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Stopover Tokyo [Hardcover]

John P. Marquand
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 254 pages
  • Publisher: Collins; New edition edition (17 Jun 1957)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0854680616
  • ISBN-13: 978-0854680610
  • Product Dimensions: 21.4 x 14.4 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,918,434 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Mr. Moto's Last Appearance 12 Nov 2004
Format:Hardcover
Mr. Moto made his last appearance in 1957, twelve years after the end of World war II and a lapse of fifteen years since his previous appearances before World War II. This is a Cold War story and Moto is definitely working as an American ally in STOPOVER:TOKYO.
Moto is much older now and in a very senior position in Japanese intelligence. He returns to the field only because the situation is critical.Moto is not a real name, only a suffix, and this helps to keep him anonymous. He is described as graying and possessing old world manners. Moto reminisces about intelligence work in the 1920's and admits to being in San Francisco in 1912. He comes from old aristocracy and was educated in the United states. Moto is fascist, pro-emperor, anti-communist and stands for old Japan. He is still quick with a knife although he is getting too old for much violence.
There is always a young couple playing a prominent role in every Mr. Moto story. It usually is an American in the Orient who falls in love with a girl already involved in espionage. Mr. Moto's role seems to be to help the couple and intervene when necessary. What makes STOPOVER:TOKYO different in this instance is that the young people are both professional spies. They are in Tokyo to infiltrate a suspicious organization fronting for the Soviets who strive to create a major international incident damaging to the American position in Japan. Moto is as deadly as ever taking out the bad guys but he is now more apt to delegate the task to subordinates. This is clearly the best Mr. Moto book in the series.
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Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dastardly dudes' dark deeds doom dame 31 Mar 2008
By Bob Newman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I read this thriller over fifty years ago as a teenager. I think it was better then. Not only because I was younger, but because it fit into the world as it was. Now, it's definitely dated. The American agent in the "Orient" (sigh) dealing with all these "inscrutable" Japanese, a lovely agent by his side. They chase the inevitable "Commies" and "fellow travellers" who use every dirty trick in the book though they are American too. Our hero has superman-grade qualifications---speaks languages, former football player, knows weapons, was a paratrooper and tough fighter during the recent war in the Pacific, handsome, well-spoken, no ties to anyone--and is constantly obsessing about his "cover". Oh, and of course, he can hold his liquor. Everyone is always drinking.

The bad guys are planning something, maybe an assassination in Tokyo which can be pinned on the Americans. Jack Rhyce has to find the agents, learn the plans, and foil them. Beautiful Ruth assists him. But, they fall in love and dream about leaving the lonely life of secret agents for "outside". They meet up with a Mr. Moto. Hey, don't you remember this character from the series before the war ? Then, he was a tricky fellow on the other side, now he's with us. Marquand has finally twigged that "Moto" is not a Japanese name and lets you know. A bit late but. Mr. Moto's English is still the same. Japanese culture is not J.P. Marquand's strong suit. Well, what do you bet that Jack Rhyce manages to do the impossible ? Will Jack and Ruth live happily ever after ? Clint Eastwood fans know the answer to that one. Readers interested in a half-century old view of Tokyo from American eyes might find the background interesting. Unlike modern thrillers, there is zero sex. It's a competently written thriller which might keep your mind off any troubles for a few hours. J.P.Marquand is one of America's most unremembered great writers, but these Mr. Moto books he wrote for either fun, cash, or both.
5.0 out of 5 stars Mr. Moto's Last Appearance 13 Nov 2004
By Peter Kenney - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Mr. Moto made his last appearance with this book in 1957, twelve years after the end of World War II and a lapse of fifteen years since his previous appearances before World War II. This is a Cold War story and Moto is definitely working as an American ally in STOPOVER:TOKYO.

Moto is much older now and in a very senior but invisible position in Japanese intelligence. He returns to the field only because the situation is critical. Moto is not a real name, only a suffix, and this helps to keep him anonymous. He is described as graying and possessing old world manners. He comes from old aristocracy and was educated in the United States. Moto is fascist and anti-communist. He is still quick with a knife although he is getting too old for violence.

There is always a young couple playing a prominent role in every Mr. Moto story. It usually is an American in the Orient who falls in love with a girl already involved in espionage. Mr. Moto's role seems to be to help the couple and intervene when necessary. What makes STOPOVER:TOKYO different in this instance is that the young people are both professional spies. They are in Tokyo to infiltrate a suspicious organization fronting for the Soviets who strive to create a major international incident damaging to the American position in Japan. Moto is as deadly as ever taking out the bad guys but he is now more apt to delegate the task to subordinates. This is clearly the best Mr. Moto book in the series.
2.0 out of 5 stars Not the Best Mr. Moto 22 Feb 2012
By Carl E. Ahlm - Published on Amazon.com
"Stopover: Tokyo" was the last of the Mr. Moto books written in 1957 by J.P.Marquand. I love mysteries and especially some of the "older" or classical mysteries, particularly Holmes and Poirot. However, I also confess a deep enjoyment some of the famous Oriental sleuths or mysteries of the early 1900's, especially the wonderful Charlie Chan and the equally sinister, Chinese evil genius, Fu Manchu, which lead me to the Mr. Moto series. This is only the second Moto I have read, and I will go out on a limb and say, it may be the worst. It is "OK;" but it is steeped in the time and place of the post WWII cold war. Japanese culture is not Marquand's strong suit, and some of the stereotyping is very hard to get past.

Mr. Moto's English is still the same (similar to Charlie Chan's) and with both characters, one has the sense of the great wisdom behind a somewhat stereotypical facade. Even our American agent hero is larger than life: a handsome, college educated, former football player, who is knowledgeable in many languages, who was in the paratroopers in the "East" during WWII, who knows his weapons, and, of course, who can hold his booze! His sidekick agent is an attractive, college educated, upper-class woman, Ruth Bogart, who knows her stuff. They, of course, chase the inevitable "Commies" who are getting ready to assassinate a leader and putting the blame on America. Our two young agents, as capable as they may be, naturally fall in love and dream about leaving the lonely life of secret agents for the freedom of the "outside" (awwwwwww!). Eventually (almost half way into the book), they meet up with Mr. Moto, who poses as a guide for them in Japan and who they believe is an enemy agent. Not the most cunning or clever plots or characterizations ever, hence my larger problem than just Japanese culture as to stereotyping.

Although the book has some severe problems, it is still worth the read; the ending is not stereotypical by any means.
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