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Stephen Sondheim: A Casebook (Casebooks on Modern Dramatists) [Kindle Edition]

Joanne Gordon
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


Product Description

From the Author

A fun book for Sondheim fans
I'm delighted to be the author of one of the chapters in this collection of essays. Because Joanne Gordon allowed each of us to focus very closely on one specific show or idea, we could really dig down deep and spend some time with this wonderful material. The variety of subject matter in the book is great, and it is a real treat to read such wide-ranging takes on Sondheim's work. The chapters range from the use of the Greek chorus in Sondheim shows to the question of whether "Company" still holds up today, to how "Follies" relates to Nixon's America, to the psychology of "Sweeney Todd," to a notebook on the chracters in "Night Music," to a discussion of the concept musical as a genre (my chapter). The book covers most of his musicals, as well as his one screenplay, "The Last of Shelia." and his relationship (personal and artistic) with Oscar Hammerstein II. If you love musicals, if you enjoy Sondheim, you'll find this book full of interesting stuff.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 770 KB
  • Print Length: 272 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 4 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Routledge (23 April 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00JVSJTUY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #777,358 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By G.C.
Format:Paperback
This volume of 14 essays, by 14 different authors, on selected works of Stephen Sondheim is aimed principally at an academic audience, and does not cover all of Sondheim's musicals individually. I also use the word "works" rather than musicals, because the essay by Douglas Braverman covers not a musical, but Sondheim's one original movie screenplay, "The Last of Sheila", although Braverman does tie this screenplay back to Sondheim's musicals, not surprisingly.

For the most part, even though the discussions are quite in depth and "academic" in that sense, the essays generally avoid literary jargon, so that Sondheim devotees or fanatics who aren't necessarily literary academics can also potentially derive much enjoyment from this collection. The one essay which lays on the literary terminology rather more is Gary Konas' essay on "Passion". To a lesser extent, Barbara Means Fraser also uses a few "heavier" academic terms of analysis, but since she fairly breezes through each musical in her analysis of the role of the chorus in Sondheim's musicals, there almost isn't time to get bogged down. I must confess as a small matter of personal taste that I found Judith Schlesinger's use of the line from "Sweeney Todd" of 'Don't I know you, mister?' as her essay closer very arch and self-conscious, in an otherwise good essay.

Although this volume certainly isn't "casual" reading, it is accessible enough for the intelligent lay-reader who is willing to focus on the task at hand. Sondheim fans will need no recommendation from me.
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Amazon.com: 0.0 out of 5 stars  0 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good compilation of in-depth essays on Sondheim works 9 Oct. 2011
By G.C. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This volume of 14 essays, by 14 different authors, on selected works of Stephen Sondheim is aimed principally at an academic audience, and does not cover all of Sondheim's musicals individually. I also use the word "works" rather than musicals, because the essay by Douglas Braverman covers not a musical, but Sondheim's one original movie screenplay, "The Last of Sheila", although Braverman does tie this screenplay back to Sondheim's musicals, not surprisingly.

For the most part, even though the discussions are quite in depth and "academic" in that sense, the essays generally avoid literary jargon, so that Sondheim devotees or fanatics who aren't necessarily literary academics can also potentially derive much enjoyment from this collection. The one essay which lays on the literary terminology rather more is Gary Konas' essay on "Passion". To a lesser extent, Barbara Means Fraser also uses a few "heavier" academic terms of analysis, but since she fairly breezes through each musical in her analysis of the role of the chorus in Sondheim's musicals, there almost isn't time to get bogged down. I must confess as a small matter of personal taste that I found Judith Schlesinger's use of the line from "Sweeney Todd" of 'Don't I know you, mister?' as her essay closer very arch and self-conscious, in an otherwise good essay.

Although this volume certainly isn't "casual" reading, it is accessible enough for the intelligent lay-reader who is willing to focus on the task at hand. Sondheim fans will need no recommendation from me.
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