The Storm (Penguin Classics) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: 2.80

or
 
   
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading The Storm (Penguin Classics) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Storm (Penguin Classics) [Hardcover]

Daniel Defoe , Richard Hamblyn
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 4.68  
Hardcover --  
Paperback 9.06  
Unknown Binding --  

Book Description

27 Nov 2003 Penguin Classics
On the evening of 26th November 1703, a cyclone from the north Atlantic hammered into southern Britain at over seventy miles an hour, claiming the lives of over 8,000 people. Eyewitnesses reported seeing cows left stranded in the branches of trees and windmills ablaze from the friction of their whirling sails. For Defoe, bankrupt and just released from prison for seditious writings, the storm struck during one of his bleakest moments. But it also furnished him with the material for his first book, and in his powerful depiction of private suffering and individual survival played out against a backdrop of public calamity we can trace the outlines of his later masterpieces such as A Journal of the Plague Year and Robinson Crusoe.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd (27 Nov 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0713997265
  • ISBN-13: 978-0713997262
  • Product Dimensions: 19.8 x 13.8 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 993,773 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'A fascinating book chronicling the aftermath of the Great Storm of 1703' -- Michael Fish

From the Inside Flap

'Horror and Confusion seiz'd upon all, whether on Shore or at Sea: No Pen can describe it, no Tongue can express it, no Thought conceive it'

On the evening of 26 November 1703, a cyclone from the north Atlantic hammered into Britain at over seventy miles an hour. Eyewitnesses reported seeing cows left stranded in the branches of trees and windmills ablaze from the friction of their whirling sails - and some 8,000 people lost their lives. For Defoe, just released from prison for his 'seditious' writings, bankrupt and desperate, the storm struck during one of his bleakest moments. But it also furnished him with the material for this, his first book. In his powerful depiction of private suffering and survival played out against a backdrop of natural devastation and public calamity, we can trace the outlines of his later masterpieces A Journal of the Plague Year and Robinson Crusoe.

The Storm has been out of print for nearly a century, and this major new edition marks the 300th anniversary of what is still the worst storm in British history. This edition also includes two other pieces inspired by the events of that momentous night and written by Defoe during the same period: 'The Layman's Sermon Upon the Late Storm', and the poem 'The Storm: An Essay'.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Though a System of Exhalation, Dilation, and Extension, things which the Ancients founded the Doctrine of Winds upon, be not my direct Business; yet it cannot but be needful to the present Design to Note, that the Difference in the Opinions of the Ancients, about the Nature and Original of Winds, is a Leading Step to one Assertion which I have advanc'd in all that I have said with Relation to Winds, viz. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Re-living the Great Storm 5 Dec 2003
Format:Hardcover
This carefully edited re-issue of Daniel Defoe's little known book 'The Storm' makes available a volume which, unaccountably, has been out-of-print for almost a century. Not even the 'Great Storm' of October 1987 - often described as 'the worst since the Great Storm of 1703' - was sufficient to stir the publishing houses from their torpor. Penguin and their editor Richard Hamblyn are now to be congratulated on seizing the opportunity of the 300th anniversary of the event to publish the book in a most attractive format.
Newly-released from prison when the Great Storm struck on the night of 26/27 November, Defoe, ever on the look-out to keep his creditors at bay, hit upon the entirely new idea of appealing, via the newspapers, for eye-witness accounts of the event. The result is a remarkable collection of first-hand accounts from across southern Britain.
Defoe began his work with a study of the 'Natural Causes and Original of Winds', a fascinating introduction to what was the current state of meteorological knowledge at the beginning of the eighteenth century. He also supplies readings of atmospheric pressure which, as Hamblyn points out, have enabled modern climate historians to re-construct the event.
The most absorbing part of the book, however, is the eye-witness accounts themselves variously describing the damage inflicted upon houses, churches, windmills, woods and ships at sea. Many of these speak to us with a powerful directness enabling us to appreciate the terrors of God-fearing people and immersing us in the realities of that Storm-struck society. Not all of the stories are of tragedy.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Obscured by fiction 5 May 2006
Format:Paperback
Until now, Defoe's The Storm hasn't been in print as a single volume since the mid 19th century, the reason being that since the mid 19th century the public has preferred to see Defoe as a fictionist like Dickens, which has degraded the meaning and value of his Journal of the Plague Year and consigned The Storm to oblivion. These works form a pair, both being about national disasters of historic significance. The difference in style is that The Storm consists of Defoe's own observations and research, gathered together with eyewitness accounts from around the nation which he advertised for, while A Journal of the Plague Year has the eyewitness account and Defoe's research blended together into one common narrative. No other journalist has ever done that I think. But if you read the Plague Year as fiction it would be like trying to read The Storm as fiction.

Weather experts have always commented favourably on The Storm and it is legendary. Like the Plague Year, this book is great to read through and browse in afterwards as well - it is not a book to dispence with afterwards. Penguin has retained the dynamics of Defoe's original punctuation, but I wish that the print was bigger and blacker and more comfortable to read.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enthralling 1 Nov 2007
By kehs TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
I found this to be most enthralling. It's full of info about Defoe and his life, and filled with eyewitness accounts of the most terrible storm to hit Britain. The storm arrived in 1703, houses were destroyed, thousands died and fires broke out all over. The eye- witness accounts make for fascinating reading. Defoe advertised for these accounts in a newspaper and people came forward to tell of their experience of the storm. Defoe used these tellings to write The Storm - his first full-length book. I found it amazing to think that one of our most revered writers was bankrupt and had served time in prison. If only he could have known how famous he was to become and how well loved his books would be.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars just to add to what everyone else has said- 29 Sep 2005
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is an amazing book about an amazing event. To people in the early 18th Century, the Storm described by Defoe was the third part of a trinity of disasters: the Plague, the Great Fire, then the Storm.
The Storm itself was comparible to something like Hurricane Hugo, rather than the big wind of 1987. Meteorologists think that Defoe's Storm was a Carribean Hurricane which-unusually- swept westward, striking Northern Europe rather than the Americas.
Some historians are suspicious of Defoe's collection of first-hand testimonies. My advice is, see for yourself. This is a good read.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful writing style. 3 April 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Fascinating description of weather used as an example in many more books and plays.
Great writing style and use of vocabulary.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magnificent Defoe. 29 Dec 2012
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating history and a credit to Daniel Defoe.Every school child should read it.I will enjoy rereading it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars Olde English 5 Feb 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The book is written in difficult to read/understand language, but is a topic of interest and well worth persevering. It was a birthday present for an avid reader who will enjoy it nonetheless
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback