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Stars and Stripes Forever CD


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Product details

  • Orchestra: Cleveland Winds
  • Conductor: Frederick Fennell
  • Composer: Leo Arnaud, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Percy Grainger, John Philip Sousa
  • Audio CD (18 Dec 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Telarc
  • ASIN: B000003CTD
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 209,199 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Olympic Theme
2. La Chasse
3. Olympiad
4. Commando March
5. Belgian Paratroopers
6. Florentiner, Op. 214
7. Barnum And Bailey's Favorite
8. Anchors Aweigh
9. Radetzky March
10. Sea Songs
11. The Stars And Stripes Forever
12. March: Seventeen Come Sunday
13. Intermezzo: My Bonny Boy
14. March: Folk Songs from Somerset
15. Lisbon Bay
16. Horkstow Grange
17. Rufford Park Poachers
18. The Brisk Young Sailor
19. Lord Melbourne
20. The Lost Lady Found
See all 21 tracks on this disc

Product Description

Fennell,Frederick ~ Stars & Stripes/Marches & More

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bob Zeidler on 16 Aug 2004
Format: Audio CD
This being the month of the 2004 Summer Olympic Games in Athens, not too surprisingly, the "appropriate music..." alluded to above are the Three Fanfares by Leo Arnaud (b. Lyon, France 1904; d. Hollywood, CA 1991). The first two fanfares ("Olympic Theme"; "La Chasse") were originally written in 1959. At the time, the first fanfare had no specific name; the two fanfares together were simply called "Bugler's Dream." It was nearly a decade later (1968) that ABC-TV adopted the first fanfare for the '68 Olympic Games (and then for "Wide World of Sport"); then the "Olympic Theme" name stuck. Permanently. So, all the Olympics watchers in the U.S. can expect to OD on the theme, whether they like it or not. (Interestingly, in cruising a few classical music message boards during these Olympic times, I find that all too often people attribute this "Olympic Theme" to John Williams. Not so!)
Well, so much for the "preliminaries for the Olympic occasion." The Cleveland Symphonic Winds under Fred Fennell play these three brief works for all they're worth, even to restoring the French horn responses to the trumpet calls in the second part of "Olympic Theme." These French horn parts were-and are-so difficult that the ABC-TV version, from, obviously, a different and earlier recording, had them replaced by trumpets.
My main reason for acquiring this CD when it first came out two decades ago was not Olympian in the slightest. In short, it was because Fennell reprises three wind ensemble classics that he had done many years earlier, with the Eastman Wind Ensemble on the Mercury Living Presence label. These three are Sam Barber's "Commando March," Ralph Vaughan Williams's "Folk Song Suite," and Percy Grainger's "Lincolnshire Posy.
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By Andrew C. Mitchell TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 7 Sep 2009
Format: Audio CD
This is the CD to turn up the volume and listen to the glory of metal and wood with percussion which is the great Cleveland Symphonic Wind sound or to put through your headphones to avoid blasting out the neighbours. This CD has a magnificent width of music visited - for these seated musicians - from dazzling fanfares to marches for commandos, paratroopers, US Naval Academy, Royal Military School of Music, the 86th Hungarian Infantry regiment and then the circus- Barnum and Baileys Favourite. There are tunes that I will sing throughout the day. And beyond these things, there are other Wind Band Spectaculars including works of J Strauss I, Sousa, and Ralph Vaughan Williams. The links are made in the fascinating sleeve notes by the conductor Frederick Fennell. The CD culminates in works by bandsman Percy Grainger, a fantastic musical genius,on this occasion stretching the wind band to its limits with 'different' sonorities and rhythms. The Lincolnshire Posy is based on folk music that he had collected many years before he worked this magic upon them. And to finish there is the 'Shepherd's Hey'....... Give it a blast.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By I. Giles HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 16 Dec 2013
Format: Audio CD
This disc, vividly recorded in 1978 and 1979 on digital recorders, is an artistic and musical triumph. The repertoire is right up Fennel's street and on this disc provides a nicely balanced concert so that it can be played all the way through without fatigue. As such it is a preferable disc to the Mercury discs of Sousa marches, fine though they are.

I have noted how many writers have enthused about the opening Leo Arnaud fanfares. However, for my own personal taste, the real pleasure starts with the well chosen selection of marches by Barber, Leemans, Fucik, King, Zimmermann, Strauss and Sousa. Straight away, simply by observing that list of names, one is instantly aware of the considerable variety possible within such a limited construct as a march. The reality lives up to the promise.

The marches then give way to classic wind band extended pieces of an altogether different nature consisting of the Sea Songs and Folk Song Suite by Vaughan Williams and the Lincolnshire Posy set and Shepherd's Hey by that ear-tweaking maverick, Percy Grainger.

Throughout the playing is absolute perfection and the recording does it full justice.

This is a disc that crosses the boundaries and I would suggest that it would give pleasure to all sorts of listeners who would not normally respond to music outside their own chosen genres.
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By Lucas on 10 Jun 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The crystal clear Telarc recording (as far back as 1978) reveals phenomenal playing by the brass and woodwind. The DSD version (SACD-60639) is even clearer but at the cost of perhaps sounding a little harsh (this could also be described as a very neutral sound).
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 24 reviews
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Some appropriate music for August, 2004. And other goodies. 16 Aug 2004
By Bob Zeidler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This being the month of the 2004 Summer Olympic Games in Athens, not too surprisingly, the "...appropriate music..." alluded to above are the Three Fanfares by Leo Arnaud (b. Lyon, France 1904; d. Hollywood, CA 1991). The first two fanfares ("Olympic Theme"; "La Chasse") were originally written in 1959. At the time, the first fanfare had no specific name; the two fanfares together were simply called "Bugler's Dream." It was nearly a decade later (1968) that ABC-TV adopted the first fanfare for the '68 Olympic Games (and then for "Wide World of Sports"); then the "Olympic Theme" name stuck. Permanently. So, all the Olympics watchers in the U.S. can expect to OD on the theme, whether they like it or not. (Interestingly, in cruising a few classical music message boards during these Olympic times, I find that all too often people attribute this "Olympic Theme" to John Williams. Not so!)

Well, so much for the "preliminaries for the Olympic occasion." The Cleveland Symphonic Winds under Fred Fennell play these three brief works for all they're worth, even to restoring the French horn responses to the trumpet calls in the second part of "Olympic Theme." These French horn parts were-and are-so difficult that the ABC-TV version, from, obviously, a different and earlier recording, had them replaced by trumpets.

My main reason for acquiring this album when it first came out two decades ago was not Olympian in the slightest. In short, it was because Fennell reprises three wind ensemble classics that he had done many years earlier, with the Eastman Wind Ensemble on the Mercury Living Presence label. These three are Sam Barber's "Commando March," Ralph Vaughan Williams's "Folk Song Suite," and Percy Grainger's "Lincolnshire Posy." All three are classics for the wind ensemble, and I can envision tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of former wind ensemble players who "passed this way" in high school and college. I certainly did, and remember these works with great fondness (along with many other wind ensemble "classics" that Fennell has conducted over a long and illustrious career).

The Eastman band was never ever a slouch in performing this type of music. (In fact, it was the model for the repertoire.) But the Cleveland Symphonic Winds (essentially, the Cleveland Orchestra minus the strings, but beefed up where sections require more instrumentalists, plus cornets, saxophones and baritone horns not normally found in orchestras) is on another, higher, plateau entirely. This is most evident in the Grainger work, which is a true masterpiece of the repertoire, with some highly original parts writing that provides intriguing sonorities not normally associated with "band" music.

All three-the Barber, Grainger and Vaughan Williams works-come off noticeably better on this Telarc release than they did years ago (MANY years ago in the case of the Barber work) when Fennell led the Eastman Wind Ensemble. In terms of sonics, it isn't even close: as might be expected, the Telarc sound is still state-of-the-art after two decades.

The balance of the album is mostly fillers of marches from the U.S. and Europe. (The album title is somewhat of a misnomer, given its contents, including the Grainger and Vaughan Williams pieces.) A few marches are well-known; a few are obscure. All are as well-played as the pieces I've commented about in some detail.

At just a little under an hour, this is not necessarily high value, but it was typical for "early" CDs, as this one is. To me, it is worth it for the superb job on the Grainger work. To others, perhaps the three Arnaud fanfares will fill the bill. For the next few weeks, anyway. :-)

Bob Zeidler
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A Phenomenal Collection of Band Classics 11 Jan 2011
By Jim Kelsey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Frederick Fennell's "Stars and Stripes" is a must for any band director, not to mention enjoyable listening for anyone. This CD was recorded by Frederick Fennell (1914-2004) and the Cleveland Symphonic Winds on December 3, 1978 and November 18, 1979. Fennell was one of the early pioneers of band recordings and helped to establish music that has become the staple of university and professional bands worldwide. His legacy as a conductor and author will be long remembered.

The music was recorded DDD, which, until I read the liner notes was unaware that the music industry was recording digitally in the late 1970's. The quality is very clear, as is the balance between sections. The performances are spectacular, crisp, and every much as exciting as any of Fennell's earlier recordings. The tracks are the staple of the band library: Samuel Barber's "Commando March," Leeman's "Belgian Paratroopers," Vaughan Williams "Sea Songs" and "English Folk Song Suite," and Grainger's "Lincolnshire Posy," not to mention marches by Fucik, King and Sousa.

I've used this CD many times as a listening example for my students many, many times over the past fifteen years that I've owned it. For me, it was a very, worthwhile investment and if you enjoy/study/listen to band music, I believe you'll feel the same.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Simple to sum up! 21 Feb 2002
By Mark A Framness - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a simple one to sum up.
If this CD does not bring a smile to your face, then you are DEAD and nothing ever more will make you smile.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Excellent musicianship throughout 16 Jan 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I enjoyed this CD very much, but I was somewhat puzzled by some of the music choices in relation to the title. With a title like 'Stars & Stripes' I would expect to hear American marches and other patriotic music. Instead, there is a mix of American and European marches and fanfares, along with well-loved selections by Grainger and Vaughn Williams. I adore 'Lincolnshire Posy', having played it in college, and this rendition is done very well. I'm just not sure how it fits in with the rest of the album.
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Great wind band music 29 April 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Yes, the title is a bit misleading: this disc goes beyond the familiar to include some attractive rarities. Recorded in terrific Telarc sound, these virtuosic players open with the Olympic theme made famous by ABC's 1968 TV coverage of the Olympics, followed by two other olympic themes written in a similar style. The Barber and Leemans pieces are also beautiful rarities, the Barber sounding quite cultured for a military march. The handsome Florentiner March by Fucik is one of my favorites on the disc. The other pieces will sound instantly familiar to most people; the "Barnum and Bailey's Favorite" by Karl King surely will be a hit with circus goers and "Anchors Aweigh" with sea farers. The glorious Vaughan Williams and Grainger works are less martial and, written by non-Americans, prove beyond a doubt that this disc about more than stars-and-stripes flag waving.
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