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  • Stanley Bate Symphony No 3; Erik Chisholm Pictures from Dante; Arnell Robert Flaherty
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Stanley Bate Symphony No 3; Erik Chisholm Pictures from Dante; Arnell Robert Flaherty Classical


Price: £11.74 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Stanley Bate Symphony No 3; Erik Chisholm Pictures from Dante; Arnell Robert Flaherty + Bate: Concerto for Viola & Orchestra / Vaughan Williams: Romance / Bell: Rosa Mystica + Bate: Symphony No.4 / Arnell: Symphony No.7 Mandela
Price For All Three: £44.63

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Product details

  • Orchestra: Rsno
  • Conductor: Martin Yates
  • Composer: Stanley Bate, Richard Arnell, Erik Chisholm
  • Audio CD (9 Jan. 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Classical
  • Label: Dutton Epoch
  • ASIN: B002VPR7HQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 147,604 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Symphony No. 3
2. Prelude, 'Black Mountain', Op. 46
3. Robert Flaherty: Impression, Op. 87
4. Pictures from Dante

Product Description

Dutton Epoch presents two outstanding world premiere recordings, which listeners have been requesting for some time - Stanley Bate's coruscating wartime Third Symphony, and Vaughan Williams's powerful early Heroic Elegy and Triumphal Epilogue. Both works are quite a find and Dutton Epoch has coupled each with revelatory supporting programmes. If you like Vaughan Williams or Walton you will revel in Stanley Bate's lyrical and dramatic symphony commandingly played by the Royal Scottish National Orchestra conducted by Martin Yates. With it on this disc comes Erik Chisholm's grandly impressive and colourful tone poem Pictures from Dante, possibly Chisholm's greatest work, a brilliant orchestral study in two movements with resonances of Ravel, Holst and Celtic tradition. The disc is completed with the ninth contribution to Dutton Epoch's celebrated series of Richard Arnell's music, with Arnell's two vivid tributes to the filmmaker Robert Flaherty - the prelude The Black Mountain and the extended tone poem or 'Impression' Robert Flaherty, in which Arnell, in some of his most romantic writing, reflects the Hollywood music of his time.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Steve TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Nov. 2009
For some years now the Dutton label has been releasing new recordings of British classical music otherwise ignored by the record industry. Certainly the large companies such as EMI and Decca (Universal) long ago gave up recording the likes of Rawsthorne, Alwyn, Bantock et al. Even Delius rarely gets a look in. Thankfully there are a number of independents such as Hyperion, Chandos and Dutton (and, to be fair, Naxos) which have far surpassed the multinationals in importance for anyone with an interest in British music.

This CD brings together works by three composers who have largely been overlooked by the British music establishment. And they are all fine works; it is shocking that they have been ignored for so long.

The Third Symphony of Stanley Bate was written in 1940. The composer, like a surprising number of others, found himself in the United States (trying to get to Australia with his wife initially). The influence of the war in Europe is evident from the opening of the symphony; there is a good deal of anger expressed. There are hints of Vaughan Williams (one of Bate's teachers), and, I think, Shostakovich. The short middle movement is relatively peaceful but the final third movement brings the work back to a violent end. This is, however, all very listenable music. The symphony lasts about thirty minutes and doesn't outstay its time at all. Bate has a style very much his own, with vivid orchestration, despite the inevitable influences of others. I have already been back to replay this work.

The second composer featured is Richard Arnell. The Dutton label has served him particularly well, recording all the symphonies and many other orchestral works. The works here are 'Prelude "Black Mountain"' and 'Robert Flaherty - Impression'.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Davis VINE VOICE on 22 Nov. 2009
This has to be one of the best Dutton releases of all time. Having been bowled over by Stanley Bate's Viola Concerto on an earlier Dutton release I eagerly awaited the possibility of them issuing his Symphony No 3, which I had heard was his masterpiece - and here it is! Bate's Symphony No 3 is a troubled, stormy, lyrical work - very much of its time (1940). I think that the influence of Bate's teacher Vaughan Williams is more assimilated than in the wonderful Viola Concerto (actually a later work), but it has a great VW type second subject in the first movement which once heard, stays in the mind long afterwards (like the big tune in the first movement of Vaughan Williams's later 6th Symphony). This is a searching and poetic score and I am not surprised that it made a great impression when it was first performed in the 1950s. Oddly enough the opening of the last movement reminded me momentarily of the contemporary Japanese composer Yoshimatsu. Sadly Bate suffered critical rejection, especially it seems by the BBC, and he died prematurely in 1959. Now, I hope that Dutton will go on to record Bates' Fourth Symphony of 1955.

The CD is a must buy for all British music fans for the Bate alone but its companions on disc are also fine scores. Richard Arnell's 'Prelude, Black Mountain' is an epic score in under three minutes! Arnell was just as undeservedly neglected as Bate and his symphonies 3-5 on Dutton were great discoveries for me.

Finally Scottish composer Erik Chisholm's 'Pictures from Dante' (after Dore's Illustrations to 'The Divine Comedy') plunge us headlong into the nightmare world of Dante's 'Inferno'. The despairing and catastrophic opening of the work is wonderfully intimidating (even more so than the opening of Khachaturian's Second Symphony 'The Bell').
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By David Layland on 6 April 2010
This is a superb disc from start to finish. I can only agree with everything in the previous excellent and comprehensive reviews.
Full marks must go to Dutton for the work they are doing with British music.
I can't wait to discover more!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Nobody TOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 July 2012
Verified Purchase
A couple of years ago I purchased a Dorian recording of Villa-Lobos' fourth Symphony, coupled with his steamy tone poem "Amazonas". The recording boasted state of the art engineering but I was disappointed. No detail was lost but the sound was flat and harsh: a bit clinical with a lack of bass umph. I turned to CPO for salvation with the symphony: now here is a woefully neglected symphonist (you don't have to be anglo saxon/germanic composer with a penchant for thematic double entry bookkeeping to write a good one). "Amazonas" I replaced with a less well recorded but more atmospheric Marco Polo recording.

What was the point of me telling you all that? Firstly I discovered a fine and neglected symphonist from further south than Vienna (Alfredo Casella's Third or those by Braga Santos) and secondly the finest recording methods don't always deliver results. That's how I feel listening to this Dutton recording where the sound is clear but unsympathetic to the orchestra, rather treble biased with little bass or any spacious sound stage. I was disappointed with the Arnell Symphonies, though the Third I still was able to appreciate, but this was down as much to the recording a than the pieces themselves It's such a pity because all involved had the very noblest intentions.

Here the same has happened. It's particularly true for Bate's passionate but tautly structured Third Symphony. The sound was so flat and unfocussed - particularly unflattering to the brass. What we have is a fine three movement symphony that doesn't out stay its welcome. Bate's teacher, Vaughan Williams, can be heard alongside an undoubted Shostakovich influence, particularly inth emiddle slow movement flute and high string sections.
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