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Story of the Eye Paperback – 1 Jan 1979


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Paperback, 1 Jan 1979
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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 127 pages
  • Publisher: Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd; Reprinted edition edition (1 Jan 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0714526274
  • ISBN-13: 978-0714526270
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 13.5 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,073,918 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Dovid Bergelson, one of the most renowned and influential writers of the 1900s, was born in Ocrimovo, Ukraine, in 1884. In 1952, at the age of 68, after four years of prison, he died a victim of Stalin's police. His work as a writer and literary man spans a period of approximately thirty years.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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First Sentence
I grew up very much alone, and as far back as I recall I was frightened of anything sexual. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "nicedream5398" on 9 Jan 2006
Format: Paperback
Story of the Eye is not so much an erotic text, as an exploration on what it is that drives every human- desire. Desire to live, breath eat, make love, our lives revolve around it, and if there was no desire we would not be alive.It is a mistake to have Batailles novella down as an erotic fiction- it is so much more than that. He exorcises his demons through eroticism at its highest level, in order to find a release, or death, of that wanting, which can never be resolved. It is an important read, and whatever it is you take away from it, it will be something important.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Mar 1998
Format: Paperback
"The Story of the Eye" is the finest book ever written about the idea that one can take pleasure from acts like sitting down in a puddle of milk, placing a plucked eyeball in one's most intimate anatomical area, and inserting a hard-boiled egg into one's rectum. Experimental, arrogant, and sexually insatiable, the novel's two young lovers embark on a carnal odyssey (involving, among other things, suicide and some blasphemous debauchery in a confessional) that is, simply put, not for the faint of heart.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Feb 2006
Format: Paperback
Bataille's novel is a book about which one can argue endlessly whether it is pornographic or art or both. This is the point. It is easy to see how one can dismiss the novel as smut. However, in order to really understand the metaphorical language and the connection of themes within the novel one must dwell in Sontag's and Barthes' essays (incorporated within the book) that may change one's perspective about the graphic but beautifully written content of the book. In fact, the essays form an integral piece to understand contemporary French writing. To push it to the extreme, talking about it is philosophising.
The story of the eye offers to both camps: those that want to have a quick mesmerising read and those who are interested in understanding a modern continental perspective on a philosophy of art.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 July 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you're thinking plot and characterization, you're missing the point. This is modernism all the way: vignettes with their own individual logic which do thread together, but not in the way of an epic which builds and smooths out contradictions. It works perfectly as an erotic text because it illuminates the way desire catches on the tiniest of details, magnifying each beyond the reach of rational discourse. It moves skilfully, evading the capture of novelistic conventions, denying a too easy satisfaction. It's precisely these qualities which make it great erotic writing; it allows the reader to engage their own desires in the gaps which a lesser novel would be tempted to fill in. It's not there to be understood, it's to be revelled in!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Mar 1998
Format: Paperback
one of the best books...entirely weird....maximum surrealism...i've read this 3 times and have forced it upon many friends....a wonderful dream...my first awakening into the fiercly extreme.....made me WANT to go insane....you know there were never any bounds........
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Jun 1999
Format: Paperback
"Story of the Eye" is a visit to the extremes of Bataille's consciousness; blessed are those who return intact from this horrific journey. More 'real life' than Sade, this is an excellent example for Shattuck's formulation of "forbidden knowledge". A must for connoisseurs of pornographic literature.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Mar 1998
Format: Paperback
This tale travels in lurid sketches detailing the experiences & experiments of 3 people who lived up at their own & got away with it.Their obsessions & fantasies executed in highly mysterious & near supernatural imagery leave a detachingly cold atmosphere in short & cluttered sentences occassionally highlighted by bits of lyricism.Their sinister perversions & mania for the gravel of sexual satisfaction & eventual accomplishment of this stretches the boundaries of subcultural degeneracy a bit furhther.The characters analogousness in each undertaking exemplify mankind fulfilling the natural dictates of what I would call the "Basic Fixative Essence" of things.Simone's fascination for the things she satisfies herself on is a perfect illustration of man rediscovering the core of his basest desires.Fetishisms arise in ecstatic motions in this slightly revolutionary novelette,including the famous augmentation of the sex impulse through the rending sights & scents of nature.The piece powerfully ends in a revealing sadness surprising for it's romantic symbolitry imprinted by an unforgettable vision of sight.These works of art are best appreciated when one has no preconceived notions;when one can enter it's world & LIVE IN IT rather than merely browsing through.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Helen on 21 April 2011
Format: Paperback
I did not get it. Bored me to death.

I know it has an intellectual commentary by Susan Sontag, et al. And is published by Penguin classics. But I just did not get it.

If this had been handed to me in plain wraps I would have thought the author a thirteen-year-old boy; it has that isn't sex shocking mentality. Perhaps it was enough to excite back in the day when piano legs needed covers. I can only imagine this being of interest to students of English Literature.
Yeah, I know. I've read all the other reviews and the commentaries, and now understand what the author was trying to do, but its still pretty awful.

I admit it was haunting and dream like in places. Thinking about it: that's what it reminds me of, a night of fever induced delirium.

But it moved me about as much as listening to old Edwardian songs. "Come Into the Garden Maud" certainly won't get me into the Moshpit.

Enough said.
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