FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
A Spectroscopic Atlas of ... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Wordery
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: This fine as new copy should be with you within 7-8 working days via Royal Mail. Please note this title is print on demand.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

A Spectroscopic Atlas of Bright Stars: A Pocket Field Guide (Astronomer's Pocket Field Guide) Paperback – 26 Oct 2009

4.5 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£24.99
£12.82 £12.86
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£24.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Springer; 2010 edition (26 Oct. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441907041
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441907042
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.2 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 999,299 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

From the reviews:

“Published by Springer as part of the Astronomer’s Pocket Field Guide series. … this new series is to ‘provide succinct, targeted information for practical observers.’ and in this regard Jack’s book fits the bill. In 200 pages it covers the subject very well. … This Atlas provides a wealth of data for the beginner in spectroscopy and provides useful comparison spectra for a whole range of stars which are easily visible in the northern hemisphere.” (Ken Harrison, Federation of Astronomical Societies, Vol. 93, Spring, 2010)

“The author has spent many years obtaining the spectra of about 70 of the apparently brightest stars in the Northern Hemisphere, using a 12 inch Dobsonian, a Rainbow Optics transmission grating and a photographic camera using black and white film. … it will be useful to teachers at schools or colleges who would like their students to do some elementary astronomical spectroscopy. The combination of finder charts and spectra for the brightest stars makes it a handy reference for such a purpose.” (E. Norman Walker, Astronomy Now, August, 2010)

“This pocket guide is a noble attempt to introduce practical stellar spectroscopy into backyard star-gazing. Imaging the spectra of bright stars is a hobby which Martin has pursued for many years, and is now offering to share with those who could easily follow … . he devotes a few pages to history and to scientific and technical explanation, with the rest of the book given over to the Atlas itself, displaying his own spectra of 72 stars.” (Elizabeth Griffin, The Observatory, Vol. 130, October, 2010)

From the Back Cover

Are you ready for a different way of looking at the stars? Do you want to understand more about what you are seeing through your telescope?

Painstakingly researched, with the data compiled over many years by the author (an amateur astronomer for 45 years), this handy user-friendly pocket-sized field atlas contains the spectra (spectral diagrams) of over 73 bright stars in the northern hemisphere and is intended for use by other amateurs, students, and educational institutions as an introduction to the fascinating and important science of stellar spectroscopy.

Professional atlases are far more complex. Until now, nothing was available at an amateur level. This book fills an important gap as the first amateur spectroscopic atlas to be published. The reader will not need to have any prior knowledge of the subject or understanding of complex mathematics in order to use this book. Written in plain English and without difficult equations, it can make the subject accessible to anyone. It can even serve as a guide to the stars at astronomy club meetings or star parties.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a true pocket sized edition which will fit easily into your pocket and can be retrieved with the minimum of fuss. Being well formatted there is no fumbling about turning the pages one way and then another, everything is laid out to enable the observer to quickly identify their target and gain the necessary information. I have already used this book a couple of times while out doing some binocular observing and it is very easy to use in the field. This book is for the observer who is not content to look at the pretty colours that some stars exhibit but also wishes to know luminosity, temperature, distance etc. Another plus is that most of us are blighted with light pollution with one sort or another; well this little book can be used with ease from the suburbs of a large city like London, all the stars used in the book are naked eye objects, so you don't even need a telescope to enjoy the science behind the stars. This is a useful collection to any astronomer's library packed with useful information without any mathematics involved (there are many books out there for the more mathematically inclined). I understand that Mr Martin did his entire data gathering from his back garden in the east end of London over many years, which for me, is pretty impressive stuff.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The author has worked long and hard to produce this atlas and all credit to him. However, the quality of the printing and of the paper lets the author down. The paper is too thin allowing, for example, the lines around the periodic table to show through on to the first of the spectrograms. The diagrams on pages 181 to 187 are very nearly illegible because of the very poor grey scale printing, indeed lines on the spectrograms are very faint sometimes.
To take the author to task just a litttle bit, he states that "anyone should be able to use (the book) without assuming any prior knowledge of the subject." (page 3). However, there are a couple of jumps in the sequence of knowledge eg the axes of the spectrograms are not labelled and there is no explanation of what the labelling of the lines in the spectrograms means eg H alpha etc.
As a complete novice I would have liked at least a mention of digital cameras.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a great reference book for the amateur astronomer who is learning about stars and the more experienced astronomer wishing to confirm their own results. Information is located with spectrograms and is clear and concise.
The Atlas is presented in simple language and never becomes too technical. There is a useful glossary which gives clear explanations and adds to the readers knowledge of the wider subject. Constellation maps are clear and make it very easy to locate the star under review.In general, the black and white spectrograms can be read, but an A4 size book would have made for clearer prints. An excellent book for anyone wishing to gain a wider understanding of the spectrososcopy of bright stars.A Spectroscopic Atlas of Bright Stars: A Pocket Field Guide (Astronomer's Pocket Field Guide)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback