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Still on the Road: The Songs of Bob Dylan Vol. 2 1974-2008 Hardcover – 29 Apr 2010

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Frequently Bought Together

Still on the Road: The Songs of Bob Dylan Vol. 2 1974-2008 + Revolution in the Air: The Songs of Bob Dylan 1957-1973 (Songs of Bob Dylan Vol 1) + Behind the Shades: The 20th Anniversary Edition
Price For All Three: £46.58

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 494 pages
  • Publisher: Constable (29 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849010110
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849010115
  • Product Dimensions: 15.7 x 4.7 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 48,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Clinton Heylin, master explicator of the Dylan canon, has however improbably, sorted it all out for us through the tangled '80's and beyond, completing what he started in Revolution in the Air. The book is essential. (Jonathan Lethem)

Rarely does and author put an artist's creative process under such forensic scrutiny-and stitch his findings together with such success (Metro Herald Ireland)

The only essential read for Bobcats. (Time Out)

Review. (Contemporary Review)

Book Description

The second volume of the bestselling history of Bob Dylan's songs

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By J. H. Bretts VINE VOICE on 25 April 2010
Format: Hardcover
As Clinton Heylin points out in his introduction, Bob Dylan wrote his first 300 songs in the space of only 13 years, but it took him 33 years to write the next 300. And it is also the case that far more attention has been paid to those early songs than the one that followed,with many column inches of over-analysis spent on them. So it is great to have a book which which deals fully with the diverse and surprising songs written between 1974-2008, not only because critics up to now have dealt cursorily with them but because, as Heylin shows,so many are real gems.

This book brings out Heylin's strengths, which are that he is a researcher, with a real eye for detail, who finds out new things about Dylan's songs and how they were written (and rewritten!), recorded and transformed in live performance. The book is full of insightful details. On the other hand , it does display Heylin's weaknesses as a writer - particularly a clunky style and an urge to be judgemental when it come to Dylan the human being as opposed to the artist. That said, this is a really fascinating and much needed account of Bob Dylan's ability to continue to develop his art over the last four decades. Recommended.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Hugh Crawford on 26 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Clinton Heylin of course divides his readers into 2 camps; for and against, just as Heylin himself clearly cannot abide Michael Gray or Greil Marcus. I like opinionated writers-provided of course that their views are not too diametrically opposed to my own!!!- and I am in sympathy with most of Heylin's views although I would agree with another reviewer on here who feels that he is too dismissive about the post 1997 albums which I like particularly, albeit less so regarding "Together through life" The book is full of fascinating information. I found his referencing of biblical texts in relation to the songs very interesting, as I had been under the impression that Dylan's christianity somehow petered out in the 1990s. This is clearly not the case. Heylin's comments on the "Under the red sky" album are also extremely revealing, and shed a whole new light on this neglected and depreciated work. The book is also generally very well proof read and so lacks that typical curse of the "modern" book, endless spelling mistakes etc... Highly recommende
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By RL EARTH on 29 Aug. 2010
Format: Hardcover
Having read Volume 1 - Revolution in the air, I knew pretty much what to expect. Mr Heylin's slightly eccentric, very assured style with his opinions stated at every opportunity, leaving very little room for any else's. However, as a reference work this book is indespensible, a must for the shelf of every true Dylan afficionado. The research and detail included is sometimes overwhelming and I know that having read the book from cover to cover, I will return to return to it many times in future to look up this or that. On the whole a good addition to the long list of Dylan books, a lot of which are not worth the paper they are written on, but this one certainly is.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dave Gilmour's cat on 30 April 2012
Format: Paperback
A great piece of research and a brilliant companion to the music itself. Clinton Heylin is opinionated, and this tends to divide readers, but there's no doubting how perceptive his writing is here. It's great to see the "difficult" 80s work getting as much scrutiny as the songs from the "classic era". Heylin brings it all into sharp focus and - best of all - makes you want to hear all of these songs again.
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Format: Hardcover
Whilst discussing the out- take version of "Someday Baby" which appears on Tell Tale Signs- The Bootleg Series Volume 8
Mr. Heylin quotes Dylan as singing " every day I'm coming home with a different grip"
It is only my opinion but does he not actually say "I'm becoming more of a hypocrite" ?
It is this kind of cloth eared lack of attention which, married to a seeming inability to relate to Dylan's oevre on an emotional and MUSICAL level- not to mention a pompous and cringeworthy literary style which really baffles me about (as he may say himself) Ol' Clint.
In the first volume of Behind The Shades he actually criticised Dylan for (I paraphrase from memory) "Not realising that nerves can't be simultaneously vacant AND numb" whilst discussing/ dismissing Not Dark Yet. At that precise moment of reading I knew I would never be able to get on with him despite his obvious depth of knowlege on the subject. I can only assume that he also knows the sun's not yellow- it's chicken!
I noticed that particular example of foisting his own rather narrow minded opinion on his readership had been excised from Take Two...maybe he would consider doing the same with the monumentally conceited device of inserting himself into Dylan's psyche at the end of that tome, whilst generally trashing whatever Dylan has done in the last twenty years.
I'm sorry this is more about Mr. Heylin than the book in question and I am guilty of the same crime of which I accuse him but he seems so frigid and unmusical and impervious to the sheer grit and soul and whatever it is in Bob Dylan's art that I have to put the book down after a few pages before I throw it through the nearest window...it is just so dry and reductive and obnoxious. And how I have tried!
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Format: Hardcover
A great piece of research and a brilliant companion to the music itself. Clinton Heylin is opinionated, and this tends to divide readers, but there's no doubting how perceptive his writing is here. It's great to see the "difficult" 80s work getting as much scrutiny as the songs from the "classic era". Heylin brings it all into sharp focus and - best of all - makes you want to hear all of these songs again.
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