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Stolen Kisses (Baisers voles) [1968] [DVD]


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Product details

  • Actors: Jean-Pierre Léaud, Delphine Seyrig, Claude Jade, Michael Lonsdale, Harry-Max
  • Directors: François Truffaut
  • Writers: François Truffaut, Claude de Givray, Bernard Revon
  • Producers: François Truffaut
  • Format: PAL, Widescreen, Colour, Subtitled
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: 2entertain
  • DVD Release Date: 19 Feb. 2007
  • Run Time: 87 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000KF0WUI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 104,773 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

François Truffaut directs this madcap romantic comedy set in 1960s Paris. The third in a series of five films, the movie features Truffaut's cinematic alter-ego Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud) who, having received a dishonourable discharge from the army at the age of 20, works his way through a number of unsatisfactory jobs and transient relationships.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Pismotality on 21 April 2009
This DVD contains the short film Antoine and Collette (extracted from the three-short compendium Love at Twenty) which technically is the sequel to Truffaut's The 400 Blows. Stolen Kisses, a full-length feature, carries on the saga of Truffaut's alter ego Antoine Doinel so it's the first full-length sequel - and far more inventive and funnier than the later films (Bed and Board and Love on the Run) in the Doinel series.

I saw all or most of the Antoine Doinel films many years ago and before I watched Stolen Kisses again for the purpose of these notes had misgivings: I had retained a distinct impression of diminishing returns by the final film in the series (Love on the Run), but Stolen Kisses is, somewhat to my surprise, a delight: the name of Lubitsch is invoked several times in the commentary and many passages do seem gossamer-light in the manner of that master.

For most of the film Antoine is working for a detective agency and relationships are woven around that plot strand so - to put it crudely - it's not just him mooning about some girl. So a bit of Lubitsch and a bit of Hitchcock (Truffaut idolised him and conducted a famous series of interviews with him) results in a souffle which, on this occasion, rises. Of the later Doinel films, Bed and Board is agreeable enough but more convential, while Love on the Run is a sort of benefit night for Doinel (lots of clips from the earlier films) so if you have recently been introduced to The 400 Blows I would check this one out but approach the others with caution.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David L Rattigan VINE VOICE on 9 Aug. 2008
This is an altogether more whimsical affair than Truffaut's The 400 Blows, in which we were first introduced to Antoine Doinel. Here he is ten years later, grown up and trying to make his way in the world, with a succession of jobs - and women. It's all very droll, but makes for good drama, too. A real delight thanks to a good cast, great Parisian locations and a very catchy score by Antoine Duhamel.

My favourite line comes from shoe-shop owner Michel Lonsdale, trying to explain why he requires the services of a private investigator: "I have a feeling I am being hated... But I don't know by who."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Filmfan on 29 Mar. 2012
Truffaut's films belong in the cinema. They are intentionally documentary. They are supposed to testify to the filmmaker's experience of the world in which he lived. He made his films at speed, frequently and often with the same teams and cinematographer and, of course, with the same actor. They can almost be seen as articulate news-reports on the private lives of the French in the 60's and early 70's, running in parallel with a Zeitgeist. Many of the techniqes he and Almendros (his most frequent DP) pioneered are still being processed and revisited today. Truffaut's tool-kit is almost like that of a 24/7 plumbing service: he'll be round before you know it and the tools work, but there isn't much time to chat. This can mean, in cinema-terms, Truffaut leaves a light foot-print; if he is slightly off-rhythm, the result can be pulled-punches and of being lightly concussed by a feather duster. In a cinema, this touch is, at least, supplemented by the beauty of natural light (where that kind of print is still being screened). On TV/DVD, a slighter film can almost evaporate by the time the first reel is over. This is one of those. Shot against the riots of '68 in Paris, it turns out that Truffaut and his team, while they should have been shooting this, were actively campaigning for the reinstatement of the New Wave's mentor, who had been replaced in a political coup by the reactionary authorities. Instead of applying their skills to the mise-en-scene, they were drinking coffee elsewhere. The real subject of his film should have been Truffaut's political campaign and not Doisnel's continuing shaggy-dog story. The film feels like a series of elegantly combined sketches which never quite add up to the soul of a film. 'The Man Who Loved Women' is a much, much, better film. This one left me wanting to see students shouting at the CRS riot police and not the quieter corners of a Paris that Truffaut's normally every reliable sensibility just fails to inhabit.
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0 of 11 people found the following review helpful By mv on 16 Jan. 2010
another dull film in the series - such a poor result, given the excellence of the first film (400 blows). Do we care if the hero finds happiness? not any more.
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