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Storm Over Mont Blanc [DVD] [1930] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]


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Region 1 encoding. (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.

Frequently Bought Together

Storm Over Mont Blanc [DVD] [1930] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] + S.O.S. Iceberg [DVD] [1933] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] + The Blue Light (1932) DVD Region all Region 1,2,3,4,5,6...Compatable starring Leni Riefenstahl,Mathias Wieman...
Price For All Three: £34.62

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Product details

  • Actors: Leni Riefenstahl, Sepp Rist, Ernst Udet, Mathias Wieman, Friedrich Kayßler
  • Directors: Arnold Fanck
  • Writers: Arnold Fanck, Carl Mayer
  • Producers: Gabriel Levy, Harry R. Sokal
  • Format: Black & White, DVD-Video, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: German
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Kino Video
  • DVD Release Date: 8 Nov 2005
  • Run Time: 93 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000B837WY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 149,487 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 12 May 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Arnold Fanck's once hugely popular `berg' (mountain) films have suffered a lot of historical revisionism because of the later Nazi associations of many of those involved - not only Leni Riefenstahl and future Luftwaffe bigwig Ernst Udet but even Fanck himself, although he may only have joined the Party to be allowed to continue making films. While the films themselves had an obvious appeal to some of the strength through health and mythical attitudes of the Nazi party with their emphasis on the physical in their epic tales of man versus nature, there's no political content, just old-fashioned melodrama set against an epic stage: location pictures in every sense of the word where what people do is more important than what they stand for. You get the feeling that he was more like King Kong's Carl Denham, constantly testing himself on dangerous locations only to be nagged into adding romantic interest for the sake of the box-office. 1930's Storm Over Mont Blanc, his first talkie, is a perfect example.

There's not much in the way of plot en route to its memorable finale, but it moves a lot faster than Fanck's more famous mountain rescue epic The White Hell of Pitz Palu, throwing in a playful ski chase and a flight to the mountaintop weather station that allows Riefenstahl to meet cute with Sepp Rist's weather man she knows only from his Morse code reports. Their growing romance is briefly postponed after an accident on the mountain and further thwarted by a less than convincing bit of plotting that sees his musician friend she nurses back to health down below fall in love with her.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bernie VINE VOICE on 11 Oct 2008
Format: DVD
Sturme uber dem Mont Blanc

Hella Armstrong (Leni Riefenstahl) is introduced to a rugged recluse meteorologist, Hannes (Sepp Rist), who lives alone at the top of a mountain. Both Hannes and his friend, pilot Ernst Udet (as himself), are vying for Hella. Hannes who thinks he has lost, unknown to Hella, forgoes his vacation form the cabin to find his self caught in a storm without gloves. And things are about to get worse. Will Hella find out in time to save him? Is Ernst still his friend and be able to fly to his aid? Or will this end with a Hannes-cicle?

At first I though that this film was not too sophisticated even for the time with its stilted dialog and frivolous story. Later the film the story started to come together to be more intriguing. And when the storm struck it became down right fascinating.

The stars of the film are the mountains and the clouds (shot in elapse time.) This is one of the earliest of the series of German Mountain Movies. While Leni Riefenstahl was acting in this film she learned the fundamentals of filming techniques that she expanded on in the films that she directed.

The version I watched has the option of English subtitles which helped when Leni mumbled. However once in a while you could hear the words and the subtitles were a very lose paraphrase.

The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Historic film with innovative filming techniques 11 Oct 2008
By bernie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Sturme uber dem Mont Blanc

Hella Armstrong (Leni Riefenstahl) is introduced to a rugged recluse meteorologist, Hannes (Sepp Rist), who lives alone at the top of a mountain. Both Hannes and his friend, pilot Ernst Udet (as himself), are vying for Hella. Hannes who thinks he has lost, unknown to Hella, forgoes his vacation form the cabin to find his self caught in a storm without gloves. Moreover, things are about to get worse. Will Hella find out in time to save him? Is Ernst still his friend and be able to fly to his aid? Or will this end with a Hannes-cycle?

At first I thought that this film was not too sophisticated even for the time with its stilted dialog and frivolous story. Later the film the story started to come together to be more intriguing. And when the storm struck it became downright fascinating.

The stars of the film are the mountains and the clouds (shot in elapse time.) This is one of the earliest of the series of German Mountain Movies. While Leni Riefenstahl was acting in this film, she learned the fundamentals of filming techniques that she expanded on in the films that she directed.

The version I watched has the option of English subtitles, which helped when Leni mumbled. However occasionally you could hear the words and the subtitles were a very lose paraphrase.

The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Light on plot but a gripping and spectacular survival story with a real sense of danger 22 April 2013
By Trevor Willsmer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Arnold Fanck's once hugely popular `berg' (mountain) films have suffered a lot of historical revisionism because of the later Nazi associations of many of those involved - not only Leni Riefenstahl and future Luftwaffe bigwig Ernst Udet but even Fanck himself, although he may only have joined the Party to be allowed to continue making films. While the films themselves had an obvious appeal to some of the strength through health and mythical attitudes of the Nazi party with their emphasis on the physical in their epic tales of man versus nature, there's no political content, just old-fashioned melodrama set against an epic stage: location pictures in every sense of the word where what people do is more important than what they stand for. You get the feeling that he was more like King Kong's Carl Denham, constantly testing himself on dangerous locations only to be nagged into adding romantic interest for the sake of the box-office. 1930's Storm Over Mont Blanc, his first talkie, is a perfect example.

There's not much in the way of plot en route to its memorable finale, but it moves a lot faster than Fanck's more famous mountain rescue epic The White Hell of Pitz Palu, throwing in a playful ski chase and a flight to the mountaintop weather station that allows Riefenstahl to meet cute with Sepp Rist's weather man she knows only from his Morse code reports. Their growing romance is briefly postponed after an accident on the mountain and further thwarted by a less than convincing bit of plotting that sees his musician friend she nurses back to health down below fall in love with her. When he writes of his plans to marry her, it causes the forlorn Rist to stay in his remote cabin for another season only for a minor accident to leave him stranded in ever worsening conditions, his frost-bitten hands preventing him from making his own way down or even hold a match to light a fire to stay alive as a storm front moves in...

There's no big chiaroscuro set piece like the recovery of the corpses from the crevasse in The White Hell of Pitz Palu, but there is a better sense of storytelling and narrative economy this time round. The plot may be simple - girl meets boy, boy thinks he's lost girl, girl and WW1 fighter ace rescue boy - but unlike its predecessor, when Rist finds himself trapped on the top of the mountain with frostbite he doesn't just sit around waiting to be rescued but actually tries to save himself, with spectacular results. Fanck's reputation for sadism is clearly to the fore in the footage of a real skier (possibly even Rist himself: Fanck thought nothing of putting actor's in harm's way) trying to out ski a very real and very spectacular avalanche in a film that has little truck with special effects (a few shots of lightning do look fake but the rest of the storm footage is very obviously the real thing). And rather than just leave him in a hole, the film keeps digging it deeper: crosscutting his forlorn return to his cabin as he battles against a storm with his shelter's door being blown off and window smashed, eerily filling it with snow to deny him any respite.

Mont Blanc never becomes a character in the way that Pitz Palu does, but the footage is still impressive and exudes a sense of real danger. As in Fanck's other Berg films, you're constantly aware that both cast and crew put themselves in harm's way, but as compelling as the life or death climax is, there are still some good moments to be found elsewhere. There's a fascinating scene of Udet cutting his plane's engine and gliding past the cabin so he can carry out a conversation with Rist below, some energetic and visually striking footage of skiers zigzagging around each other on a scavenger hunt, a crosscut sequence contrasting Rist's Christmas in his cabin with its tiny tree with the huge tree in the hotel below (nature in the raw versus nature tamed, perhaps?), not to mention the futile attempts by his would-be rescuers to get across a crevasse.

While it's nominally a talking picture, it's really a silent movie, the bulk of the film rarely featuring dialogue or even much in the way of sound effects and many scenes played almost mute. People only really talk down in the valleys below: once they're on the slopes it lets music, the sound of the wind or the rumble of an avalanche do most of its talking for it. Sometimes that's just as well, since Udet's dialogue in particular isn't terribly well synched and none of the other actors have anything worth saying. Yet in other respects it's still way beyond what Hollywood was doing at the time, avoiding the studio as much as possible to awe its audience with its imagery. Today it's pretty much the least remembered of Fanck's films, despite its belated US release as Avalanche ending up a source of stock material like many foreign films (some of the amazing avalanche footage found its way into Capra's Lost Horizon). Even the 90-minute print on Kino's NTSC DVD shows a bit more wear and tear than their other Fanck films, as if no-one thought it important enough to store properly or restore, but it's a decent survival story as long as you're not looking for a complex plot or rich characterisation.

The DVD also includes one of Fanck's silent short films, Cloud Phenomena of the Maloja. With stunning footage of mountaineers looking down on clouds below as they float by or pour over outcrops like waterfalls, it's the kind of thing you suspect Fanck was happier with: just his beloved mountains with none of that story or character nonsense.
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Great acting by clouds 15 Nov 2006
By Susan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
No, seriously...this is another German Mountain Film by Joseph Fanck, the director Leni Riefenstahl worked for as an actress and learned so much from. Fanck's filming technique clearly influenced Riefenstahl's own directorial work; one can especially see this in Olympia, her film of the 1934 Berlin Olympics.

This film was mostly silent but had some speaking parts and sound effects. Mostly silent because this film focuses on the elements of nature...hence my title "Great acting by clouds"...Fanck really focuses on the beauty of the mountains, the cloud formations as they drift by the jagged mountain peaks, the deep snow and the crevasses, the avalanches, etc. It is a visually beautiful film, and the cloud action is quite stunning.

The basic story is about a sturdy rugged German man who monitors a weather station in a fragile hut precariously perched on a precipitous peak in the Pyrenees. His is a lonely life, spent gazing at the clouds drifting by, having a nice soapy sponge bath from his enamel bowl, smoking his pipe, listening to his organist friend play on the radio, and taking daily jaunts to his anemometer to check the current wind speed.

In the evenings, he gazes at stars through his telescope, a hobby he shares from a distance with a beautiful young friend (Leni Riefenstahl) who works with the professor at the local observatory. Later these two meet in his hut, for her father is a good friend of his. During this visit, tragedy happens, and the sturdy German weatherman sends Leni to visit his organist friend down in the village in case she gets lonely. The organist happens to be sick with a fever and Leni nurses him back to health. In her mind she is only a good friend to him, but he has fallen hard for his "nurse" and sends word to his weatherman friend up on the mountain they are soon to be engaged, before he even has asked Leni for her hand in marriage. This misunderstanding causes another tragedy to occur involving the weatherman...which begins when his gloves blow away when he visits the anemometer on a rather blustery day. All ends well though, and Leni comes to the rescue of her weatherman, and builds a fire for him in his little stove in the hut, and he now knows she loves him and not the organ player after all.

This film gives us an interesting glimpse of a weather station of long ago ( I worked in a weather station on the island of Bermuda, and so seeing the anemometer spinning brought back a lot of memories for me!) in a very dangerous place. I am surprised a man would live alone in such a place where danger could happen anytime. It was interesting to see the people skiing in just woolen knickers, shirts and sweater vests (there are some great skiing sequences in this film too), and to see men climbing mountains and leaping from peak to peak with very little safety equipment. This film is very good if you take it for what it is, a German MOUNTAIN film. It is about the mountains, the story is secondary. I must say I thought THE HOLY MOUNTAIN, another Fanck film also starring Leni Riefenstahl, was much better because the story had a bit more depth. It is good to see what the Germans were doing with film as compared to Hollywood at the time...Fanck gave beautiful imagery of nature more than imagery of the actors. It is good that Kino has made these films available for those who want to see some German Mountain films. Also, there are English subtitles for the few speaking parts in the film.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Brilliant Cinematography Is Chief Asset 2 Feb 2012
By Gary F. Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
There are two reasons to watch STORM OVER MONT BLANC. The first the cinematography and editing as supervised by director Arnold Fanck, one of the creators of the German "Mountain Movie"--a genre in which the purity of life on the montain is essentially an abstract character. The second is that the film stars a young Leni Riefenstahl, a gifted but notorious artist who would go on to become Adolph Hitler's favorite actress, director, and creator of two landmark pieces of Nazi propaganda: TRIUMPH OF THE WILL and OLYMPIAD.

That having been said, there's not actually a lot to this film. Hannes (Sepp Rist) lives at a remote weather station on Mont Blanc. Hella (Riefenstahl) is, unexpectedly, an astronomer who lives in the village below. Although they have never met, they develop a friendship through Morse Code, and Hella ultimately decides to visit Hannes, taking her father (Friedrich Kayssler) as chaperone. Unfortunately, tragedy ensues and her father is killed in an accident. Hella leaves the mountainside, where she has a brief interest in a musician, but she cannot escape the call of Mont Blanc, and she returns to Hannes just in time to avert yet another tragedy.

Although the film is of the sound era and contains a few bits of spoken dialogue, it is essentially a silent film. The actors are adequate, although I found the endlessly hearty physical culture a bit wearing after a time. Riefenstahl is not remarkable for looks or, frankly, for her talent as an actress in this film--but she does have an unusual quality that is hard to define and which is unexpectedly appealing; it is interesting to see her before she was sucked into the Nazi machine. And then, of course, there is that cinematography, which is nothing short of spectacular, and which includes notions about film that Riefenstahl would later use as a director.

The film is--I think it will appeal to those who are interested in European film and films of this period in particular. But it really is best left, I think, to film scholars. It is watchable, the photography is memorable, but there's not much else to it.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Brilliant 28 April 2011
By David H. Osborne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I bought this as Leni Reifenstahl (Hitlers favourite Director) was acting in it.She seemed to be in a lot of films around mountains.Ernst Udet the WW1 fighter ace flies a plane in it and the scenery is spectacular.Must have been difficult to film on a mountain during a storm but this is very watchable, and recommended.Enjoy!
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