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Strange Cousins from the West
 
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Strange Cousins from the West

14 July 2009 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:15
30
2
4:22
30
3
3:47
30
4
5:58
30
5
4:51
30
6
4:36
30
7
4:10
30
8
5:30
30
9
3:21
30
10
4:08
30
11
3:46
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Product details

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The way to experience Clutch, as you will read constantly, is live (I will duly find out for myself 2nd November). I got into this band early this year and have been on a Clutch collection drive ever since. For those who have heard little of their back catalogue the band can be a little misleading. If you go off recent releases such as the blusey 'From Beale Street To Oblivion' you may find the early albums a bit difficult to access. This is due to the punishing nature of the songwriting (loud, aggressive). However, Clutch albums are typically slow burners and repeated listens are well rewarded. The self titled second album is a classic and most fans are divided between 'Robot Hive/Exodus' and 'Blast Tyrant' as the pinnacle (thus far) of the band's career. However, listened to in isolation, 'Stange Cousins' is an instant classic. I LOVE this album and it stands up against anything in my collection. If you like classic rock, classic riffage, brilliant musicianship (drummer John Paul Gaster and guitarist Tim Sult are incredible) then you will love this. The songwriting is never obvious with Clutch, Neil Fallon's lyrics are intelligent and quirky and you sometimes feel that he is amusing himself and challenging you to notice. This is especially refreshing in this current X-Factor/Pop Idol covers of 'baby, baby' type pop era. Also, who could ignore that huge, voice? Clutch should be legends but for those like me who can still get tickets, still buy the albums and are enjoying the unique, no frills, honest and down to earth approach that Clutch employ, we probably prefer it this way. 'Shot Down' (track 2) has been in my head ever since I first heard it. The Sabbath-esque riff for 'Abraham Lincoln' has to be in the running for riff of the year.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
Clutch may be far from a household name but there cult following in the music scene is growing with each release- and with good reason. Clutch represent good wholesome, ballsy Rock N Roll with a heavy dose of bluesy attitude and stoner groove. This, there ninth album following on from the critically applauded 'From Beale St. To Oblivion', is to a extent business as usual for the band, but boy business is good. While fans may miss the presence of organist Mike Schauer, the infectious (and more than ever) blues tinged guitar and drumming coupled with Neil Fallon's commanding vocal work and surreal lyrics should keep the ears happy.While not as exciting as past efforts, 'Strange Cousins From The West' is a strong addition to a back catalogue that is growing in strength and musical maturity with each release. Sit back, grab a beer and Enjoy.
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Format: Audio CD
You always know where you stand with Clutch. For years, the Germantown quin/quartet have been peddling straight, no chaser riffs coupled with preaching-from-the-pulpit guttural roars, and they've become something of an underground phenomenon. Not quite stoner rock nor 70's throwbacks, Clutch have remained true to the groove since forming in 1990. This, their ninth album, continues the bands current fascination with all things blues, something they explored with some depth on their previous album (the magnificent `From Beale St to Oblivion').

Being a huge fan of the group, and having followed their output from their self-titled sophomore album all the way to 2007's `...Beale St', I greet any new Clutch material as reverentially as if it were the second coming (I imagine Neil Fallon would be delighted with that imagery). So when the album arrived (three days before the official release, thank you very much Amazon), I took my time taking it apart, admiring the artwork, scanning Fallon's atypical `so bizarre this man's either a genius or a madman' lyrics and staring lovingly at my new shiny gold disc. Too much? Yes, it probably was. The artwork and lyrics impressed, but it wouldn't be worth a damn if the music inside didn't hit the proverbial spot. So...the album.

The first thing that hits, as `Motherless Child' lumbers into view, is how, well...flat it all sounds. Sure, the groove was there, and `...Child', `Struck Down' and '50,000 Unstoppable Watts' move along at a decent pace, but there was nothing that sank in, nothing that had the bite of `Blast Tyrant' or the inherent whisky-soaked catchiness of `...Beale St'. Clutch sounded a little bored, like they'd discovered the blues and hadn't liked what they'd found.
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Format: Audio CD
A few months ago I was introduced to Clutch by my youngest son who had purchased the "Exodus" album and expressed his appreciation to the extent where he allowed me to "borrow" it and "see what you think"! Much to my undoubted disgrace the album has never been returned.
I have just spent the distance travelling from said sons home in Kircudbrightshire back to my own home, a distance of some 111 miles, listening to the latest addition to my collection, the above advertised newy from the superb "Clutch".
Poncey phrases as "eclectic" and "strangely different" may be issued from some quarters, but most certainly not from here. Make no mistake this band are different but in no sense strange. They need your attention and very soon to make them huge.
The wonderful change from the normal verse, chorus, verse, chorus middle eight, repeat to fade is gladly nowhere in evidence. I hate to make comparisons and having just said that, as is obvious here comes the comparison, the only other band that make or should I say made music anything like this were a band I heard many decades ago who went by the name of "Max Webster". Wonderfully different from anything that you may have heard before. The blending of the lyrics into the time signatures definitely requires a brain or brains operating on a level way outside the norm.
If you are tiring from the above mentioned "norm" give your auditory sytem a shock and introduce it to quality that will change your view? and hopefully put a huge grin on your face and a little giggle in your heart knowing that music is alive and in the best of rude health with the band called Clutch
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