Your Music Library
  MP3 Basket

No More Stories Are Told Today I'm Sorry They Washed Away No More Stories The World Is Grey I'm Tired Let's Wash Away

24 Aug 2009

£6.99 (VAT included if applicable)

Get it on Google Play Available on the App Store with iTunes Available at Amazon Get our free music app
More Options
  • Sample this album Title (Sample)
1
30
3:14
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
2
30
4:45
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
3
30
2:45
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
4
30
2:31
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
5
30
0:27
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
6
30
4:00
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
7
30
7:12
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
8
30
1:47
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
9
30
4:59
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
10
30
5:07
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
11
30
4:28
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
12
30
0:58
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
13
30
5:10
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket
14
30
5:33
Play in Library Buy: £0.99 In MP3 Basket View MP3 Basket

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 14 Aug. 2009
  • Release Date: 14 Aug. 2009
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:56
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002JEOHVS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,738 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Toby Staunton on 15 Sept. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Once you have condensed the somewhat off putting title to simply 'No More Stories' then you can start listening to what Mew have to say this time around, and it really is very good indeed. Each of Mew's albums has its own character and this one is no different. Debut 'A Triumph for Man' is a striding and confident album filled with accessible yet innovative tracks. Follow up 'Half the World is Watching Me' is a more of a straight out rock album which laid the building blocks for third album 'Frengers' which is joyously anthemic and almost poppy at moments. Fourth album '...and the Glass Handed Kites' is a master stroke with an almost consistent flow pitching you from epic highs like 'Zookeeper's Boy', 'Saviours of Jazz Ballet' and 'An Envoy to the Open Fields' to the crunching devastation of 'Apocolypso'.

So what does this fifth album do different. It is a strangely broken album. Opening track 'New Terrain' almost sounds like it is being played backwards with synths that cut short like the passing of a police car siren. It gives the track the feeling that it is constantly trying to catch up with itself and yet at the end it opens into a gently humming organ part that rolls straight into the broken guitars of 'Introducing Palace Players'. This track bounces like the drunken dance at the end of a long night. It is exhilarating though slightly uncoordinated. 'Beach' chimes and jumps into the sunshine and takes you along for the ride like all good pop songs should.

Then we get a little more serious. 'Repeaterbeater' is a plodding widescreen rock song. By this point in the album the quality is really starting to shine through, and this is proven fantastically by 'Silas the Magical Car'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Leslie Silkowski on 7 Jan. 2010
Format: Audio CD
I'm new to Mew, having only come across them whilst looking for artistes similar to Thirteen Senses. Whilst I can see some similarities, what with the falseto voice and piano-based music (on a couple of occasions on the wonderful Cartoons And Macrame Wounds singer Jonas actually sounds more like Will South than the Thirteen Senses frontman himself!), Mew definately have that certain something about them that makes them impossible to pigeon-hole with other bands. Please give the backwardesque-sounding opening track New Terrain a chance as it definitely grows on you after a few listens. This is followed by the seratonin overdose that is the ultra-catchy Introducing Palace Players, which features an amazing last-minute cocktail of heavy synth, guitar and voice combo which leaves you punching the air in a gimme more kinda way before moving onto the pop-tastic Beach. Repeaterbeater is gloriously pumping up-tempo stuff, Silas The Magic Car is another beautiful track, whilst Cartoons And Macrame Wounds is a gorgeous cacophony of beautiful tunes and vocals amidst a dreamy backdrop which this band seem to have made their own.

Hawaii is another track atypical of these Danes' unique brand of audio-lushness. Vaccine ups the tempo perfectly on a CD where the track order is nothing if not perfect - so much so that to truly appreciate this body of work, it really has to be played in whole without skipping any tracks (not that any are worthy of skipping). Tricks Of The Trade is another favourite, as is Sometimes Life Isn't Easy. The album closes with the delicous melody that is Reprise, a piece of music that just leaves you wanting more.

Whatever else you purchase, make sure this masterpiece is in your shopping basket. Listen to it a few times, become addicted, recomment to your friends if they have good taste in music and be forever appreciated as the one who brought this CD-shaped ray of sunshine into their lives!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By theone&only on 5 Dec. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Hell yes it was worth the wait! I was worried when i watched the making of the new album online. Looking even less like rock stars and sounding less rock had me worried for a moment. When I got the album my worst fears came true - Mew looking like their mums had dressed them in the inlay pictures and first song 'New Terrain' sounding like backwards 70's space prog. Oh dear. But then something happened. After a few spins things began making sense. Gone is the bombastic rock production of Beinhorn on their last album which, to be honest, having listened to this album many times now, never really suited their ethos anyway.

Sophisticated dreamy pop is how I would now describe what Mew are doing, although as all the Mew fans know - summing up their sound with a throwaway categorisation should best be left to the emos. 'Introducing Palace Players' is a gorgeous first single and songs like 'Silas The magic Car' and 'Sometimes Life Isn't Easy' are majestic and uplifting. It defies belief that a band can make something so amazing out of a few chords a bit of production but Mew have done it again. Not one of the songs can be described as having a fast tempo which you would think would make for a boring sounding record...but no. Instead this record is comfortable in itself and its pace kept to a minimum to try and show off its assets which it effortlessly does.
Still unique, still gifted and better than ever this is their best album IMO.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Simon A. Woodhart VINE VOICE on 8 Sept. 2009
Format: Audio CD
I would first off like to rid Mew of any comparison's to "prog-rock" bands such as Muse and Sigur Ros, etc. as they are invalid and lazy. Sure, one can take elements such as falsetto vocals and pretentious album titles and tie-in band X with Y, but what's the point? The overall content couldn't be more dissimilar, and everyone knows that comparison's, although sometimes helpful, are largely false and only set-up the uninitiated for disappointment.

`No More Stories...' is quite a departure from the largely brilliant,`And the Glass Handed Kites'. Guitars take a back seat to synths and darker lyrical themes of paranoia are replaced with fantasies of Hawaii. Not to say that this is a light-hearted romp as there are shards of darkness littered throughout, and of all the songs I would only classify `Beach' as pure pop. Jonas' ethereal vocals combine very well with the lighter instrumentals and the melodies are some of the best Mew have concocted thus far.

Stand-out tracks for me are: `Introducing Palace Players' (I shan't hear a better dance rock track), `Silas the Magic Car', `Tricks of the Trade' and `Repeater Beater'. The track that truly encapsulates the brilliance of this album though would be "Sometimes Life Isn't Easy". It is bombastic, beautiful and feels far too short despite its 5 and a half minutes or so length. The moment the bass kicks in after the lyrics, "I was blaming myself" is blissful, and I doubt that I will appreciate the use of a choir composed of children more than here (it couldn't be less elsewhere).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category