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Stone Of Farewell: Memory, Sorrow and Thorn Series: Book Two (Memory, Sorrow & Thorn) Paperback – 5 Dec 1991

23 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 896 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (5 Dec. 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857237862
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857237863
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,074,826 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Former singer, shoe-seller and radio show host, Tad Williams is now a full-time writer. His Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series established him as one of the most internationally popular fantasy authors of recent years.

Product Description

Review

I was rarely held so captive by a novel...Williams is our Tolkien (FEAR)

Epic fantasy you can get lost in for days, not just hours (LOCUS)

Tad Williams proves himself as adept at writing science fiction as he is at writing fantasy. Best of all, however, are Williams's well-drawn sympathetic characters . . . (PUBLISHERS WEEKLY)

Book Description

Book two of the epic Memory, Sorrow and Thorn series

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rachael Winfield on 1 July 2003
Format: Paperback
It is the second in a epic of four books, but there is a review at the front of the book giving an overview of the past novel. This book though was amazing to read, Tad Williams is a great writer and you lose time as he sends you through the travels of the characters. The prince who should be a king, commanding a hill, helping those in need, while his brother, the king, gets into even more trouble. Simon stays for a while in another world (almost). Trouble brews all around. It is a gripping tale and one that will leave you pleading for the next book.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Mar. 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The second book in the trilogy, the quest has now built up to breathtaking levels of unsuperable doom! This should be a standard text for would-be fantasy authors. It has everything, magic swords, dragons etc.etc., beautifully realised in 'a world gone mad' (tho' no elephants yet!). The pivotal character, Simon, starts off in the kitchens, as is only right, proper and traditional in these sagas but is soon caught up in a world threatening conspiracy which aims to ensure the return of the evil (and technically dead) Storm King, a vengeful, disembodied elf-prince. Williams' deft touch with ongoing cataclysm hurtles you through interesting quantities of weather and slaughter without letting the pace drop and spits you out breathless and hungry for the next instalment. The fact that this trilogy is barely portable is an advantage in my view, as it's so difficult to find books that last longer than a snack but don't get bogged down in 'on the three hundredth day of our quest we saw lots more grass and some mountains'. If this tale has a fault it is only that, in common with his other yarns, it takes a little while to warm up at the beginning, once its feet are under it, the actions never lets up. A superior example of its genre.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 Nov. 2000
Format: Paperback
This is the second volume in the Memory, Sorrow and Thorn Tetralogy (starting with The Dragonbone Chair, ending with To Green Angel Tower: Siege and To Green Angel Tower: Storm).
As the great Storm is building up in the North and a terrible winter is spreading all over Osten Ard, Simon and his friends escape from Yiqanuc and start their long and perilous journey down the mountain and across the frozen plains to the Stone of Farewell, where they have to meet Prince Josua's party of exiles and deliver the sword Thorn.
In the meantime Princess Miriamele, accompanied by the enigmatic Brother Cadrach, travels southwards to seek help from her family, Maegwin and her folk hide in the Grianspog caves, where she discovers what seems like an ancient Sithi city, and King Elias and his advisor, the red priest and alchemist Pryrates conspire with the evil Norns.
A great epic, full of unexpected new turns as the plot unfolds, varied characters you get immediately attached to, and marvelously detailed descriptions, like those of the beautiful legendary cities of the Elf-like Sithi folk. Definitely a great read. Can't wait to read To Green Angel Tower.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. Jonsson on 3 April 2003
Format: Paperback
The second part of this fantasy masterpiece never stops to surprise you!
It gives many many new acquaintances, a deeper plot than most stories can offer and so many ethnic and religious details, which give the story a deeper plausibility than most contemporary fantasy novels.
Williams' work is rapidly overtaking many other read fantasy series and climbing ever upwards on my top ten.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert Dodds on 26 April 2010
Format: Paperback
I've just finished this book, the second in the series, and it would be a lie to say that I haven't enjoyed reading it. Tad Williams is not a bad writer, in fact he is a very good writer. He is able to elicit an emotional response from the reader (well, me anyway) towards his characters due to his descriptions of their feelings and emotions which arise in certain situations. Feelings of attraction, lust, awkwardness, anger, grief, sorrow, loneliness and many others are represented well, and the characters deal with these feelings in a believable way which allows us to empathise with them. Particularly impressive to me were Simon's grief following the loss of a friend, and Miriamele's confused feelings during and after the continuous advances of a creepy attractive man. Simon's emotions at being a prisoner in a large and beautiful prison, with passive and intelligent captors, were also very believable and interesting. The mixture of friendliness and anger felt towards his regretful jailors was a nice touch, which went well with the unusual situation.

Williams also has an ability to drop you in the centre of an intense action scene. More than once I found myself completely immersed in the scene being described to me. It almost becomes as if you are watching the action play out through your mind's eye, rather than reading words from a page in front of you. The book is there, but at times you almost forget the physical form of the book entirely. Instead you see the action which is written on the page, and find your heart rate rising correspondingly.

On the negative side these action segments were too short, and too few and far between for my taste, which is one of the things that brings this down to a 3 star rating for me. The plot is also quite weak.
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