Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

See Wishlist
Stanford: Symphonies, Vol. 3 (Nos. 3 and 6)
 
See larger image
 

Stanford: Symphonies, Vol. 3 (Nos. 3 and 6)

27 May 2008 | Format: MP3

£4.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £6.04 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Sąrl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
8:10
30
2
14:00
30
3
4:48
30
4
10:27
30
5
12:28
30
6
6:56
30
7
11:56
30
8
11:15


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 May 2008
  • Label: Naxos
  • Copyright: (C) 2008 Naxos
  • Total Length: 1:20:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001LYPW52
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 78,765 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Albion on 8 May 2008
Format: Audio CD
The Naxos survey of the seven symphonies of Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924) goes from strength to strength. This latest release pairs the Irish composer's best-known symphony, 'The Irish', with his least-known, the sixth. In particular this disc fully vindicates Stanford's own opinion which favoured the sixth above all his other symphonies.

Written in 1905 to commemorate the life and work of the artist George Frederic Watts (1817-1904), the sixth is at last revealed as a work of enormous power and accomplishment with perhaps the most gorgeous slow movement that Stanford (or indeed, any other British composer) ever penned. Throughout the work, Stanford's melodic invention is genuinely inspired (not always the case in his enormously prolific output), whilst the ingenuity and richness of the orchestration are a revelation.

Although not mentioned in the otherwise excellent booklet notes, themes in the sixth symphony are related to paintings or sculptures by Watts: in the first movement (a tremendous rush of dynamic propulsion) we are hearing the musical equivalent of the great equestrian statue 'Physical Energy'. Other themes used throughout the work are linked to the paintings 'Love and Life' and 'Love and Death' whilst the trio of the Scherzo is inspired by the whimsical painting of an angling cupid 'Good luck to your fishing'.

This new performance by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra under David Lloyd-Jones makes an even stronger case for the work than did Vernon Handley and the Ulster Orchestra (on a nevertheless very fine Chandos disc).
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By op on 2 April 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I too must echo the sentiments expressed above. Stanford has received a bad press - I could say that he has been the victim of a savage one. It's well known that he was over-prolific and could write his ideas straight into full score, standing on his head, and I suppose this has created an assumption that he simply churned out masses of colourless mediocrity. His reputation has perhaps also been damaged by his vast output of finely-crafted, but often dull, church music.
My own awakening to Stanford's music has spanned forty years, necessarily so because it has only started to become more widely available over the past twenty. I remember hearing a rare performance of some of his piano music in the sixties and thinking that the criticism was well founded. But then I heard an equally rare performance of a string quartet of his, and I was spellbound by the Irishness and originality of the music - which I cannot remember now. I remember reading that Stanford, on hearing Rachmaninov's second piano concerto, came home and wrote one just like it. Yet when I heard Stanford's second piano concerto, I was amazed, not by how similar it was, but how different.
An artist should be judged by his finest work, and it seems that Stanford has too long been judged on hearsay.
There is plenty of fine work on this disc. I agree that the sixth symphony is the finer of the two (I also like the fourth). Both are characterful, colourful, finely orchestrated, and Stanford's unique voice comes through. Oh yes, Stanford has his own voice, and it's sometimes fitful, but it's there all the same.
If you like this disc, there are the other five symphonies, the second piano concerto, second violin concerto, clarinet concerto, Irish rhapsodies, Requiem, Stabat Mater, and a host of smaller things to explore. Perhaps the tide is at last turning for Stanford. I hope so.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Guy Whit on 18 Jun 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The bad press received by Stanford, referred to by another reviewer here, is largely deserved in my opinion. There are whole passages in the 'Irish' that come straight from Brahms and the square-faced, academic dryness can be irksome. The 6th Symphony, however, is much more original, with a melting slow movement and lots of spirited writing in the the rest. It's odd then that it is largely forgotten - it has an individuality largely absent from the other six symphonies. They are all, of course, expertly written and well orchestrated; it's just that they don't have the imprint of originality and sharpness of focus (they are all overlong for their material). Hubert Parry, Stanford's contemporary, is much more inspired and I'd urge people to try out his symphonies.

The performances here, however, are rock solid and David Lloyd-Jones certainly has the measure of this well-crafted if sometimes stolid music. Just to repeat though - the 6th is very interesting and well worth investigating. At the price, you have nothing to lose.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tomfrom66 on 15 May 2008
Format: Audio CD
I write merely to agree with other reviewer, and to urge you to hear Stanford's Sixth Symphony, which is surely a victim of totally unwarranted neglect.

Performance and recording are fully up to expectation.

Please do not hesitate.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again