Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: 3.11

or
 
   
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Straight Into Darkness [Hardcover]

Faye Kellerman
3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Hardcover, Aug 2004 --  
Paperback --  
Audio, CD --  

Book Description

Aug 2004
In 1920s Munich, homicide detective Axel Berg is called to the scene of a grisly murder, the victim being a young and pretty society wife. Soon, a second body is uncovered; the discovery of a third indicates that Berg is dealing with a killer who has no fear being caught. In the Germany of the time, no investigation on this scale can be straightforward. Adolph Hitler's power is growing, and the Nazis are a strong civic force in the city of Munich. Berg has always considered himself apolitical, and as an outsider living a routine life he's been of no interest to those with power. But this high-profile case changes all that, as senior officers work to their own agendas, while one theory is that the killings themselves are part of a fascist conspiracy. Berg is alone as never before, with the imminent threat at all times of making a mistake with deadly consequences.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Warner Books; First Edition edition (Aug 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446530409
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446530408
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.5 x 3.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,259,274 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in St. Louis, Faye Kellerman is one of the most highly considered US crime authors. Her first novel, 'The Ritual Bath' (1986) introduced Sergeant Peter Decker and Rina Lazarus. It also won the 1987 Macavity Award for Best First Mystery. Kellerman currently lives in Beverly Hills with her husband and four children.

Product Description

Review

'Kellerman is strong on plot and Berg is an interesting protagonist... She weaves the search for the serial killer into the bigger story with aplomb' (Observer) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Faye Kellerman's powerful new novel brilliantly evokes the dangerous world of 1920s Munich, where a series of brutal murders brings a talented detective into dangerous confrontation with the increasingly powerful National Socialists --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing 2 Jun 2006
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The characters don't really grab your attention or feel credible, the investigation of the murder proceeds eratically and terribly slowly, for no good reason - after eye-witness statements regarding the prime suspect's description and name/pseudonym, one detective is despatched to look through some records, while Berg, the main detective, meanders about on other matters! And he has absolutely no reaction - then or later - when he comes across the murdered body of his mistress, minutes after having killed to protect her! The whole book lacks believability.

Everyone acts like movie-Nazis (especially the bad ones who foam about jews), and everyone speaks in stilted and clunky WWII movie-German :

"May I ask why you're half-naked?"

"I am not naked - neither half nor whole"

"But neither are you in clothing";

- Berg, when asked if he wants something to eat : "Yes, that would be satisfying"...and so on.

There is no set pattern to the use of German words or terms in the book : most are italicised, as per normal practice, but then others are not, e.g. instead of communist and communism, the author uses Kommunist and Kommunism, both unitalicised - why?

For a period-set book I do like to feel the author knows the period, but you can overdo it...

Here there is an irritating overuse of irrelevant details, as if to show off the author's research : Berg's wife doesn't just hold a can of coffee - it's a 'red can of Onko coffee from bremen'; she doesn't just take a cigarette, oh no, it's ' a cigarette from a red-and-white Schimmelpennick tin'... in fact I think we get the brandname and packaging colours for three or four cigarette brands in the book. It's all unnecessary and overdone.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing 12 Aug 2005
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The characters don't really grab your attention or feel credible, the investigation of the murder proceeds erratically and terribly slowly, for no good reason - after eye-witness statements regarding the prime suspect's description and name/pseudonym, one detective is despatched to look through some records, while Berg,the main detective, meanders about on other matters! And he has absolutely no real reaction - then or later -when he comes across the murdered body of his mistress, minutes after having killed to protect her! The whole book lacks believability.
Everyone acts like movie-Nazis (especially the bad ones who foam about the Jews), and everyone speaks in stilted and clunky WWII movie-German -
'May I ask why you're half-naked?'
'I am not naked - neither half nor whole.'
' But neither are you in clothing.'
- Berg, when asked if he wants something to eat : 'Yes, that would be satisfying.' etc., etc.
There is no set pattern as to the use of German words or terms in the book : most words are italicised, as per normal practice, but then others are not, e.g. instead of communist and communism, the author uses Kommunist and Kommunismus, both unitalicised - why?
For a period-set book, I do like to feel the author knows the period, but you can overdo it...Here there is an irritating overuse of irrelevant detail, as if to show off the author's research : Berg's wife doesn't just hold a can of coffee - it's 'a red can of Onko Kaffee from Bremen'; she doesn't just take a cigarette, oh no, it's 'a cigarette from a red-and-white Schimmelpennick tin' - in fact I think we get the brandname and packaging colours for three or four cigarette brands in the book. It's all unnecessary and overdone.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kellerman's Best 13 Mar 2006
Format:Paperback
Germany between the wars has recently provided fertile ground for some outstanding thrillers. Hot on the heels of Jeffrey Deaver's excellent "Garden of Beasts" we have Faye Kellerman's riveting "Straight Into Darkness."
I have read most of her Pete Decker novels, and all of husband Jonathan's Alex Delaware works, and, as good as they are, I can say without hesitation that "Straight Into Darkness" is the best and most memorable work penned by either Kellerman. While Deaver set his work in Berlin at around the time of the 1936 Olympics, Kellerman takes us back to Munich, in 1929.
While the book is a murder mystery on one level, it is a great deal more than that. Here we are taken back to a time when the Nazis are not yet in power, but are beginning to make their presence felt in no uncertain terms. This is the time that Hitler and his cohorts are just beginning to captivate the German nation. It paints a frightening and doubtless realistic picture of a nation about to descend into absolute madness.
As a case study of what took Germany down the ultimately self-destructive path of National Socialism, this book provides as good an overview as any dusty historical tome - and it is a great deal more readable, too. This cannot have been an easy book for a Jewish woman to pen, but Kellerman manages not to get preachy or sentimental about those objects of the Nazis' wrath (Jews, Communists, gypsies, etc.) whose worst nightmare has not even really begun at this time. Nor does she fall into the trap of being a little too clever, because she knows a great many things that the book's characters cannot yet know.
It's a great, memorable, and thought-provoking read. If I could give it a sixth star, I would without hestitation.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback