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In Step
 
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In Step

23 Mar 1999 | Format: MP3

£6.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £7.29 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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4:09
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2:44
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 23 Mar 1999
  • Release Date: 23 Mar 1999
  • Label: Epic/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:10:05
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001GSHEYU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,172 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By "mikyel" on 24 April 2005
Format: Audio CD
After almost killing himself with his coke-tinged whiskey, and checking into rehab for more than a year, Stevie Ray Vaughan returned to Texas Flood-form with his last album, In Step. It is a wonderfully organised and structured album, finding Stevie Ray performing some of the best songs in his list, and finally writing real songs.
For those who say Stevie Ray's playing on In Step is the worst he ever did, I don't agree in any way. Sure, his playing is refined and more controlled, but since when did a guitar player have to play lightening-fast skids to be a brilliant player - Especially in the blues? Never! In Step's playing is Stevie probably at his least pyrotechnical, but at his most blue: he takes time with his solos and runs to impart real blue emotion through his playing, instead of astounding everyone with the fastest blues anyone's ever heard. True, Stevie's amazing when he does this, but we saw him do that on Texas Flood and Couldn't Stand The Weather. Since those albums, he'd matured and grown both as a human and an artist, and In Step is the result of someone wanting to just play his blues out on the guitar.
It's a wonderful album and a definite cannot miss for ANYONE even remotely interested in Stevie Ray and the blues.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By S J Buck TOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 Dec 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is the last SRV studio album before his untimely death in 1990, and its one of the very best he ever made.

As you would expect there is some searing guitar playing on this album as well some of Stevie's best songs. How many variations on blues/rock can you do? Well based on this album it seems unlimited - 'Crossfire', 'Tightrope' are both classics in the SRV cannon. For pure blues 'Leave My Girl Alone' takes some beating and the opening track 'The House is Rockin'' is as rocking a boogie as you'll ever hear.

There are two elements to this album that are significantly different from SRV's early albums. Firstly the addition of Reese Wynans on Keyboards fills out the sound, so that SRV can play lead with more than just bass and drums behind him. Also if you know this album could you imagine 'The House is Rockin'' without the Piano? Secondly 'Riviera Paradise' which finishes this album is a very mellow laid-back instrumental, and by an odd coincidence this is the last-ever SRV track on a studio album, and its completely unlike any other track in his recording career.

Sadly Stevie Ray Vaughan's recording career was pretty short but he left us with this final great album. It should be in your collection!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Olly Buxton on 17 Feb 2005
Format: Audio CD
Stevie Ray Vaughan's fourth album saw him emerging healthy, happy and cleaned up of the worst drug and booze fuelled excesses of his rock 'n' roll adolescence. Of course there are good and bad things, from a rock icon's perspective (and his fans'), about growing up. In Step is the record of a man getting comfortable with himself and his achievements, with all the positive and negative connotations that brings.
At this point the argument "Can white men play the blues?" has been won hands down, Stevie Ray Vaughan sounds like a man who knows it - his guitar tone is by turns rich and beautiful (Riviera Paradise) fulsome and commanding (Travis Walk; Wall of Denial) and cheeky (Cross-Fire) but never genuinely throaty or bitching, as it is for the duration of Texas Flood, Couldn't Stand The Weather and the celebrated early live sets (it is my considered view, for instance, that everyone on this planet should be afforded the opportunity to see Stevie Ray Vaughan Live at the El Mocambo).
Indeed, at times SRV's famous Stratocaster, Number One, sounds positively compressed - odd for a man for whom fingers, strings and tubes were some sort of holy trinity, and digital processing more akin to an angel cast from the firmament.
For its part, Double Trouble is on song, and beautifully recorded - and as a pop record this is certainly Stevie Ray's most accessible entry, but if you're a raw blues tone freak like me, you may find it somewhat uninvolving.
Make no mistake: this is a great record, and worthy of sitting in any collection, but for my money Stevie Ray Vaughan's first two albums mentioned above and the outstanding, posthumously released, The Sky Is Crying are better ways of remembering the man who famously said:
"Tune low, play hard, and floor it. That's technical talk."
Olly Buxton
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Docendo Discimus TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 27 Jun 2003
Format: Audio CD
"In Step" is often cited by critics as Stevie Ray Vaughan's best studio album. And his playing on this album is actually a bit more economical, maybe even a bit more mannered, than on his earlier releases...whether or not that's a good thing is a matter of taste, I suppose.

The production is a bit more slick than usual as well, the tone of Vaughan's guitar is cleaner, and a keyboard player and occational horns have been added to the mix, but that's not to say that Stevie Ray Vaughan had gotten soft on his final solo album before his tragic death in 1990 - he just turned a little bit more towards rock rather than blues.

"In Step" opens with a blistering rocker, "The House Is Rockin'", followed by the bluesy "Crossfire", which features a superb solo by Vaughan.
"Tightrope" ventures into hard rock territory, but Stevie Ray's cover of Willie Dixon's "Let Me Love You Baby" is genuine blues-rock, and it is followed by a good reading of Buddy Guy's slow, tortured blues "Leave My Girl Alone". Vaughan didn't quite have the pipes to match the intensity of Guy's original, but he does a fine job with what he has, and the guitar playing is superb as usual.

"Travis Walk" is a funky, up-tempo instrumental with some great drumming by Chris Layton (who, incidentally, used to play drums for Buddy Guy and Lightnin' Hopkins). "Wall Of Denial" is pretty well known, but it is perhaps one of the lesser tracks on this album, with some fine guitar playing but not much in the way of either hooks or a real "groove" to grab a hold of the listener.

"Scratch n' Sniff", however, is a fine up-tempo rock song with some excellent boogie piano fills by keyboardist Reese Wynans, and a great solo by Vaughan.
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