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Stats and Curiosities: From Harvard Business Review Hardcover – 15 Oct 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press (15 Oct 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1422196313
  • ISBN-13: 978-1422196311
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 10.8 x 15.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 286,212 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Included in Publishers Weekly's Fall 2013 Announcements: "Fascinating stats, useful tips, and entertaining topics culled from the Harvard Business Review's popular newsletter, The Daily Stat, offer compelling insights that amuse and inform..." "Who knows what the value of these studies is, but they make for fun reading." -- Boston Globe

About the Author

About Harvard Business Review Harvard Business Review is the leading destination for smart management thinking. Through its flagship magazine, 11 international licensed editions, books from Harvard Business Review Press, and digital content and tools published on HBR.org, Harvard Business Review provides professionals around the world with rigorous insights and best practices to lead themselves and their organizations more effectively and to make a positive impact.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Wineberg TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 20 Oct 2013
Format: Hardcover
Stats & Curiosities is a very fast little collection of over 160 research findings, one to a page, and filling half a page or less each. They range from the obvious to the absurd, with many stops along the way. It seems that academic research has run out of ordinary things to study and has opened the doors to pretty much anything, especially in Canada, which jumps out as the largest single source of these "findings".

Here are ten I found worth remembering:

-Children cared for by grandmothers do much worse in test scores.
-Red makes auction participants bid more.
-Men with shaved heads are treated as taller and more powerful.
-Oxycontin more than doubled the number of subjects who trusted a total stranger with all their money.
-Despite the billions spent on ads, only 46% of American teens favor a car as one of their top 10 brands, down from 64% in 1998.
-The last passenger on a flight provides essentially the entire profit on that flight.
-Larger teams slow processes, develop larger forecasting errors, hamper co-ordination, increase conflicts, and diminish motivation. The ideal team size is two.
-Peppermint (the scent, not the candy) enhances attention, alertness, memory and mood.
-Mimicking a customer's speech pattern and behavior increases sales and impression of the whole store.

And last but probably most relevant: Reading too much useless information makes people 46% less likely to think clearly. People cannot perceive the extent of the uselessness of the information they read.

David Wineberg
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By Dr. M. Clayton on 14 Nov 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a trivia nut who loves the feeling of finding a gem that can be useful in my (speaking and writing) work. This has several. Please don't buy it!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Forewarned = Forearmed? 11 Oct 2013
By David Wineberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Stats & Curiosities is a very fast little collection of over 160 research findings, one to a page, and filling half a page or less each. They range from the obvious to the absurd, with many stops along the way. It seems that academic research has run out of ordinary things to study and has opened the doors to pretty much anything, especially in Canada, which jumps out as the largest single source of these "findings".

Here are ten I found worth remembering:

-Children cared for by grandmothers do much worse in test scores.
-Red makes auction participants bid more.
-Men with shaved heads are treated as taller and more powerful.
-Oxycontin more than doubled the number of subjects who trusted a total stranger with all their money.
-Despite the billions spent on ads, only 46% of American teens favor a car as one of their top 10 brands, down from 64% in 1998.
-The last passenger on a flight provides essentially the entire profit on that flight.
-Larger teams slow processes, develop larger forecasting errors, hamper co-ordination, increase conflicts, and diminish motivation. The ideal team size is two.
-Peppermint (the scent, not the candy) enhances attention, alertness, memory and mood.
-Mimicking a customer's speech pattern and behavior increases sales and impression of the whole store.

And last but probably most relevant: Reading too much useless information makes people 46% less likely to think clearly. People cannot perceive the extent of the uselessness of the information they read.

David Wineberg
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Fun Facts 21 Dec 2013
By spsanders - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A book full of curiosities and can help provide one upmanship at the water cooler. It's a quick read but doesn't stick.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Really funny!! 16 Nov 2013
By picachu - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I purchased two of this books, because I consider it a very good small present for this Christmas.
It is a little book that you can use during short travels.
You will find a lot of fun, with amazing discoveries.
Reading is easy, is not scientific language, and many of the tips could be usefull for real management.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Small but interesting book 27 Oct 2013
By Margot Wetzel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I keep this book on my desk at work and lots of people like to come in and just read a couple of page. Makes me feel like people actually like me. It's on the smaller side so don't expect a huge normal size book but it does the trick. Anytime I need a boost in my life, I just have to pick it up and start reading it and suddenly I feel smarter!
Fun, Quick Read 2 July 2014
By bronx book nerd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book is an amalgamation of a wide variety of statistical findings across various categories. They are for the most part interesting and motivate curiosity and further study. There are a total of 160 or so such snippets like "whites have benefited more from pay for performance jobs" to "flattering the boss can set him up for a fall" to "why women pay more for mortgages: they don't shop". Each entry is just a short paragraph which begins with an introduction of the finding that includes mention of the academics and the universities involved. This is followed by a very quick mention of the correlation and usually by an explanation. The explanations are not always convincing; in fact, a couple of the snippets suggest that the reader should take a lot of what's included with a grain of salt. One snippet says that absorbing data this way makes one stupid; another says that you using statistics you can come up with all kinds of correlations. Another example of this are the two findings that contradict each other. In any case, a serious reader should take something they are interested in and dig deeper into the original research and find possibly other research that may support or contradict the finding presented. Still, in this very short format, the book does provide some entertaining information and food for thought.
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