or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a 0.25 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Stalinist Values: The Cultural Norms of Soviet Modernity, 1917-1941 [Paperback]

David L. Hoffmann
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: 12.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 29 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover 37.95  
Paperback 12.50  
Trade In this Item for up to 0.25
Trade in Stalinist Values: The Cultural Norms of Soviet Modernity, 1917-1941 for an Amazon Gift Card of up to 0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Frequently Bought Together

Stalinist Values: The Cultural Norms of Soviet Modernity, 1917-1941 + Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s
Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press (22 May 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801488214
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801488214
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 16 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 939,512 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Synopsis

Soviet official culture underwent a dramatic shift in the mid-1930s, when Stalin and his fellow leaders began to promote conventional norms, patriarchal families, tsarist heroes and Russian literary classics. For Leon Trotsky - and many later commentators - this apparent embrace of bourgeois values marked a betrayal of the October Revolution and a retreat from socialism. David L. Hoffmann argues that, far from reversing direction, the Stalinist leadership remained committed to remaking both individuals and society - and used selected elements of traditional culture to bolster the socialist order. Melding original archival research with new scholarship in the field, Hoffmann describes Soviet cultural and behavioural norms in such areas as leisure activities, social hygiene, family life and sexuality. He demonstrates that the Soviet state's campaign to effect social improvement by intervening in the lives of its citizens was not unique but echoed the efforts of other European governments, both fascist and liberal, in the interwar period.

Indeed, in Europe, America and Stalin's Russia, governments sought to inculcate many of the same values - from order and efficiency to sobriety and literacy. For Hoffmann, what remains distinctive about the Soviet case is the collectivist orientation of official culture and the degree of coercion the state applied to pursue its goals.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
 Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
David Hoffmann's book "Stalinist Values" discusses a widely noticed but not often fully analyzed phenomenon in Soviet history: the shift away from avant-garde, progressive socio-cultural values to traditionalist cultural conservatism in the 1930s. For many opponents of Stalin and his government on the left this has been seen as one of the proofs for Stalin's alleged betrayal of real socialism; for some rightist critics, of whom Hoffmann interestingly cites some examples, this has been interpreted as a necessary and obvious move away from untenable avant-gardism. But the shift itself has not been much analyzed from the point of view of Stalin c.s. themselves, and that is particularly what this book is about.

Hoffmann's thesis is that the conservative turn (to coin a phrase) should not be read as a move away from socialism, because the people involved did not perceive it as such. The book studies all the different fields in which the shift presented itself noticably, from family relations and sexuality to artistic and literary endeavours, and in each case Hoffmann tries to show that the Soviet leadership saw their move as one consolidating the reality of socialism rather than a move away from it. His thesis rests strongly on the fact that Stalin declared in the early 1930s that 'socialism had been achieved'. This implied that where before this period avant-gardism, strongly progressive social reforms and general anti-authoritarianism in social relations were positive for socialism and warranted, from the moment of socialism being 'achieved' on this was no longer the case. Any kind of conservatism would now not be a conservatism maintaining capitalist relations, but a conservatism maintaining socialist relations stably as they were, and therefore now a good thing.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An analysis of the 'conservative turn' under Stalin 16 Aug 2010
By M. A. Krul - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
David Hoffmann's book "Stalinist Values" discusses a widely noticed but not often fully analyzed phenomenon in Soviet history: the shift away from avant-garde, progressive socio-cultural values to traditionalist cultural conservatism in the 1930s. For many opponents of Stalin and his government on the left this has been seen as one of the proofs for Stalin's alleged betrayal of real socialism; for some rightist critics, of whom Hoffmann interestingly cites some examples, this has been interpreted as a necessary and obvious move away from untenable avant-gardism. But the shift itself has not been much analyzed from the point of view of Stalin c.s. themselves, and that is particularly what this book is about.

Hoffmann's thesis is that the conservative turn (to coin a phrase) should not be read as a move away from socialism, because the people involved did not perceive it as such. The book studies all the different fields in which the shift presented itself noticably, from family relations and sexuality to artistic and literary endeavours, and in each case Hoffmann tries to show that the Soviet leadership saw their move as one consolidating the reality of socialism rather than a move away from it. His thesis rests strongly on the fact that Stalin declared in the early 1930s that 'socialism had been achieved'. This implied that where before this period avant-gardism, strongly progressive social reforms and general anti-authoritarianism in social relations were positive for socialism and warranted, from the moment of socialism being 'achieved' on this was no longer the case. Any kind of conservatism would now not be a conservatism maintaining capitalist relations, but a conservatism maintaining socialist relations stably as they were, and therefore now a good thing. Accordingly, things that were perceived as tending to individualize people and undermine unity and stability were now a bad thing. This, according to Hoffmann, explains how the Soviet leadership could re-ban homosexuality and abortion, implement strong restrictions and guidelines on artistic expression, and so on, without seeing this in any way as contradictory to socialist goals (although even at the time many did).

The author strengthens his case by re-interpreting some other events from the period through the same lens. He sees the massive deportations of 'suspect' ethniticies as well as class enemies not just as part of war preparations against fascism (the usual view) but also as strengthening the fabric and unity of the now already socialist state. The great purges, too, are interpreted this way, in particular since they fell strongest on minority ethnicities and on people considered to be failing in aspects other than the political (morally and culturally). Hoffmann also pays all the deserved attention to the other side of the coin, namely the fierce campaigns by the Soviet government to install 'culture' into its hitherto backward rural peoples - by means of literacy campaigns, preventing them from spitting on the floor everywhere, teaching hygiene and good manners, proper dress, and so forth. In the fields of literacy, basic preventative healthcare and the like the Soviet state achieved immense improvements, and Hoffmann is not too critical to give them the deserved credit for it, although he points out how the authoritarianism of these campaigns is linked to their negative counterpart in purges and repressions.

The thesis is a strong and interesting one. Its main flaw is that Hoffmann does not really analyze or contextualize the central concept itself, namely Stalin's idea of having 'achieved socialism' in the early 1930s. Based merely on the works of Marx and Engels, or even those of Lenin, this is a very odd claim indeed and if it played ao central a role in Soviet policy shifts as Hoffmann makes it seem, it deserves more thorough political and historical scrutiny. Moreover, there are a couple counter-examples that the author mentions himself; for example, Lenin himself and many others close to him in governing circles disapproved of the avant-gardist tendencies in art and probably of many sexual and family reforms too, as has been shown in Richard Stites' fantastic work on the Soviet values of the 1920s (Revolutionary Dreams: Utopian Vision and Experimental Life in the Russian Revolution). Yet, they did not implement prohibitions on this nor did they seriously attempt to politically repress them, since they generally seemed to see this as part of the socialist transformation, even if sometimes distasteful or unnecessary. This fact works somewhat in favor of the 'Stalinist betrayal' school. Also, Hoffmann cannot explain entirely why the Stalin government of the 1930s did keep some of the social reforms, such as relatively extremely liberal divorce laws and a commitment (not always fulfilled in practice) to female participation in the labor force. Finally, the book puts some of the 1930s 'reversals' into a comparative context, showing that other European nations, fascist and liberal, were implementing many of the same restrictions and pro-natalist policies during the same period and much for the same reasons. It is an excellent and long overdue thing to place such controversial subjects of Soviet history into a larger comparative context, and Hoffmann should be praised for doing so, but it also to some extent undermines his case that the reversals were due to a very Soviet Union-specific political shift (the 'achievement of socialism').

Nonetheless, the book is an important contribution toward understanding Stalinism and the extremely important interbellum period in the USSR generally, and it is recommmended reading for people interested in Soviet history.
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Academic, dry, but interesting nonetheless 30 Aug 2003
By Edward G. Nilges - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
New access to Soviet archives have enriched the picture of daily life in the 1930s in Russia, and this book shows how Stalin and the Soviet elite reverted to more conservative artistic and social norms in a unique fashion.
Leon Trotsky thought that Stalin was "Thermidorean" like the French middle-class revolutionaries who defused the extremes of Robespierre and St-Just.
This book shows instead that Stalin maintained Bolshevik radicalism while culturally transforming Russia into what it was under Leonid Brezhnev: a socialist society, with top-down control tempered by growing incompetence, run by the equivalent of American building superintendants, iron workers, and hard-hats.
Those guys did not like artistic or sexual experimentation much and their values were patriarchal.
What's interesting was that in the short-term, this dealt real socialism, other than the "socialism" of a single corporation run by the state for the benefit of a *nomenklatura*, a death-blow.
What's interesting, also, in practical terms, is that the society then proceeded to self-destruct, in an agonizingly slow fashion, from 1940 to 1989.
Ultimately, there may have been a deep "contradiction" inserted in the Stalin years, for by encouraging artistic conservatism and shoring up the authoritarian family, Stalin only created people less able than the generation of the Civil Wars and the 1920s to see any reason for acting in other than their own good and that of their families.
Real "socialism" may be unnameable and undescribable for it would go all the way down to intimate relations. As it was, the culture of Stalinism imposed a false image of reality completely at variance with daily life, as young Mikhail Gorbachev noticed growing up on a collective farm in the late 1940s. His heroism (uncelebrated because for the people of Russia he was in charge during a Time of Troubles) was that he bided his time, married well, and brought the curtain down on the untenable scene. We are in Mikhail Sergeyevich's debt (and, hurts me to say it, Ron Reagan's debt) for doing the job without a great big war.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback