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  • Star Trek The Next Generation - Vol. 3.1 - Evolution / The Ensigns of Command / The Survivors [VHS] [1990]
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Star Trek The Next Generation - Vol. 3.1 - Evolution / The Ensigns of Command / The Survivors [VHS] [1990]


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Product details

  • Actors: Patrick Stewart, Brent Spiner, Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Marina Sirtis
  • Writers: Gene Roddenberry
  • Language: English, French
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: Paramount
  • VHS Release Date: 28 Feb. 2000
  • Run Time: 132 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004RCMM
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 334,339 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Opening three episodes from the third series of the second 'Star Trek' spin-off. In 'Evolution', Wes Crusher's experiments lead to the Enterprise's computer systems being overrun by intelligent micro-organisms, placing the entire crew in danger. 'The Ensigns of Command' sees Data's ability to cope with stress put to the test when, on his first command mission, he has to cope with the demands of an alien race that human colonists leave their planet. In 'The Survivors', an elderly couple are all that remain of a 11,000-strong Earth colony which, they claim, has been attacked by aliens. Can Riker believe their story?

From Amazon.co.uk

In 1987, some 20 years after the original series had ended, Star Trek: The Next Generation was launched into a decade renowned for its materialistic greed, but also for its hesitant steps towards a more unified world order. Creator Gene Roddenberry revised his vision of humanity's future accordingly, shifting the Trek timeline 80 years on and reinventing the new Starship Enterprise as an Ark-like exploration vessel full of families, schools, soothing recreational facilities and a maternally pacifying computer voice (Roddenberry's wife, Majel Barrett). The Next Generation crew were not soldiers, but scientists and diplomats. Unlike the fiercely individualistic Captain Kirk, Patrick Stewart's patrician Captain Jean-Luc Picard was a model team leader: no matter how desperate the crisis, he ensured that everyone got to sit round the Conference Room table and talk it over. And in a true late-1980s touch, a key member of the Bridge crew was psychoanalyst Counsellor Troi, always on hand to discuss everyone's feelings.

Season Two saw the welcome introduction of the cybernetic horror that was the Borg. Originally a powerful symbol of technological misuse in an otherwise technologically utopian universe, ultimately their hive-like existence served to reinforce the message that everyone would be much happier as a team player. Even renegade super-entity Q (John De Lancie) relied on Picard as much as his fellow god-like playmates; Data followed Pinocchio and Spock in a quest to discard what made him an individual; and there was even an episode that rationalised why all aliens basically looked alike (we're all one big family). Even the slogan change to "Where no one has gone before" acknowledges that there's no "one" in a team. But for all its earnest political correctness and an over-reliance on "technobabble", good stories played by an appealing ensemble cast were at the heart of the show's success. After seven successful seasons, "All Good Things" finally came to an end. Until Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise, that is. --Paul Tonks


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115 of 117 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Aug. 2003
Format: DVD
In case there was any doubt, this 6-disc DVD box set contains all ten TV Movies produced as part of the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" series. They are not to be confused with the theatrical films "Generations" through "Nemesis". In each case, these are two episodes from the TV series (often a season cliffhanger and its resolution) presented in their "feature length" format, which means they are edited together as one 88 minute show with no "To Be Continued..." legend and no end credits separating parts I and II. These were also produced in this format on individual VHS cassettes long ago.
This set will therefore give a fine summary of The Next Generation's seven years, from the pilot to the series finale, for those who do not wish the expense of all seven season boxsets. They are, however, all the big action spectacles without the low-key cerebral stand-alones.
Notable highlights include the acclaimed "Best of Both Worlds" with the ultimate Borg invasion leading to the greatest of the show's cliffhangers - Captain Picard's assimilation and attack on the Enterprise. Also worthy of mention is the appearance of Ambassador Spock on Romulus as one of several original series corss-overs in "Unification", Picard's interrogation by Cardassians in a fine turn for actor Patrick Stewart in "Chain of Command", and of course the outstanding journey through the past, present and future in the climactic finale "All Good Things...".
However, there are a few that do not quite live up to these high standards with "Time's Arrow" as an unsatisfying if amusing adventure to 19th Century Earth, and "Birthright" as a rather slow paced, uneven mix of Worf and Data character stories that could have been condensed to a single episode.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Oct. 2001
Format: VHS Tape
"SUDDENLY HUMAN" puts Captain Picard in a position that he has never felt comfortable in, yet the veteran captain still succeeds in his mission.
After finding the wreckage of a Talarian vessel, the crew discover a human teenage boy on the ship, Jono. Jono has been living with the Talarians since he was a child and does not want to be kept on the Enterprise. The crew learn that Jono's real name is Jeremiah Rossa, and that his grandmother is Admiral Connaught Rossa. Despite Picard's uncomfortable nature around children, he decides to take Jono under his wing and teach him about human life...he even goes as far as to allow Jono to stay with Picard in his quarters. This action proves near-fatal as Jono stabs Picard during the night. Jono's "father" comes looking for him, but Picard feels that Jono should be returned home to his grandmother where he belongs. This displeases Jono and he threatens the crew. Picard eventually realizes that Jono has the right to choose where he wants to live.
The reason I enjoyed this particular episode was because I got to learn that it's important to respect other people's choices, even if it's a bad choice.
After reading the preview of "LEGACY", I was keen to compare Ishara Yar with her sister, Tasha, when I got to see the episode. There was definitely a resemblance between the two. The Yars came from a colony on Turkana IV where constant fighting between the two factions was a fact of life. Due to these circumstances, these two girls became warriors themselves, learning to fight to the end for their cause. Unfortunately, Ishara's cause was one of hate. Tasha was killed in "Skin of Evil" three years earlier.
The Enterprise enters orbit around Turkana IV to rescue two Starfleet crewmen who have crashed landed on the planet.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steven Hill on 3 Nov. 2003
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
0674 of 1000 arrived today. Early.
My office-mates watched wide eyed as I removed the Borg Cube from its packaging.
This has to be the best boxed set ever. There are not enough superlatives to describe it.
Having seen almost every episode, I am looking forward to watching them again, and filling in any blanks!
I see already there are cubes up for auction... Tsk. This is a collectors item, for geeks and trekkies to enjoy for years to come. Hordes of aliens could not part me from this collection!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lorrie on 11 Feb. 2002
Format: VHS Tape
Season Two of The Next Generation really shines with these episodes in a collection. In true Generation style, we deal with Time Warping, Klingons, and Alien troubles.
"Time Squared" starts us off, with a great episode involving the definate impending destruction of the Enterprise.
While travelling through space, the Enterprise picks up an unpowered shuttlecraft. Within, they are all amazed to find an unconsious Captain Picard, whom they all just left on the bridge, but even he comes to see for himself (I hope he was paid double his salary). The craft's logs are recovered, and the crew witnessess their destruction from the view of the shuttle craft that has come from only six hours into the future!
This episode is what The Next Generation is all about, Time, Space, and everything within. Travelling through space, coming across a shuttle craft from the future, becoming trapped in a space fluctuation (front cover), it still somehow manages to seem real...
"The Icarus Factor" is heavilly based upon both William Riker and Commander Worf. At a space station, the Enterprise picks up a guest: Riker's father, whom he hasn't seen in fifteen years. Unwilling to patch things up, Riker usually tries to avoid his father. Meanwhile, Worf is celebrating the tenth anniversary of his Age of Ascension, so his friends set up a traditional Klingon area in the holodeck with startling results.
This episode deals greatly with family values, without leaving the good space theme of Star Trek. It is one of those episodes which you can just watch without needing any previous knowledge of Star Trek, just an enjoyable experience.
"Pen Pals" features Data again, who becomes the main star of the episode.
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