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Stormrider: (The Rigante Book 4) Paperback – 1 Apr 2003


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Frequently Bought Together

Stormrider: (The Rigante Book 4) + Ravenheart: A Novel Of The Rigante: (The Rigante Book 3) + Midnight Falcon: (The Rigante Book 2)
Price For All Three: £20.37

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Product details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi; New Ed edition (1 April 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552146765
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552146760
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 3 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 36,749 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Published in 1984, David A. Gemmell's first novel, Legend, has become a classic. His most recent Drenai and Rigante books are all published as Bantam Press hardcovers and Corgi paperbacks. All of his novels are Sunday Times bestsellers. Now widely regarded as one of the finest writers of heroic fantasy, David Gemmell lived in East Sussex until his death in July 2006.

Product Description

Amazon Review

In Stormrider David Gemmell yet again demonstrates the passion for storytelling and the heroic which makes his best books so very much better than his sometimes clunky individual sentences might indicate.

Driven back to the barren hills of their homeland, the Rigante clansmen whose ancient ways have dominated Gemmell's series named for them are the natural world's last resource against crusaders, whose corrupt magic would destroy everything. Yet the crucial hero of the struggle is not the Rigante chieftain Kaelin, but Gaise, the dashing cavalryman son of the Rigante's worst enemy, the Moidart.

Gemmell is fascinated by what makes good men do evil--Gaise becomes hideously ruthless in his pursuit of a righteous war--and also by what makes evil men do good; faced with an ultimate evil that regards him as a personal enemy, the Moidart is forced not only onto the side of Good, but also to an understanding of what he really wants.

Gemmell is fond of the brutal and of the sentimental, but there is an underlying integrity to his work that comes from a real belief in the importance of what he is saying; his work is sometimes ponderous and pretentious, but never trivial. --Roz Kaveney --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

'Probably the finest living writer of heroic fantasy' -- Time Out

‘Gemmell is a fireside mythmonger; his characters and plots have the authentic feel of legends handed down through the ages’ -- SFX

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Mar 2002
Format: Hardcover
'Stormrider' offers the familliar feast of epic Gemmell fantasy. The usual themes are given treatment- advancing age, the redeeming power of love, can evil be fought with evil etc. But what makes Stormrider unusual for me is that there is a subtle attempt to link David's various worlds via a theory which sets the Seidhe up as a sort of primogenitor race overseeing all possible worlds, of which the Rigante world is the jewel in the crown.
If you're a fan of David's writing then further analysis is unecessary. If you're a naysayer, then this book will offer no new element to change your opinion of the grand old man of english fantasy.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By C. Woodhead on 5 April 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Stormrider is David Gemmell's sequal to Ravenheart continuing his "Rigante" series. While you don't need to be a Gemmell fan to enjoy this book it makes sense to read at least "Ravenheart" first.
Set in the days of pistols and muskets fans of TV series Sharpe will recognise the change in the pitch of battle compared to Gemmell's previous hack and slash battles.
The book revives a darker side to Gemmels heroes who while being men of principle and honour are capable of darker deeds than the blackest villain.
While the last book focused on Kaelin Ring and his indominatble uncle Jaim Grymach this story focuses on the Storm rider Gaise Macon, son of the evil Moidart. Gemmell twists and turns his charecters with rare skill making the evil Moidart a hero and the Valiant Gaise an atrocious killer.
Stormrider while typical Gemmel fare is an amazingly well thought out and thought provoking book, the points he makes on good and evil, on heroes and cowards are intuitive and inspiring.
A brilliant book and a brilliant read, I picked this up and didn't stop reading it until I was finished.
Awesome
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Jun 2003
Format: Paperback
David Gemmell's final installment of the Rigante series is excellent. It picks up where Ravenheart left off and weaves a breath-taking epic around the previous set scenes.
If you have read the previous books you have to read this one. It answers many questions and completes so much of the story. As always in this type of novel, justice is mostly satisfied.
It is also clear that Gemmell intends the book to stand on it's own and there are cleverly woven histories to help a new reader up to speed. I think this is perhaps the only weakness in the novel as it can be frustrating for someone who has read the previous books but not detailed enough to allow for no prior knowledge.
Overall, read this book - you won't be able to put it down.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AM Hunt on 3 Jun 2004
Format: Paperback
Stormrider the final book in the Rigante series carries on from Ravenheart. At first I was not sure with the complete change in characters, but you soon warm to them and they make more than adequate substitutions. The plot (which spans over two books so I would advise to at least to have read Ravenheart)is well constructed and will keep you guessing to the end. The only fault is that this book seems to be very similar to most of Gemmels other books, and it sometimes feels like you are getting the same characters set on different sets and put in slightly different situations. All in all it is a brilliant book and I strongly recomend it.
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Format: Paperback
An interesting quality of David Gemmell's work is the addictive quality it has. As I've probably mentioned at some point, I once read all 11 of his Drenai novels in a row, and after finishing I'd quite happily have started all over again. There's just something about his novels that inspire genuine involvement on behalf of the reader, and it's easy to become addicted to his unique brand of storytelling. So after finishing Ravenheart, I figured I'd just jump straight into the final novel in the Rigante quartet - Stormrider.

The novel picks up the story some four years after the events of Ravenheart. The prospect of civil war between the King's forces and the Covenanters (only briefly alluded to towards the end of the previous novel) has now exploded into a grim, brutal reality. As it becomes ever more apparent that the ruthless Winter Kay and his zealous Knights of the Sacrifice are bending the course of the war to their own sinister ends, the Rigante and the Moidart - two sworn enemies - find themselves allied to a common cause.

At the centre of this bloodbath are Gaise Macon, the Moidart's son, and Kaelin Ring, now a respected member of the Rigante. Both are heroes in their own right and share a common ancestor, yet they are enemies and struggle to fight alongside each other. And as the war reaches its height, one of them is forced to make a terrible sacrifice to ensure the birth of a new world...

As with all of Gemmell's work, Stormrider is driven by its characters. Some old faces re-appear, alongside one or two new ones. Gemmell was always fascinated by the idea of redemption and the darkness that lurks in men's souls, and this is reflected in the character of Gaise Macon.
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Format: Paperback
This book follows "Ravenheart" detailing the trials of the Rigante and their surrounding lands.

The continent is in turmoil as the civil war pits the King against the covenanters. However a more sinister force is behind the proceeding whose aims are furthered by the continuation of the conflict.

The war gives a real gritty edge to the entire book. There is less of the magic and fairy tale about this story. War is a terrible event as both sides strain to gain advantage, people are killed and atrocities are committed. The battles scenes are well described and the dark side of war is explored here.

Gaise Macon the "Stormrider" is a general in the king's army. As he fights the enemy he also battles his inner demons which arise from his relationship with his father, the evil Moidart, to keep himself becoming like his evil parent.

Gaise's companion, Mulgrave, can barely stand to watch as the young boy he knew slowly turns into a ruthless general who will do whatever it takes to win the war. Can Gaise keep himself a good man, or will he lose himself to inner demons?

He is a very interesting character, much darker than other protagonists in the series have been. However, his father the Moidart has some of the best scenes in the book, one minute he seems to soften, then he ruthlessly cuts down his enemies. The attempted assassination scene is beautifully handled by the character.

The father son relationship is intriguing, as both outwardly renounce any further feelings for the other family member.

Kaelin ring, one of the main characters from the last book, does not play as big a part, which is slightly confusing as he was such a central character in Ravenheart.
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