herr Schwiegersohn! Wie ist ihm denn?"Christian Thielemann 2:57£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Blamage! Mir auseinander meine Eh'"Christian Thielemann 2:47£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Is gut! Is gut! Ein Schluck"Christian Thielemann 2:20£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Da lieg' ich!"Christian Thielemann 5:37£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 2 - "Ohne mich, ohne mich, jeder Tag dir so bang"Christian Thielemann 6:52£0.79  Buy MP3 


Disc 3:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - Introduction and PantomimeChristian Thielemann 7:41£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Hab'n Euer Gnaden noch weitre Befehle?"Jorg Espenkott 2:56£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Nein, nein, nein, nein! I trink' kein Wein"Christian Thielemann 7:40£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Es ist ja eh all's eins"Christian Thielemann 2:48£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Da und da und da und da"Christian Thielemann 2:44£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Halt! Keiner rührt sich!"Christian Thielemann 2:21£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Zur Stelle! Was wird von mir gewünscht?"Christian Thielemann 3:37£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Sind desto eher im klaren"Christian Thielemann 1:35£0.39  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Bin glücklich über Massen"Christian Thielemann 3:05£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Laß er nur gut sein und verschwind Er"Christian Thielemann 8:16£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Leopold, wir gehn!"Christian Thielemann 2:02£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Mein Gott, es war nicht mehr als eine Farce"Christian Thielemann 7:50£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Marie Theres'!" - "Hab mir's gelobt, Ihn lieb zu haben"Christian Thielemann 5:06£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. R. Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier, Op.59 / Act 3 - "Ist ein Traum, kann nicht wirklich sein"Christian Thielemann 8:12£0.79  Buy MP3 

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER on 31 Oct 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It's somewhat surprising that with the release of this recording, there have only been 3 newly recorded sets issued since the beginning of the Digital Recording era, though there have been plenty of welcome reissues and first time issues of live performances from the past. Considering the work's popularity, one would have expected more. Just as surprising is that considering her "bankability" as a recording artist, especially in the USA, there has been no complete recording of Renee Fleming's Marschallin- though there are plenty of extracts on various discs. (That's not quite true-there is a live 2000 Met performance under Levine available from Celestial Audio in Australia-a superb performance with very good if not great sound quality processed from radio broadcasts, but that is not in wide circulation.)
I first bought this performance on its release as a Blu-ray, and I have to say that though I am not a particular fan of this medium for opera, it is one of the most successful I can recall. I immediately thought again that Universal (Decca, DG etc.) were missing a trick, as they have for so long with the Carlos Kleiber Vienna DVD, in not releasing a purely audio version, and finally, a couple of years later, here it is-and very fine it is too.
Recorded in 2009 in the Festspielhaus Baden-Baden, a luxury venue which is to be the new home of the Berlin Philharmonic's Easter Festival from next year (i.e 2013), the sound is vivid, detailed and with plenty of perspective. The acoustic is neutral, typical of modern venues, and if there is a lack of resonance this is offset by no dryness either. This allows a very realistic sound picture for orchestra and singers alike. The audience appears to be absent, so unobtrusive are they-the clapping after the Italian Tenor's aria is onstage.
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Format: Audio CD
This most elegant and sumptuous of Grand Operas demands the finest of orchestras and the most silkily vibrant of soprano voices. There haven't been too many recordings of note, either studio or live, in the digital era, hence this reviewer finds himself referring back to the established classics by Karajan, Solti, Bernstein and Kleiber (père et fils) to establish a benchmark against which this latest issue from Decca may be judged.

Certainly we may gauge the quality of the Münchner Philharmoniker in such passages as the extended Prelude and Pantomime opening Act III. They do not have the quite the lush, voluptuous heft of the Vienna Philharmonic under Solti but they play under Thielemann with nuance, drive and wit, and in moments such as the orchestral introduction to the Presentation of the Silver Rose they capture beautifully the requisite shimmering quality and otherworldly poise, despite the rather flat acoustic of the Festspielhaus as recorded. Thielemann's direction is not unduly indulgent; he gave notice of his affinity with operatic Strauss in his excellent rendition of the suite from "Der Rosenkavalier" as an adjunct to a truly impressive his "Ein Alpensinfonie" on DG in 2000 and here he brings out both the contrapuntal brilliance and the gorgeous, swooning harmonies of Strauss's writing in a performance which demonstrates his mastery of the idiom. The audience is quiet and the aural picture here is clean, clear and well-balanced if rather "neutral" and lacking ambience, allowing us to hear details without being very "present".

So already in terms of conducting, orchestral playing and recorded sound, this recording is competitive without necessarily jumping to the head of the queue. That leaves the voices...
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Entartete Musik on 17 Oct 2012
Format: Audio CD
Christian Thielemann is one of the greatest Straussians working today. And with a cast that includes Renée Fleming, Sophie Koch, Diana Damrau, Franz Hawlata and Franz Grundheber, his Der Rosenkavalier is a rose worth catching. Even though Thielemann has a lot to say about this irrepressibly humane comedy, this 2009 account cannot quite top other versions available in the sizeable Rosenkavalier library.

Given the serious and firm-intentioned repertoire that Thielemann covers, the most surprising element in this new recording - taken from a live performance in Baden Baden - is its vivacity and wit. This is not only due to tempo but the contrapuntal clarity Thielemann finds in Strauss's orchestral textures. Taking Hofmannsthal at his word, he delivers a decidedly comic performance (of which Grundheber's jumped-up Faninal is a positive highlight). Others may wish to gorge on Bernstein's lavish tempi, but such bounties disrupt the line of an already distended work. Thielemann has learned that lesson through time in the theatre.

Sometimes the combination of buffa antics and the live capture gives rise to crudeness. Franz Hawlata was no doubt highly amusing as Ochs on stage, but occasional approximations of the music pale on repeated listening. Fleming and a velvety Koch likewise bring a note of conversation to their scenes, though in that context it inspires a charming intimacy.

Having whipped the levée into a froth, the emotional aftermath is decidedly existential and Thielemann finds a confessional tone for Fleming's great monologue in Act 1. If she lacks the true vocal finesse of Schwarzkopf or Crespin - both of whom float 'Da drin ist die silberne Ros'n' more angelically - there is a comparative level of emotional insight.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Not a classic but valuable for Fleming's Marschallin 26 Nov 2012
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This most elegant and sumptuous of Grand Operas demands the finest of orchestras and the most silkily vibrant of soprano voices. There haven't been too many recordings of note, either studio or live, in the digital era, hence this reviewer finds himself referring back to the established classics by Karajan, Solti, Bernstein and Kleiber (père et fils) to establish a benchmark against which this latest issue from Decca may be judged.

Certainly we may gauge the quality of the Münchner Philharmoniker in such passages as the extended Prelude and Pantomime opening Act III. They do not have the quite the lush, voluptuous heft of the Vienna Philharmonic under Solti but they play under Thielemann with nuance, drive and wit, and in moments such as the orchestral introduction to the Presentation of the Silver Rose they capture beautifully the requisite shimmering quality and otherworldly poise, despite the rather flat acoustic of the Festspielhaus as recorded. Thielemann's direction is not unduly indulgent; he gave notice of his affinity with operatic Strauss in his excellent rendition of the suite from "Der Rosenkavalier" as an adjunct to a truly impressive his "Ein Alpensinfonie" on DG in 2000 and here he brings out both the contrapuntal brilliance and the gorgeous, swooning harmonies of Strauss's writing in a performance which demonstrates his mastery of the idiom. The audience is quiet and the aural picture here is clean, clear and well-balanced if rather "neutral" and lacking ambience, allowing us to hear details without being very "present".

So already in terms of conducting, orchestral playing and recorded sound, this recording is competitive without necessarily jumping to the head of the queue. That leaves the voices...and that's where my doubts creep in.

Yet two singers are simply glorious. Just in time, we finally have a commercial recording, albeit live rather than studio, of today's premier Strauss soprano in her best role. To my ears there is little indication of wear in Renée Fleming's smoky, creamy soprano and long experience as the Marschallin has lent her interpretation more depth of expression. She sounds mature but never middle-aged. The Marschallin should still be a young woman in a loveless marriage dallying with a toyboy; Fleming's rich, long-breathed tones capture all her wry, wistful, rueful resignation without turning her into a caricature of a desperate matron. She is warm and poignant, often capitalising on the tangy resonance of her lower register to balance the floated top notes and she is especially touching at key moments such as when she narrates getting up in the night to stop all the clocks in her attempts to halt the march of time.

Just as impressive is Jonas Kaufmann's preening Italian singer, effortlessly delivering an impassioned account of the retrospective aria in that wonderfully virile, baritonal tenor - it's a shame about the intrusive on-stage applause which cuts across the end of his commanding command performance.

Hawlata's Ochs is, for all its comic inventiveness, vocally a disappointment. I am glad that he doesn't take the modern route of turning him into a menacing thug; he is essentially a risible buffoon, somewhat broadly characterised in a manner which is often coarse, whereas previous celebrated exponents such as Jungwirth, Ridderbusch and, above all, Moll, allow us to remember that he is still an aristocrat, albeit a boorish one. The heavy Ober Österreich accent is amusing but his bass is dry, lacking the rotund low notes and either straining at or crooning his top F's and F sharps.

Likewise, the veteran Franz Grundheber's Faninal is amusing but vocally close to an embarrassment, his baritone being so rocky and hollow. Supporting roles are adequate without being striking or especially pleasing on the ear.

However, the real problems start with the dreaded wobble which afflicts the voices of both Sophie Koch and, more intermittently, Diana Damrau. I recently reviewed Damrau's Donna Anna in the new "Don Giovanni" from a concert performance in the same venue as this recording and by 2011 the vibrato had begun to loosen distressingly. Here, two years earlier, the tendency is merely incipient; she is true and musical but without purity and steadiness of tonal emission still cannot hold a candle to the likes of Kathleen Battle, Lucia Popp or Barbara Bonney. Similarly, the continuous, obtrusive beat in Koch's mezzo-soprano makes her sound excessively womanly in a bosomy fashion rather boyishly impetuous. When Octavian launches the famous concluding trio we should be swept along on a warm raft of steady sound, not bothered by lumpy tone. There is an egregious contrast between the sweet pulse of Fleming's voice and the puttering of her soprano companions. This is not a constant issue and some may be far less sensitised to than I; I readily admit that the great climaxes still worked their magic for me and I often forgot my objections.

Attractively packaged with a full libretto in two sections, ultimately this is not another classic set but one which will appeal primarily to the many admirers of Fleming.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Not quite 5 stars for this amiable, joyous and angst free recording! 1 Nov 2012
By D. S. CROWE - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It's somewhat surprising that with the release of this recording, there have only been 3 newly recorded sets issued since the beginning of the Digital Recording era, though there have been plenty of welcome reissues and first time issues of live performances from the past. Considering the work's popularity, one would have expected more. Just as surprising is that considering her "bankability" as a recording artist, especially in the USA, there has been no complete recording of Renee Fleming's Marschallin- though there are plenty of extracts on various discs. (That's not quite true-there is a live 2000 Met performance under Levine available from Celestial Audio in Australia-a superb performance with very good if not great sound quality processed from radio broadcasts, but that is not in wide circulation.)
I first bought this performance on its release as a Blu-ray, and I have to say that though I am not a particular fan of this medium for opera, it is one of the most successful I can recall. I immediately thought again that Universal (Decca, DG etc.) were missing a trick, as they have for so long with the Carlos Kleiber Vienna DVD, in not releasing a purely audio version, and finally, a couple of years later, here it is-and very fine it is too.
Recorded in 2009 in the Festspielhaus Baden-Baden, a luxury venue which is to be the new home of the Berlin Philharmonic's Easter Festival from next year, the sound is vivid, detailed and with plenty of perspective. The acoustic is neutral, typical of modern venues, and if there is a lack of resonance this is offset by no dryness either. This allows a very realistic sound picture for orchestra and singers alike. The audience appears to be absent, so unobtrusive are they-the clapping after the Italian Tenor's aria is onstage.
I haven't enjoyed Thielemann's Strauss much in the past, especially not his recordings with Fleming, which I found to be stodgy, overblown and glutinous.
Happily, just as the stage production is a glorious and glamorous romp, so is his reading of the work-swift, pointed, affectionately drawn out when required, plenty of portamento employed, charming and witty by turns-just what the authors wanted! He is aided by a lush Munich Philharmonic, who may not have played this work often in its entirety, and this shows in occasional minor imprecision-but nothing of concern.
Sophie Koch's rich, vibrant mezzo is a superb contrast the exquisite floated tones of Diana Damrau's Sophie. Damrau more than demonstrates why she occupies the exalted position held by Popp and Janowitz in their early careers in Mozart and Strauss. Hawlata is a genial Ochs-a comic buffoon, and not a threatening bully or a thug as Rydl portrays him in the disappointing Haitink, a recording I don't much care for. This is a stage performance, with vocal clowning, but plenty of rich full tone in the big moments. His act 2 soliloquy-uncut for a change-is wonderful, and the duet between Ochs and Anina as she reads the letter from "Mariandel" is sublime, helped by the best Anina I can recall. Grundheber's Faninal wobbles vocally but is funny, and this set has one of the best supporting casts of all, with the Duenna, Anina as already mentioned, and Valzacchi of Ablinger-Sperrhacke particularly well portrayed.
The original casting of the Italian Tenor was Rolando Villazon-but as so often these days, he had to withdraw at the last moment. Fortunately Jonas Kaufmann stepped in to save the day. His wonderful assumption recalls the recording made by Richard Tauber (conducted by Korngold), with his baritonal tenor maybe not idiomatic, but just wonderful to hear-a real highlight.
This leaves Fleming's Marschallin, and it is very fine, but perhaps a little too late in her career to catch her at her best in this role. All the rich creaminess of her lower and middle range is superbly caught, but there is just a tad of awkwardness in reaching the higher notes, which are not as pure as they once were. She looks stunning on stage of course, but as a purely audio experience, there are signs of her being in the autumn of her career. Of course, I'm being ultra forensic here, and it's important to say that by any standards this is a great performance, and she acts wonderfully catching all the bitter sweetness of the role. Her act one soliloquy where she muses wistfully on the passing of time is exquisite, and she again takes the breath away in the final scene and famous trio.
So all in all, it's very good and I'm pleased to own it.Stage noise is minimal-I hardly noticed any-and audience applause has been excised.
Of course, there are 3 totally different and equally magnificent recordings to choose from at mid-price-in no order of preference-Solti, Karajan (Vienna) and Bernstein.
All three offer boundless pleasure in their respective ways, and I would say that this one falls just a bit short of that-but rest assured, anyone who loves this work will enjoy this recording, and fans of Fleming need not hesitate-it's unlikely we'll get a better performance of her in this role in first class sound.
What a pity they wasted opportunities recording Daphne and Rusalka before Rosenkavalier. Not quite 5 stars-but a good 4 and a half! Stewart Crowe.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A winning theatrical event, despite the vocal flaws 16 Mar 2013
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
If Decca had carried through with a complete Rosenkavalier to showcase Fleming in 1999, we might have gotten a glowing, brilliant account instead of a single "Strauss Heroines" CD. But its final trio with Susan Graham and Barbara Bonney, who are superlative as Sophie and Octavian, remains a treasure. Unfortunately, it also throws into glaring relief the shortcomings of this complete live performance. Ralph Moore has already applied a fairly kind scalpel to the cast's vocal shortcomings. Koch's Octavian sounds middle-aged, and the luminous Fleming, who turned fifty the year this recording was made, isn't her younger self, even though her middle to upper range is beautifully preserved (in an interview Fleming commented on her good fortune that her vice hasn't darkened with age but actually lightened in some ways, allowing her to undertake a late-career Violetta in La Traviata).

If you can limit your focus to Fleming's complete embodiment of the Marschallin as a character, abetted by Thielemann's strong orchestral work - he deserves his reputation as the leading Strauss opera conductor of the day - this CD version of a filmed DVD contains a great deal of liveliness and thrust. By comparison, quite a few prestigious Rosenkavaliers of the past, where the singing cast is impeccable, feel dramatically inert: Haitink and the remake by Karajan come to mind. Here, you are in the theater watching vital characters caught in vexing comic predicaments. After initial disappointment with the singing in the opening boudoir scene, I perked up once Ochs entered - this is a performance where the public action is better than the intimacy, although Fleming makes a moving personal triumph out of the Marschallin's monologue on time in Act I (to be ranked up there with Reining, Schwarzkopf, and Crespin on recordings).

Unlike Mr. Moore, who notices Franz Hawlata's vocal flaws, I find him an amusing, domineering Ochs, an earthy aristocrat who could care less than he's the bull in anyone's china shop, and he alone brings us the echt Viennese tone that was once synonymous with this opera - on disc, the perfect embodiment of Ochs was a delicious choice between Ludwig Weber for Erich Kleiber and Otto Edelmann for Karajan in the classic, I might say immortal, version on EMI. For decades one couldn't speak of Rosenkavalier without bowing to those two sets, and time hasn't dulled their majesty, even with brave forays from Carlos Kleiber and Solti.

Diana Damrau seems to make a brilliant stage impression wherever she appears, but I've never seen her and can only judge the voice, which she uses dramatically and vivaciously; I greatly admired her CD of Strauss orchestral songs, also under Thielemann. But if examined for purity, evenness, and security of tone, Damrau's lyric soprano can't stand comparison with most of her predecessors. This bothers Mr. Moore considerably, and I see his point, but if you can accept what she is offering, Damrau's Sophie makes a strong impression, very different from the tremulous girl-bride we usually hear. As recorded here, unfortunately, the top notes carry a sting.

I've tried to describe with some objectivity what I hear on these discs, but in reality everyone who loves Der Rosenkavalier relates to it with a tender heart. I'm so grateful for a sincere, ardent performance of this caliber that I can forgive a good deal that others might not. You'll have to judge for yourself if the whole is greater than the sum of its imperfect parts.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Ravishing performance 27 Jan 2013
By David W. Messer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a ravishingly beautiful performance - Renee Fleming has made the Marschallin "her" role, ably abetted by Sophie Koch as Octavian, Diana Damrau as the young Sophie, and of course Franz Hawlata as the Baron, with Christian Thielemann in a superb orchestral and choral leadership role. In my judgment, this is the recording to own.
0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Cracked Jewel Case 14 Mar 2014
By Joan G. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The recording itself is, of course, wonderful, but the jewel case was quite smashed and came apart at the spine. I am having to use a rubber band to keep it all together. Is there any way to get a replacement jewel case?

Joan Gregoryk
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