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Spot The Difference
 
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Spot The Difference

10 Oct 2010 | Format: MP3

£7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £18.21 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 10 Oct 2010
  • Label: Love Records
  • Copyright: 2010 Love Records
  • Total Length: 52:35
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004417OR8
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 57,975 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. Bloomfield on 27 Aug 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It's difficult to say quite what Squeeze were trying to achieve with this album. Some have said they released it because of licensing difficulties, but (the separate issue of 'rights' aside, which Chris Difford talks about in one interview) considering the recently-released "Essential Squeeze", I'm not sure what the point would be (although I'm willing to be enlightened). Alternatively, there was footage on their website featuring Mssrs Difford and Tilbrook talking about Squeeze wanting to be its own best tribute-band, a bizarre act of deference, but one which they quite rightly said they could pull off better than anybody else.

And this is something we're perhaps being asked to consider: as the group has recently re-formed, this is a wonderful way of showing the record-buying (or rather song-downloading) public that the band can still perform with the best of the young guns. It's an opportunity to show they can still sound as bright and as perky as they did all those years ago. This is important, because we hear they'll be releasing new material in the near future, but when I mention them to friends who aren't as ancient as I apparently am, they respond in ways that make you think they're looked upon as 'Golden Oldies', not particularly fashionable, and, well, the sort of thing your dad might listen to, if you bought him a gramophone record. So did it work?

Personally I was a little surprised at myself when I first put this album on. I thought I'd have it on in the background, knowing all the songs already, and wouldn't particularly listen to it; but in reality I was gripped, waiting eagerly for the next track, thinking to myself "just this one, and then I'll go and make a cup of tea... Okay, then I'll listen to the next one aswell...
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By DanDewey1974 on 14 Oct 2010
Format: Audio CD
Just a quick note to explain why Squeeze have bothered to re-record their greatest hits (and some misses) and release them when there are countless other greatest hit collections out there already.

Basically, they don't own the rights to their own songs, therefore Universal are free to release their songs for use on commercials etc without getting the band's permission. Also when they do, the band don't make any money from the use of their songs.

These have been re-recorded, so that the band can directly offer their songs for use in commercials and get paid for it.

The songs do sound very similar, sometimes identical to the originals, but I suppose that was the point.

For fans who probably already own countless greatest hits collections, it probably is still worth purchasing for the free bonus CD, that was recorded on the recent USA tour.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By C. P. Whiting on 17 Aug 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I wasn't sure what to expect from this album. As a Squeeze fan, I intended to purchase it anyway, but based my expectations on the earlier review. By enlarge the earlier review sums this album up very well and I'd tend to agree with most of what was written. I did however personally enjoy hearing these rerecordings very much. It is interesting to hear the difference between Squeeze as they were and what they are now. Many years have passed since these songs were originally released, but Tilbrook and Difford have not by any means lost their magic. Naturally I wouldn't ever want to substitute these versions for the originals, as these were the reason I grew to love their music in the first place. Nothing could replace the magic that the originals gave, however it was nice to hear these songs re-done and I was able to appreciate them in their own right.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By SDB MELLONIE on 23 Oct 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A few years' back, Chris Rea issued "New Light Through Old Windows", whereby he re-recorded some of his "hits" with slightly different arrangements. Whilst hardly varying from the original versions, they did (and still do) sit well next to them.
Sadly, Squeeze have effectively just re-recorded their hits here with little, if any variation. They're great songs but bring absolutely nothing new to them (not even a slightly higher octave on the backing vocals!) which is a real pity. Whilst I'm not suggesting they should have got Dizzee Rascal to MC half way through Cool For Cats (although then again...), they could have either re-arranged the songs slightly differently or - as Beautiful South did on a "Later..." programme once - got guest vocalists to sing with them.
So, what we have is a like-for-like recording of some of their best songs..which,as squeeze fans, we already have (a few times over).
What's particularly disappointing is that Chris Difford did record a fantastic re-interpretaion (acoustic and with him on vocals) of many of the same songs 3 or 4 years back on the sublime "South East Side Story" album.!South East Side Story [CD + DVD]
This, I think, was an opportunity missed. Buy "South East Side Story" instead and listen to the original recordings when you want full Squeeze versions.
What a pity..
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Christopher J. Welch on 3 Aug 2010
Format: Audio CD
Obviously released to cash in on the extensive American tour, and the Winter trek around the UK, Spot The Difference is possibly the most bizarre record Squeeze have ever released. Basically a collection of their better known singles re-recorded during 2010 featuring the current band line-up and with a guest vocal from Paul Carrack on Tempted.
Quite why messers Difford & Tilbrook wanted to mess with the sublime originals is a mystery, one suspects licensing deals and copywrite might have something to do with it, but whatever the reasons this is for die hard fans only.
In all fairness trying to re-create the recording techniques, the sounds of wobbly antique synths, 70's drum machines and sequencers must have been a nightmare. No Gilson, no Holland and, for the later tracks no 'bendy' bass from Keith Wilkenson. It's also worth noting that both Tilbrook's and Difford's voices have changed and matured over the years.
Some of the tracks work really well - Pulling Muscles From A Shell, Goodbye Girl and Black Coffee In Bed (replete with much tighter backing vocals). Others such as the Tilbrook sung 'Loving You Tonight' pales against the Paul Carrack original and Some Fantastic Place loses much of the emotion and beauty of the sublime original.
The problem is that everything is a little TOO perfect - the energy, the odd mistake, the excitement of knowing just how good they really were is missing.
BIG SQUEEZE is still the best way to enjoy the Deptford boys past glories - plus you get all the great B-Sides.
Next time round lets have a new collection of Difford & Tilbrook originals. Thats what we all really want.
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