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Straight from the Fridge Dad Hardcover – Oct 2000


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: No Exit Press (Oct. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1842430009
  • ISBN-13: 978-1842430002
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 11.2 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 387,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Max Décharné was born in England, and can still speak English when his business demands it.

During the past fifteen years he has flung various books and records at the public, and travelled to a variety of countries - firstly as a member of Gallon Drunk, then since 1995 as the singer with The Flaming Stars - spreading peace, goodwill and partial deafness among the youth of the world. He divides his drinking time between London and Berlin.

Product Description

From the Publisher

Straight From The Fridge Dad lays down the righteous jive
Much of the slang popularly associated with the hippie generation of the sixties actually dates back before WW2, hijacked in the main from jazz and blues street expressions, mostly relating to drugs, sex and drinking. Why talk when you can beat your chops, why eat when you can line your flue and why snore when you can call some hogs? You're not drunk - you're just plumb full of stagger-juice and your skin isn't pasty, it's just cafe sunburn. Need a black coffee? That's a shot of java, nix on the moo juice. Containing thousands of examples of hipster slang drawn from pulp novels, classic noir and exploitation films, blues, country and rock'n'roll lyrics and other related sources from the 1920s to the 1960's, Straight From The Fridge Dad lays down the righteous jive, perfect for all you hipsters, B-girls, weedheads, moochers, shroud-tailors, bandrats, top studs, gassers, snowbirds, trigger-men, grifters and long gone daddies.

"Good sacktime eye-candy" - Time Out

"Bopologist Max D gives the good gab on how to speak that hep hipster slang" - Mojo

"9/10" - Loaded

"Shoots the work to fascinating and hilarious effect" - Esquire "Perfect for whiling away an afternoon working on that indoor café sunburn" - I.D.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By red_monkey VINE VOICE on 12 Sept. 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Unhook your ears, Jack. This aint no sucker bait. This hot little book is real gone, totally sent. I mean this book fractured me, I was paralysed man! If any of you long-gone daddies out there wanna impress the hot little mouse in your life then this is the bible for you. I used to be just a palooka in a bluesey groove. But since I've read this book I'm a jitterbuggin' hepcat with a whoopee mama on each arm! So get off the fence, Hortense. Buy this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ms Joanne Ashmore on 13 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
I bought this for my best friend and fully expect some groovy slang to be slipped into conversations from now on!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Jan. 2002
Format: Paperback
So cool it's cold, as the title would suggest. I got this book as a stocking filler and couldn't put it down, although most of the hipster slang is gangster speak and of varying degrees of vulgarity, it is side splittingly funny.
Trying to picture people actually holding a conversation talking like this is probably the best thing about it.
I've given it three stars because it's not really a book that you'd read again and again, but well worth a look.
Buy this book or six of your friends will be carrying you by the handles, Jack.
Plant you now
Dig you later
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Anthony J. Hume on 7 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
this is a great little book. clever, witty and informative.
i got it for my dad who is 78 and he's now talking in a strange bygone vernacular that no one understands except the young hoods on the corner of the street.
get it and book your place in cool-dom
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Groovy 9 April 2002
By Keja L. Beeson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is such a fun book. The best part are the footnotes. They explain where the terms originate from (movies, novels...)I got Straight from the Fridge, because I wanted to look up "normal" words and find what the slang might be so I could jazz up the speech in a short story. However, the book is not set up that way. It is organized in alphabetical order for the slang term only. Despite this drawback, it is a great source and well worth the read.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Straight from the Fridge . . .Hipster Slang 7 Oct. 2009
By MD - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is available in both paperback and hard cover. My paperback is 190 pages. The primary advantage of this book over more formal (and better documented) slang dictionaries is that this publication includes slang phrases - "togged to the bricks", for example - that are bypassed by simple listings of slang words.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
great book with a major problem 11 Mar. 2010
By Qfroman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a great reference for writers looking for great dialogue, it has a ton of obscure and well known phrases with, in some cases, references to where the phrase got popularized.

I did however find one big problem with the book. When I get a book for reference, no matter the subject, I never peruse the pages for what I need; I go to the index. This book does not have an index. Reference book fail. Also, to make using it as a reference book even worse, it organizes the words by the slang not by the word the slang replaces There are a lot of words for alcohol, but instead of finding them in one place, I have to search through the book.

Another little thing that bugged me was that the book talked about gathering slang from most of the first half of the 20th century but does not put dates of use for most of its content.

So I like it, but if another book comes along that makes the reference process easier, I'll be going with that one.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Stand by while I pad your skull 31 Aug. 2008
By J. Plummer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is a "reference" guide for slang phrases used in jazz, rockabilly music, and pulp fiction/noir until about the early sixties. The phrases/terms used in the aforementioned mediums are displayed in alphabetical order, but this guide does not offer a reverse look-up; for instance, "bottle baby" means drunk but you can't look up drunk and find all the phrases/words in this book that mean drunk (and there are ALOT of phrases/words that mean drunk.) So for a reference guide, it sucks.
Also, I would've enjoyed more of an explanation on the origins of the terms/phrases. He often references where he found the terms, but he doesn't tell you their historical or generational siginificance (although some are obvious.)
Plus, this book would've gotten definite thumbs up if there were pics, but sadly, not one pic.
All in all, it's a pretty unique and interesting book to pick up.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
What's Hip Today Might Become Passe 1 Jun. 2006
By M. Allen Greenbaum - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Subtitled "A Dictionary of Hipster Slang," this is a broad overview of mostly noirish/beat slang that will be enjoyed mostly be devotees of those genres. As mentioned by another reviewer, the organization is alphabetical only (as opposed to thematic, chronological, or source), so this lacks efficiency as a resource book--it's better for browsing. On the other hand, the somewhat narrower focus makes this more a heck of a lot more fun than the big and dry "Dictionary of Modern Slang," which is more complete but, akin to reading a dictionary. The slang expression is in a greyed margin on the left; brief explanations and examples are to the right.

The book has flaws: The etymology of the slang is sparing; there are some examples of works in which it was used (but we don't know if that was the first use) for some but not all of the words. Most disappointing? Not a single picture except the book cover. To some extent, that may limit its "gift appeal," and, more importantly, and presents the words without much context. Perhaps copyright issues were at play; still, even scene-setting period photos would have evoked the slang's cultural and historical referents. There's also no index, although that's somewhat expected given the paltry organization. Given all this, the book (at around $15.00) is currently overpriced. Still, since there aren't many competitors, it has merit as browsing material (especially), and somewhat as a reference for "hipster" language.
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