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Strauss: Eine Alpensinfonie (An Alpine Symphony) Live, Import


Price: £8.11 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Product details

  • Orchestra: Staatskapelle Dresden
  • Conductor: Giuseppe Sinopoli
  • Composer: Richard Strauss
  • Audio CD (1 Oct. 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Live, Import
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B000025WWG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 161,146 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 13 Mar. 2015
Format: Audio CD
Obscurity engulfs all. Somewhat unfairly, it has come early for this 1993 performance of the Alpine Symphony with the Dresden Staatskapelle, conducted by a master Straussian, Guiseppi Sinopli. This great orchestra premiered the work - it still owns it. I have yet to encounter a performance of Opus 64 that is note-perfect. This is no exception: the off-stage horns are errant at times. Nevertheless, it's always a treat to hear this Rolls Royce of an orchestra, particularly when it is being stretched to break-point. What a brass section! Noah would scamper back the Ark if he heard this Storm.

With conviction and passion, Sinopoli forges the 22 vignettes into the one narrative. One certainly undertakes an ascent of this peak and vividly so. Nevertheless, the inevitable comparison with Eine Alpensinfonie (An Alpine Symphony) is not in his favour. His merits notwithstanding, Sinopoli cannot match Karajan's superheated ecstasy or indeed, the latter's mastery of the infinitesimal delay in the flow of things. Evidence: compare the respective treatment of the five big chords in Der Anstieg (Hvk 1'25" GS 1'28"): they're just fillers in the latter whereas Herbie, more attentive to their yield, sends one skywards. Sinopoli's Gefahrvolle Augenblicke is prosaic and the subsequent arrival on the summit and receipt of vision, good as they are, are not as blistering as Herbie's account where one sees into the heart of things. I am tempted to say that Sinopoli almost loses the line in the Storm: it's somewhat shapeless. Perhaps it is fairer to say that he lacks Karajan's grip. Summation is all in both finales.

This was recorded live in the Semperoper.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Take a hike! 29 Jun. 2011
By Sean William Menzies - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I have been up and down this mountain countless times, with countless recordings, and never have I heard such color and magic as in this one. Recorded live on a Palm Sunday, audience noise is nearly inaudible and the playing is thrilling and deeply engrossing. Somehow, the orchestral colors come out so vividly in this recording, due to the glorious engineering and to Sinopoli's ferocious detail, that what you see in your mind are colors - when the first ray of sunlight "pings" over the mountains at dawn, you see it in your mind. Blues and greens undulate as you wander by the brook, the waterfall is dazzling crystals caught in the sun, the flowery fields splash wildflower colors, the sheep and cattle can clearly be seen in the distant valley. And the sunset! It begins in one spot on the horizon, then pushes aside the dark storm clouds and blazes across the mind like a volcano.

I've hiked this mountain many, many times, with many, many conductors, but this is the one recording, with a mirthful Mount Crumpet on the front cover, that surrounds me with the music of Nature. It never bores and it always thrills.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Forgotten Ascent 13 Mar. 2015
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Obscurity engulfs all. Somewhat unfairly, it has come early for this 1993 performance of the Alpine Symphony with the Dresden Staatskapelle, conducted by a master Straussian, Guiseppi Sinopli. This great orchestra premiered the work - it still owns it. I have yet to encounter a performance of Opus 64 that is note-perfect. This is no exception: the off-stage horns are errant at times. Nevertheless, it's always a treat to hear this Rolls Royce of an orchestra, particularly when it is being stretched to break-point. What a brass section! Noah would scamper back the Ark if he heard this Storm.

With conviction and passion, Sinopoli forges the 22 vignettes into the one narrative. One certainly undertakes an ascent of this peak and vividly so. Nevertheless, the inevitable comparison with Eine Alpensinfonie (An Alpine Symphony) is not in his favour. His merits notwithstanding, Sinopoli cannot match Karajan's superheated ecstasy or indeed, the latter's mastery of the infinitesimal delay in the flow of things. Evidence: compare the respective treatment of the five big chords in Der Anstieg (Hvk 1'25" GS 1'28"): they're just fillers in the latter whereas Herbie, more attentive to their yield, sends one skywards. Sinopoli's Gefahrvolle Augenblicke is prosaic and the subsequent arrival on the summit and receipt of vision, good as they are, are not as blistering as Herbie's account where one sees into the heart of things. I am tempted to say that Sinopoli almost loses the line in the Storm: it's somewhat shapeless. Perhaps it is fairer to say that he lacks Karajan's grip. Summation is all in both finales.

This was recorded live in the Semperoper. The 20-bit recording is a more natural sounding affair than Karajan 80 (which ain't hard) but it's not free of constriction. This is most noticeable whenever a cymbal makes an appearance.

Gresham's Law in Reverse states that great recordings drive their lessers into oblivion. It's a bugger.
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